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Fun Facts on Vikings for kids ***

Fun Facts on Vikings for kids ***
Fun Facts on Vikings for KidsLooking for help with homework and school? Find out fast, fun facts and interesting information using our useful fact files, fact sheets and funny videos on each of the Viking Subjects. The free Facts Files and Fact sheets provide interesting, amazing, fun facts and information, together with pictures, photos and a fun video. The free fact files and free fact sheets include cool info plus a free video, they are great guide to the Viking Era and include topics about warriors, ships, women, children, history, clothing and daily home life Fun Facts on Vikings Ships for KidsFind out quick, fun facts and interesting information using our useful fact files and fact sheets on Viking Ships. Fun Facts on Viking Warriors for KidsDiscover fast, interesting fun facts on Viking Warriors and learn some amazing, cool and quick information. Fun Facts on Clothing for KidsLearn fast facts about clothing in the Viking Era. Funny and Fun Facts on Vikings for Kids via Videos Related:  Viking FolderVikings

Primary History - Vikings Vikings Homework Help Where did the Vikings settle in Britain? The area eventually settled by Vikings was called the Danelaw. It formed a boundary separating Anglo-Saxon England from Viking England and was defined in a treaty between the English King Alfred and Viking King Guthrum in AD 880. It lay north of Watling Street, a Roman road running from London north-west to Chester and covered northern and eastern England. The Vikings settled in: Islands off the coast of Scotland - Shetland, Orkney and The Hebrides Around the north and north west coast of Scotland Parts of Ireland - Dublin is a Viking city The Isle of Man Small parts of Wales Parts of England known as Danelaw Place Names We can tell where the Vikings settled by place names of towns and villages today. Place names ending in –by eg. Derby - A village where deer are found Place names ending in –thorpe (or -thorp, -throp or –trop) eg. Place names ending in –toft or-tofts. Viking Words

* 101 Viking Facts from the History Specialists 1. Vikings were very clean people (at least by comparison to other people at the time!). 2. A Viking's most treasured weapon was his sword. They were handed down generations via inheritance, were often named and could be inscribed with runes by talented smiths to magically increase their power. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 52. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60. 61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90. 91. 92. 93. 94. 95. 96. 97. 98. 99. 100. 101. Content on our site can be reproduced for educational purposes.

Longhouse A longhouse or long house is a type of long, proportionately narrow, single-room building built by peoples in various parts of the world including Asia, Europe and North America. Many were built from timber and often represent the earliest form of permanent structure in many cultures. Types include the Neolithic long house of Europe, the stone Medieval Dartmoor longhouse which also housed livestock, and the various types of longhouses built by different cultures among the indigenous peoples of the Americas. Europe[edit] There are two European longhouse types of designs that are now extinct. The medieval longhouse types of Europe of which some have survived are among others: Dartmoor granite longhouse Medieval development of the Germanic longhouse[edit] The Americas[edit] In South America, the Tucano people of Colombia and northwest Brazil traditionally combine a household in a single long house. Asia[edit] Ancient Mumun pottery period culture[edit] Taiwan[edit] Borneo longhouse[edit] Siberut[edit]

Vikings for children | Vikings homework help | Vikings for KS1 and KS2 The Vikings wanted new land because the places where they came from in Scandinavia – Norway, Sweden and Denmark – weren’t very easy to live on. It was hard to grow crops, which meant there wasn’t a lot of food as the population got bigger. Britain and Europe had plenty of good farmland, so the Vikings tried to claim some of that land for themselves. Even though the Anglo-Saxons were pretty well established in England, the Vikings would turn up every now and then to raid towns and take a bit of land. The first Viking attack on England was in 787 on the Isle of Portland. The Vikings believed in many different gods, and they thought making sacrifices to the gods kept them all happy. Thor, the god of thunder Idun, the goddess of spring Odin, the king of gods and the god of war The Vikings believed that if a warrior died while fighting in battle, he’d go to Valhalla, which is where Odin was. Viking warriors were very good fighters. Viking homes were long too – they were called longhouses!

