background preloader

Zen Buddhism WWW Virtual Library

Zen Buddhism WWW Virtual Library
Created: 5 Sep 1994. Last updated: 10 Aug 2020. 25 years online and counting Edited by Dr T. This document is a part of the Buddhist Studies WWW Virtual Library Please notify tmciolek@ciolek.com about relevant new/changed online resources. This research tool is optimised for transmission speed, not for fancy looks. Updates, additions and corrections to this site have been kindly provided by: Nicholas H. visitors to www.ciolek.com since 08 May 1997. This page was originally established and maintained from Sep 1994 to Apr 1996 by Dr T. Maintainer: Dr T. Copyright (c) 1994-present by T. URL [See also:Aboriginal Studies || Asia Search Engines || Buddhist Studies || Ciolek - Research Papers || Global Timeline || || Information Quality || Tibetan Studies || Trade Routes || Zen Buddhism ]

breathe. | zen habits The Five Varieties of Zen An old Zen student called Hsiang-yen went to dokusan with Kuei-shan Ling-yu (771-853), the T'ang dynasty master, and Kuei-shan gave him a koan, of which over and over he was unable to see into it's mysteries. Hsiang-yen decided that it was all too much for him and he would surrender. He went away and found a sacred site, the grave of the Sixth Patriarch of Chinese Zen, Hui-neng, and maintained it as a shrine. Day in and day out he had no thought about the world except his sweeping. Then one day, sweeping away, he swept a pebble into a bamboo grove beside the shrine. The pebble hit a piece of hollow bamboo and went "ping!" Among the various types of Zen presented to the people of today there are some which are profound and some shallow, some that lead to Enlightenment and some that do not. (PLEASE CLICK) GASSHO(PLEASE CLICK)CLICK HERE FOR ENLIGHTENMENT ON THE RAZOR'S EDGE Source: "The Three Pillars of Zen", Kapleau, Roshi Phillip, pgs.44-52.

Learning Center - Engaged practice Engaged practice Buddhadasa Bhikkhu The Middle Way Life in a World of Polarity What's Buddhist about Socially Engaged Buddhism David Loy The Fourteen Precepts of Engaged Buddhism Thich Nhat Hanh Dharma for Healing the World Joanna Macy New Voices in Engaged Buddhist Studies Kenneth Kraft Engaged Buddhism Joan Halifax Roshi Practices for Activists Joanna Macy Rules of Engagement Kazuaki Tanahashi In Engaged Buddhism, Peace Begins with You Thich Nhat Hahn interview Comprehensive Bibliography - Socially Engaged Buddhism Buddhist Peace Fellowshio (compiled by Donald Rothberg - 2005) Justify Your Love: Finding Authority for Socially Engaged Buddhism: Ways of Relating Buddhist Tradition and Practice with Social Theory Diana Winston How Shall We Save the World? Nelson Foster Can Buddhism Save the World? A Response to Nelson Foster David R. Loy Socially Engaged Buddhism & Modernity: What Sort of Animals are They? Groups Buddhism and Ecology: Challenge and Promise Donald K. Ethics Hospice Dr.

Japanese Zen Buddhist Philosophy 1. The Meaning of the Term Zen The designation of this school of the Buddha-Way as Zen, which means sitting meditation, is derived from a transliteration of the Chinese word Chán. Because the Chinese term is in turn a transliteration of the Sanskrit term dhyāna, however, Zen owes its historical origin to early Indian Buddhism, where a deepened state of meditation, called samādhi, was singled out as one of the three components of study a Buddhist was required to master, the other two being an observation of ethical precepts (sīla) and an embodiment of nondiscriminatory wisdom (prajñā). 2. There are basically two methods utilized in meditation practice in Zen Buddhism to assist the practitioner to reach the above-mentioned goals, together with a simple breathing exercise known as “observation of breath count” (sūsokukan); one is the kōan method and the other is called “just sitting” (shikan taza), a form of “single act samādhi.” 3. 3.1 The Adjustment of the Body 4. 5. 6. 6.2 Zen’s Nothing

home page H-Buddhism Resources | H-Buddhism In order to have a project on your Network appear on one of the following pages, ensure at least two categories are present when publishing that content: Network Projects and the text of the category exactly as it appears below. Articles and Journals of Interest Articles and Journals of Interest projects include lists of professional publications. Bibliographies Bibliographies of all kinds can be found here. They might include publications in this network's field, specific bibliographies for use in teaching, etc. Conference Notes Find reports from the latest conferences here. Cross-Network Projects Any project that is created in collaboration with at least one other Network can be found here. Discussion Starters Posts and content the editors feel will help spark discussion on the Network can be found here. Dissertations and Theses in Progress Dissertations and Theses in Progress in this Network's field can be found here. Media Archives and Galleries Newsletters and Roundups Professional Development

Om Mani Padme Hum: The Meaning of the Mantra in Tibetan Buddhism Glimpsing a Few More Facets of the Mantra There are many ways to understand the meaning of the mantra. Here are a few of them: The Transformation of Speech [An excerpt from The Dharma, by Kalu Rinpoche, from a chapter on The Four Dharmas of Gampopa. ] "The second aspect of transformation [of confusion into wisdom] concerns our speech. Mere words, which have no ultimate reality, can determine our happiness and suffering. In the Vajrayana context, we recite and meditate on mantra, which is enlightened sound, the speech of the [Bhodisattva of Compassion], the union of Sound and Emptiness. At first, the Union of Sound and Emptiness is simply an intellectual concept of what our meditation should be. One of the disciples was very diligent, though his realization was perhaps not so profound. When the two disciples went to their lama to indicate they had finished the practice, he said, 'Oh, you've both done excellently. The Powers of the Six Syllables "Behold! H.H. top of page

Buddhist Studies WWW VL Est.: 5 Sep 1994. Last updated: 18 Aug 2016. Edited by: Dr T. Matthew Ciolek (The Australian National University, Canberra, AU), Prof. Joe Bransford Wilson (U. of North Carolina at Wilmington, US) and Privat-Dozent Jerome Ducor (Ethnographic Museum, Geneva, CH) in association with Adrian Hale, Barry Kapke, Murray Kessell, and Peter Schlenker (in US, UK, DE and AU). This site keeps track of leading information facilities in the fields of Buddhism and Buddhist studies.

Study Guides The Study Guides below are anthologies of readings that focus on a particular topic or theme, and are designed as aids for individual or group study. The texts are drawn from the Pali canon, teachings of the great Thai forest ajaans, and other sources. Unless otherwise indicated, they were prepared and introduced by Thanissaro Bhikkhu. Another useful collection of study materials may be found in Piya Tan's collection of "Sutta Discovery" essays and translations. Beyond Coping: The Buddha's Teachings on Aging, Illness, Death, and Separation, by Thanissaro Bhikkhu(1999; ??pages/1KB) Body Contemplation: A Study Guide, by Thanissaro Bhikkhu(2003; 47pp./142KB) An overview of the Buddha's teachings on contemplation of the body, and its role in the development of mindfulness, jhana, and discernment. The Five Aggregates: A Study Guide, by Thanissaro Bhikkhu(2010; 43pp./129KB) The Four Noble Truths: A Study Guide, by Thanissaro Bhikkhu(1999; 33pp./100KB)

Related: