background preloader

We are perfect Buddha Mind

We are perfect Buddha Mind
Related:  Writings!

How to Meditate - Guided Meditation Techniques - Buddhist Meditations Coffee Cup Analogy « Myriad Hues A group of alumni, highly established in their careers, got together to visit their old university lecturer. Conversation soon turned into complaints about stress in work and life. Offering his guests coffee, the lecturer went to the kitchen and returned with a large pot of coffee and an assortment of cups: porcelain, plastic, glass, some plain-looking and some expensive and exquisite, telling them to help themselves to hot coffee. When all the students had a cup of coffee in hand, the lecturer said: “If you noticed, all the nice-looking, expensive cups were taken up, leaving behind the plain and cheap ones. While it is normal for you to want only the best for yourselves, that is the source of your problems and stress. What all of you really wanted was coffee, not the cup, but you consciously went for the better cups and are eyeing each other’s cups.” “Now, if Life is coffee, then the jobs, money and position in society are the cups. Being happy does not mean everything is perfect.

Japanese Zen Buddhist Philosophy 1. The Meaning of the Term Zen The designation of this school of the Buddha-Way as Zen, which means sitting meditation, is derived from a transliteration of the Chinese word Chán. Because the Chinese term is in turn a transliteration of the Sanskrit term dhyāna, however, Zen owes its historical origin to early Indian Buddhism, where a deepened state of meditation, called samādhi, was singled out as one of the three components of study a Buddhist was required to master, the other two being an observation of ethical precepts (sīla) and an embodiment of nondiscriminatory wisdom (prajñā). The reason that meditation was singled out for the designation of this school is based on the fact that the historical Buddha achieved enlightenment (nirvāna) through the practice of meditation. 2. 3. When one engages in Zen meditation, Zen recommends that its practitioner follow a three-step procedure: adjusting body, breathing and mind. 3.1 The Adjustment of the Body 3.2 The Adjustment of Breathing 4. 5.

The Buddha This documentary for PBS by award-winning filmmaker David Grubin and narrated by Richard Gere, tells the story of the Buddha’s life, a journey especially relevant to our own bewildering times of violent change and spiritual confusion. It features the work of some of the world’s greatest artists and sculptors, who across two millennia, have depicted the Buddha’s life in art rich in beauty and complexity. Hear insights into the ancient narrative by contemporary Buddhists, including Pulitzer Prize winning poet W.S. Merwin and His Holiness the Dalai Lama. Join the conversation and learn more about meditation, the history of Buddhism, and how to incorporate the Buddha’s teachings on compassion and mindfulness into daily life. Two-thousand-five-hundred years ago in northern India, Prince Siddhartha left his palace where he had spent twenty-nine years indulging in pleasures. He was determined to comprehend the nature of human suffering. Watch the full documentary now (playlist - )

Druckversion - A Deity Goes into Retirement: Tibetans Face Uncertainty in Post-Dalai Lama Era - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News - International He certainly doesn't want to end up like the Queen. "With all due respect, and she's a very nice lady in person, but having to recite bad speeches written by someone else? It's not for me," says the 14th Dalai Lama, known among the faithful as "Ocean of Wisdom" and "Buddha of Compassion." He dabs at beads of sweat on his forehead, careful not to endanger a fly that has landed there. "I would feel like a puppet." For this reason, a political compromise was inconceivable for the man many worship as a "god-king." "It has nothing to do with resignation, or health reasons, only with insight," he said in a recent interview with SPIEGEL in the French city of Toulouse, where he was giving lectures on Buddhism, before traveling to Germany this week as the guest of the Hessian state government in the western city of Wiesbaden. For centuries, the Dalai Lama was, in the opinion of the overwhelming majority of Tibetans, both the secular and spiritual leader of his people. The curtain has fallen.

The Official Jerry Lewis Comedy Museum and Store The Announcer's Test This is called the announcer's test. It originated at Radio Central New York in the early 1940's as a cold reading test given to prospective radio talent to demonstrate their speaking ability. Del Moore, a long time friend of Jerry's, took this test at Radio Central New York in 1941, and passed it on to him. Jerry has performed this test on radio, television and stage for many years, and it has become a favorite tongue twister of his fans around the world. Biography / Museum Tour (Timeline) / Filmography / Museum StoreClips & Bites / Fan Club / "Damn Yankees" / Credits / Home Click Here to send us an email Click Here for Copyright information

Mindfulness In Plain English A PDF preview from the 20th edition - Click Here Special Offer - 20% Off the latest edition / The 20th Anniversary Edition - eBook or paperback / See Below "Mindfulness in Plain English" has been on UrbanDharma.org a while now for free download, but the edition I posted years ago was the first edition and is now rather dated. Over the last few months I have been in contact with the publisher at Wisdom Publications about M.I.P.E... I have come to understand any money that would have gone to Wisdom Publications (a non-profit publisher of Buddhist books) and the author Ven. I think supporting both Wisdom Publications and Ven. " Wisdom Publications and UrbanDharma.org have joined forces to offer a 20% discount code - UDMIP- on the New Edition of "Mindfulness in Plain English" which can be applied to both the 'paperback and eBook' version at check out, on the Wisdom Publications website... Buy from Wisdom Publications and get a 20% discount - Click Here - Apply UDMIP at Check Out. Peace...