Mead hall A reconstructed Viking Age longhouse (28.5 metres long). In ancient Scandinavia and Germanic Europe a mead hall or feasting hall was initially simply a large building with a single room. From the fifth century to early medieval times such a building was the residence of a lord and his retainers. The mead hall was generally the great hall of the king. Etymology[edit] The old name of such halls may have been sal/salr and thus be present in old place names such as "Uppsala".[1] The meaning has been preserved in German Saal, Romanian Sala, Dutch zaal, Icelandic salur, Swedish sal, Finnish sali, French salle and Italian sala (all meaning "hall" or "large room"). Archaeology[edit] From around AD 500 up until the Christianization of Scandinavia (by the 13th century), these large halls were vital parts of the political center. Examples that have been excavated include: Southwest of Lejre, Denmark. Precursor[edit] The mead hall developed from European longhouses: Legends and history[edit] In J.

Viking Longships - Children's British History Encyclopedia Many Vikings were good sailors because they lived close to rivers and fjords (sea inlets). They grew up from childhood able to use ships for fishing and travelling. A big Viking longship would be about 30 metres long and were made from overlapping planks of oak wood joined together with iron rivets (bits of metal hammered into holes). Each ship could carry 60 men. The sails were brightly coloured in stripes or diamond patterns. The Vikings loved to decorate their ships with fine wooden carvings. The ship was steered by means of a rudder, mounted on the side, near to the back of the ship. They used the: sun, moon and stars to help them navigate. The Vikings gave their ships names like: Long Serpent, Raven of the Wind or Snake of the Sea.

Viking Axe - Cold Steel Knives Specifications: Overall Length: 52" Hawk Length: 9 5/8" Primary Edge: 10 1/3" Steel: 1055 Carbon Weight: 4 Lbs. 10 oz Handle: 48" Long. Hickory Viking Axe Cold Steel has been a long time believer in the ferocious cutting power of a well-designed Viking Axe. Until recently, we lacked the technical ability to make one to our satisfaction. However, with our new state-of-the-art forging facility, we can offer our customers something truly exceptional. Our Viking Axe's formidably long, thin blade is fully polished and hand sharpened to a bone-splitting, shield shattering edge. To maximize leverage, strength, and dexterity of movement, the Viking Axe is equipped with a very strong, resilient haft.

Viking Adventures A one-hour schools and families broadcast called Viking Adventures from the British Museum. Ed Petrie, much-loved presenter of Pompeii Live for schools, and well-known BBC presenter Sonali Shah will present the show. "Viking Adventures from the British Museum should be compulsory viewing for all school age children. Education Authorities should book en-bloc and take all the school children to the cinema for this experience!" Aimed at Key Stage 2 children aged 7–11 and aligned with the National Curriculum, this specially produced film will feature lots of Viking dressing up, experiments, sword fights and even Viking-style food (food tastings with herrings and purple carrots!). Download resource pack for primary teachers If your local cinema is not listed please email cinema@britishmuseum.org with details and we will contact them. If you and your family would like to watch Viking Adventures please check local listings, these viewings are exclusively for schools.

What Vikings really looked like The fine decoration of the Oseberg ship in Norway, which was buried in the year 834, provides clues to what Vikings looked like. Inside the ship were two women and the archaeologists believe the ship has served as a sarcophagus. (Photo: Annie Dalbéra) There’s no shortage of myths about the appearance of our notorious Viking ancestors. To find out more about these myths, ScienceNordic’s Danish partner site, videnskab.dk, asked its Facebook readers to list their favourite myths about what the Vikings looked like. We have picked out five myths from the resulting debate and asked researchers to help us confirm or bust these myths. Armed with this information, our graphic designer then took a shot at drawing some examples of our infamous forefathers, which you can see in our picture gallery. The five myths are: MYTH 1: Vikings were dirty and unkempt Unwashed, rough warriors with froth hanging out of the corners of the mouth. But that’s unlikely to be true: It wasn’t enough just to be clean.

The Vikings - Britons, Gaels, Picts, Angles and Vikings The Vikings were Norsemen who came to raid and pillage, to trade and to settle in Scotland. They were expert sailors who made their way across the treacherous North Sea in longships from Norway and Denmark from the late 8th century. The Vikings sailed as far west as Greenland and North America. The pagan Vikings raided Christian monasteries in search of gold and silver, food and slaves. In this year terrible portents appeared over Northumbria and sadly affrightened the inhabitants: there were exceptional flashes of lightning, and fiery dragons were seen flying in the air. Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, AD 793 The Norse began to settle in Scotland and gradually merged with the local people. Before the Vikings came as raiders their ancestors were probably traders who visited Scotland.

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