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42 maps that explain World War II

42 maps that explain World War II
by Timothy B. Lee on November 13, 2014 World War II was a great tragedy, claiming 60 million lives and throwing millions more into turmoil. Yet the war also spurred rapid technological development, hastened the end of colonialism, and laid the foundation for institutions like the United Nations and the European Union. Here are 42 maps that explain the conflict — how it started, why the Allies won, and how it has shaped the modern world. Background World War II, animatedWorld War II was the biggest conflict in world history, with major battles on three continents and some of the largest naval engagements in history. The Axis (and the Soviet Union) attacks Japan and China were already at war in 1937People often describe World War II as beginning in September 1939 when Germany invaded Poland. The Allies besieged Tens of thousands of British troops escape from DunkirkThe war in France didn't go well for the Allies. The USA and USSR are drawn into the conflict The Allies retake Europe and Africa

http://www.vox.com/2014/11/13/7148855/40-maps-that-explain-world-war-ii

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Iconographic Database The Warburg Institute Iconographic Database contains digitised images from the Institute's Photographic Collection and Library. The material for which the Warburg Institute holds the copyrights is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial 3.0 Unported License. Search by iconographic keywords or browse the iconographic classification system.To search by artist, date, location, or other parameters, please use the advanced search menu. How to make infographics: a beginner’s guide to data visualisation As a growing number of international NGOs are using infographics, charts and interactive maps to share success and highlight disaster, how can organisations with less resources create high quality visualisations without having to pay to outsource them? We’ve put together a beginner’s guide for visualising development data. Organising your data The first thing you need to do is have a clear idea of the data you want to visualise. Are you trying to highlight a particular disparity between money spent in one place and another? Are you trying to show a volume of activity going on in one location?

Home - Children and World War 1 - LibGuides at State Library of South Australia Oral history is the recording of memories of peoples' unique life experiences. The State Library of South Australia's JD Somerville Oral History Collection is the central repository for unpublished oral history tapes and transcripts in South Australia. In 1979, interviews were conducted with 39 women as part of the research for an Honours Degree thesis entitled 'South Australian women - some responses to the First World War' (Department of History, University of Adelaide).

The life and reign of English kings and queens visualised Primogeniture is a pain. You can spend all your life waiting to be king or queen and then just have a few years on the throne - or you could be ruling for basically all of your life, which is probably a lot of responsibility. Elizabeth II is under a year away from becoming the longest reigning monarch in the history of England or the United Kingdom - Victoria was on the throne for 63 years - with this in mind we were inspired to look at how other post-Norman conquest rulers have lasted. The gold line shows how many years (in decimals) the monarch reigned and the blue shows the years of their life when they were not the country’s monarch. Although it is not quite as straightforward as it seems. One example is Henry VI and Edward IV were duking it out and deposing each other during the Wars of the Roses.

A Real Map of the Middle East Could this map be any more different from the previous one discussed on this blog? That one dealt with the water, wetlands and shifting shorelines of Louisiana. This one zooms in on lines in the sand of the Middle-Eastern desert. Yet both maps do something similar: knowing that our current maps no longer reflect reality, they replace their conventional wisdom with a new cartography, based on the new facts on the ground. For Louisiana, that means a shoreline that bites much deeper inland.

The Ideal World War I British Trench - History Daily Dec 082016 Andrew Belsey, an architectural modelmaker from London, England, created a series of trench sections – each showing different aspect of trench warfare. This is his “Ideal Trench” Smarthistory: a multimedia web-book about art and art history Smarthistory offers more than 1500 videos and essays on art from around the world and across time. We are working with more than 200 art historians and some of the world's most important museums to make the best art history resource anywhere. Use the "subject" pulldown menu (go to "Arts and Humanities") at the top of this window or click on the headings below to access our content: Art history basics

Mongolia Adopts An Innovative System of 3-Word Locations The idea is simple enough. Wouldn’t locations be easier to remember if we traded in complicated GPS coordinates for simple and memorable three-word phrases? That’s the idea behind what3words, a new system that—in the words of Big Think’s Frank Jacobs in his entertaining article on the system—is “doing for geolocation what domain names did for IP addresses.” That is, make them easier to share and to remember. (Read Frank’s article—it’s fun.) what3words has divided up the earth into 57 trillion three-by-three-meter squares and created an algorithm to assign each one a three-word name.

World War 2 World War 2, also known as the Second World War, was a war fought from 1939 to 1945 in Europe and, during much of the 1930s and 1940s, in Asia. The war in Europe began in earnest on September 1, 1939 with the invasion of Poland by Nazi Germany, and concluded on September 2, 1945, with the official surrender of the last Axis nation, Japan. However, in Asia the war began earlier with Japanese interventions in China, and in Europe, the war ended earlier with the unconditional surrender of Germany on May 8, 1945. The conflict spilled over into Africa, included a handful of incidents in the Americas, and a series of major naval battles.

Terrorism, Counterterrorism, and Unconventional Warfare chemical and biological weapons: global terrorism: WMD terrorism: terrorism in the United States: terrorism in Israel: terrorism in Russia: Magnificent Maps: Cartography as Power, Propaganda, and Art By Maria Popova Three of my great fascinations — cartography as art, propaganda design, and antique maps — converge in Magnificent Maps: Power, Propaganda and Art (public library). The lavish tome collects cartographic curiosities from the golden age of display maps — the period between 1450 and 1800, when maps were as much a practical tool for navigation as they were works of art and affirmations of cultural hegemony or social status — culled from the formidable collection of the British Library. Peter Barber, who heads the map collections at the British Library, and Tom Harper, BL’s Curator of Antiquarian Mapping, contextualize the maps with detailed descriptions of how and where they were used, from schoolrooms to bedchambers, and explore their parallel role as art and propaganda.

World War II Facts, information and articles about World War II, 1939-1945 USS Arizona Pearl Harbor World War II Facts The Beauty of Maps: Seeing Art in Cartography We love maps. And we love data visualization, of which maps are among the earliest and most ubiquitous examples. As location continues to tickle the tips of trend analysts’ tongues and location-based applications take over the mobile landscape, it’s interesting — if not necessary — to understand the historical context of our relationship with location and geography. That’s exactly what a new BBC series titled The Beauty of Maps: Seeing Art in Cartography explores.

Digitised WWI Victorian newspapers A major project commemorating World War I has digitised 216 WWI-era Victorian community newspapers and made them available online via the National Library of Australia’s Trove portal. Victorians everywhere can now explore the stories of their communities and family and friends who lived and fought through the Great War. This digitised collection contains thousands of stories waiting to be found.

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