Face to faith: How western Buddhism has changed in 50 years It's 50 years since Buddhist teachers started arriving in the west in the early 60s and Buddhism crash-landed into the counterculture. So what have we learned about western Buddhism? 1. It's not all about enlightenment. Many who found Buddhism in the 60s saw nirvana as the ultimate peak experience. A decade later these recovering hippies were painfully finding out that Buddhism is more concerned with reshaping character and behaviour than big, mystical experiences. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. Not everyone has the wisdom of the Dalai Lama - On Faith Q: Did the Pentagon do the right thing by disinviting evangelist Franklin Graham from a National Day of Prayer event next week? Should government officials decide who can or cannot speak at such an event? Should the government proclaim a National Day of Prayer? Was a federal judge right to rule it unconstitutional? The disinviting of Franklin Graham to the National Day of Prayer highlights the myriad problems that arise when the government takes a leading role in an activity that is best left to religious leaders. Unfortunately, “inclusion” has not been the underlying theme of the National Day of Prayer in previous years. Just last year, Graham stated, “[T]rue Islam cannot be practiced in this country. In 2001, Graham commented, “We’re not attacking Islam but Islam has attacked us. Clearly, Franklin Graham is not someone with whom Muslims would feel comfortable leading them in prayer. But the issue at the heart of the National Day of Prayer is larger than Franklin Graham.

Vintage Vinyl:Steal This Book Library of Congress number 72-157115 (stolen from Library of Congress) copyright ©1971 PIRATE EDITIONS Restaurants Food Programs Supermarkets Wholesale Markets Food Conspiracies Cheap Chow Free Clothing Sandals Free Furniture Hitch-Hiking Freighting Cars Buses Airlines In City Travel Communes Urban Living Rural Living List of Communes List of Free Universities Birth Control Clinics Abortions Diseases Treated Free Press Conference Wall Painting Use of the Flag Radio Free Telephones Pay Phones Movies and Concerts Records and Books Welfare Unemployment Panhandling Rip-Offs The International Yippie Currency Exchange Buying, Selling and Giving It Away Growing Your Own Laundry Pets Posters Security Postage Maps Ministry Attrocities Veteran's Benefits Watch Vacations Drinks Burials Astrodome Pictures Diploma Toilets Starting a Printing Workshop Underground Newspapers High School Papers G.I. News Services The Underground Press Switchboards Guerrilla Radio Guerrilla Television Dress Helmets Gas Masks Walkie-Talkies Other Equipment Weapons for Street Fighting

Why I Am Not A Christian, by Bertrand Russell Introductory note: Russell delivered this lecture on March 6, 1927 to the National Secular Society, South London Branch, at Battersea Town Hall. Published in pamphlet form in that same year, the essay subsequently achieved new fame with Paul Edwards' edition of Russell's book, Why I Am Not a Christian and Other Essays ... (1957). As your Chairman has told you, the subject about which I am going to speak to you tonight is "Why I Am Not a Christian." What Is a Christian? Nowadays it is not quite that. But for the successful efforts of unbelievers in the past, I could not take so elastic a definition of Christianity as that. The Existence of God To come to this question of the existence of God: it is a large and serious question, and if I were to attempt to deal with it in any adequate manner I should have to keep you here until Kingdom Come, so that you will have to excuse me if I deal with it in a somewhat summary fashion. The First-cause Argument The Natural-law Argument The Moral Problem

What Kind of Buddhist was Steve Jobs, Really? | NeuroTribes Hello there! If you enjoy the content on Neurotribes, consider subscribing for future posts via email or RSS feed. Kobun Chino Otogawa, Steve Jobs' Zen teacher. One reason I was looking forward to reading Walter Isaacson’s new biography of Steve Jobs was my hope that, as a sharp-eyed reporter, Isaacson would probe to the heart of what one of the few entrepreneurs who really deserved the term “visionary” learned from Buddhism. By now, everyone knows the stories of how the future founder of Apple dropped acid, went to India on a quest for spiritual insight, met a laughing Hindu holy man who took a straight razor to his unkempt hair, and was married in a Zen ceremony to Laurene Powell in 1991. Isaacson does a fine job of showing how Jobs’ engagement with Buddhism was more than just a lotus-scented footnote to a brilliant Silicon Valley career. Why would a former phone phreak who perseverated over the design of motherboards be interested in doing that? Flowers at Tassajara. Bodhidharma.

Related: