background preloader

Personal Learning Networks for Educators

Personal Learning Networks for Educators
Related:  PLN

Personal learning network A personal learning network is an informal learning network that consists of the people a learner interacts with and derives knowledge from in a personal learning environment. In a PLN, a person makes a connection with another person with the specific intent that some type of learning will occur because of that connection.[1][2] The following is an excerpt from Dryden's and Vos' book on learning networks:[4] "For the first time in history, we know now how to store virtually all humanity's most important information and make it available, almost instantly, in almost any form, to almost anyone on earth. We also know how to do that in great new ways so that people can interact with it , and learn from it." Personal learning networks share a close association with the concept of personal learning environments. Aspects[edit] PLNs are becoming an important part of professional development in several fields with some businesses creating their own e-learning content and PLEs for their employees.

My Classroom Observation | Open Websites During the course of the semester, I had the opportunity to observe a seasoned instructor at ESL services here at UT. The course that I observed was an Intermediate Reading and Discussion class. I felt very fortunate to have been able to observe this class. The instructor created an environment that was conducive to learning in which all the students appeared to feel at ease due to her warm, friendly personality and also because she was approachable and appeared to possess a genuine interest in hearing her students' opinions. One thing that I learned from this instructor related to planning and adapting those plans to fit the students' needs. The instructor made good use of authentic materials. I believe this instructor to be highly effective and someone to whom I can use as a model. Click here to view my Classroom Observaion in its entirety

Infographic: #PLearning Framework (Part 2 of the Series) - Getting Smart by Guest Author - learning, personalized learning, plearning, students By: Justin DeLeon #PLearning Framework (Part 2 of the Series) first appeared on Education Elements on April 2, 2014. When you think of “personalized,” you probably think “unique,” “special,” and “just for me.” For the most part, we personalize as much of our lives as possible. We stock our cabinets and fridges with food based on our dietary needs and what we enjoy eating. Applying the idea of personalization to our phones or what we eat is fairly straight-forward. Take a deep breath. Drivers: Needs and Goals What are the specific academic needs, interests and learning styles of each student? Learning Experience: Path, Pace and Pedagogy + Choice How do students’ needs and learning goals influence the design of students’ assessments and assignments? Operational Model What school and/or classroom model will support the students in advancing down their paths? Results How will you measure whether or not students’ needs are being met?

Personal Learning Networks for Educators: 10 Tips - Getting Smart by Guest Author - edchat, EdTech, PLN By Dr. Mark Wagner I often begin my workshop on personal learning networks (PLN) for educators by asking these questions: Who is in your learning network? Who do you learn from on a regular basis? Who do you turn to for your own professional development? Some educators are lucky enough to learn from their coworkers or colleagues at their site. I usually ask these questions at conferences, which are frequently only annual events – and rare treats for many educators. Learning to Network and Networking to Learn 1. 2. 3. 4. Networking Tools and Anecdotes The four tips above are the core activities of building a personal learning network, and they can be applied using various tools to connect with others online. 5. 6. 7. 8. Final Thoughts These final two tips will help keep your initial frustrations in perspective, and help you avoid the temptation to focus on unimportant metrics as you grow your network. 9. 10. Note: I’ve also been writing about this topic for some time.

Intro to communities of practice The term “community of practice” is of relatively recent coinage, even though the phenomenon it refers to is age-old. The concept has turned out to provide a useful perspective on knowing and learning. A growing number of people and organizations in various sectors are now focusing on communities of practice as a key to improving their performance.This brief and general introduction examines what communities of practice are and why researchers and practitioners in so many different contexts find them useful as an approach to knowing and learning. What are communities of practice? Note that this definition allows for, but does not assume, intentionality: learning can be the reason the community comes together or an incidental outcome of member’s interactions. The domain: A community of practice is not merely a club of friends or a network of connections between people. It is the combination of these three elements that constitutes a community of practice. Where does the concept come from?

Stages of PLN adoption David Warlick wrote a post the other day about being able to zip up or turn off your Personal Learning Network (PLN). I too have been thinking about how one goes about starting a PLN, how do you monitor it, and how do you learn to shut it off. We all continue to push teachers to start PLNs if they haven’t already. Learning from the collective knowledge of educators around the world. I have noticed an emerging trend of what one goes through when adopting a PLN for the first time. As I’ve helped others start their PLNs I have found that many of them go through these same stages. Stages of Personal Learning Networks Adoption Stage 1 Immersion: Immerse yourself into networks. Stage 2 Evaluation: Evaluate your networks and start to focus in on which networks you really want to focus your time on. Stage 3 Know it all: Find that you are spending many hours trying to learn everything you can. Stage 4 Perspective: Start to put your life into perspective. [tags]PLN[/tags]

How to build a professional learning community (no matter what job you have) - Daily Genius Let’s say you have a solid job that lets you have a great work-life balance. You get to do something you enjoy, have job security, and can take care of your family / self. Whatever that job is, you probably have it in the back of your mind that it might be worth … at some point … trying to get ahead. Maybe you want to learn a new skill and apply for that corner office job? What is that, you ask? See also: 10 social media mistakes you’re probably making In an effort to help you get ahead in life, we’ve built a simple but useful road-map for building a professional learning community.

Two Case Studies: How Connected Educators Can Transform Schools Figuring out which new teaching practices or pieces of technology might work in a classroom can feel like a full-time job. Lots of educators spend their free time researching new ideas and connecting with other educators, but there are plenty more that find the process confusing and overwhelming. How much easier would it be to have a dedicated staff person whose job is to bring new ideas into the district, support teachers and smooth the way with administrators? That’s what Kris Hupp does for Cornell School District, a tiny district in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. “Our teachers want to learn and try new technologies, but if they try something and it blows up in their faces no one is going to be upset.” The most important thing about his job is to create trust with both teachers and administrators who sometimes find themselves on opposite sides of labor disputes and budget issues, Hupp said. Hupp also runs a Professional Learning Community (PLC) of both teachers and administrators.

Related: