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Zen Buddhism WWW Virtual Library

Zen Buddhism WWW Virtual Library
Created: 5 Sep 1994. Last updated: 10 Aug 2020. 25 years online and counting Edited by Dr T. This document is a part of the Buddhist Studies WWW Virtual Library Please notify tmciolek@ciolek.com about relevant new/changed online resources. This research tool is optimised for transmission speed, not for fancy looks. Updates, additions and corrections to this site have been kindly provided by: Nicholas H. visitors to www.ciolek.com since 08 May 1997. This page was originally established and maintained from Sep 1994 to Apr 1996 by Dr T. Maintainer: Dr T. Copyright (c) 1994-present by T. URL [See also:Aboriginal Studies || Asia Search Engines || Buddhist Studies || Ciolek - Research Papers || Global Timeline || || Information Quality || Tibetan Studies || Trade Routes || Zen Buddhism ]

:zenhabits Mystical Poetry of Rumi! Jelaluddin Rumi, the 13th century mystic poet, was truly one of the most passionate and profound poets in history. Now, today his presence still remains strong, due in part to how his words seem to drip of the divine, and startle a profound rememberance that links all back to the Soul-Essence. Born in what is present day Afghanistan in 1207, he produced his master work the Masnawi which consists of over 60,000 poems before he died in 1273. The best way to fully say in words his impact, is that he has the ability to describe the Indescribable, Ineffable-- God. I have included two different translators of his work. Coleman Barks on the first two pages, Shahram Shiva on the third. There is a community of the spirit. Join it, and feel the delight of walking in the noisy street and being the noise. Drink all your passion, and be a disgrace. Close both eyes to see with the other eye. From Essential Rumi by Coleman Barks This We Have Now This we have now is not imagination. This is not grief or joy. of God.

Nisargadatta Maharaj Nisargadatta Maharaj /ˌnɪsərɡəˈdɑːtə ˌmæhəˈrɑːdʒ/ (April 17, 1897 – September 8, 1981), born Maruti Shivrampant Kambli, was an Indian spiritual teacher and philosopher of Advaita (Nondualism), and a Guru, belonging to the Inchgiri branch of the Navnath Sampradaya. In 1973, the publication of his most famous and widely translated book, I Am That, an English translation of his talks in Marathi by Maurice Frydman, brought him worldwide recognition and followers.[1] Biography[edit] Early life[edit] In 1915, after his father died, he moved to Bombay to support his family back home, following his elder brother. In 1924 he married Sumatibai and they had three daughters and a son. Awakening[edit] In 1933, he was introduced to his guru, Siddharameshwar Maharaj, the head of the Inchegiri branch of the Navnath Sampradaya, by his friend Yashwantrao Baagkar. My Guru ordered me to attend to the sense 'I am' and to give attention to nothing else. Later years[edit] Style of teaching[edit] Teachings[edit] Films

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