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The Participatory Panopticon vs. The Pentagon The Participatory Panopticon vs. The Pentagon Digital cameras may have had their Rodney King moment this last week, with the pictures taken of prisoner abuses by American troops in Iraq, sent via email around the world. When coupled with digital technology, that three-step process -- See, Snap, Send -- becomes revolutionary action. Whether the people taking the pictures did so out of a sense of outrage, a desire to document a moment, or misguided amusement, the result is the same: the knowledge that anyone, anywhere, with a digital camera and a network connection has enormous power, perhaps enough to alter the course of a war or the policies of the most powerful nation on Earth. Newsday: During his testimony, Rumsfeld made clear his exasperation with dealing with a "radioactive" scandal, when images shot by a digital camera can be beamed around the world almost instantaneously by e-mail or stored by the hundreds on a CD. This should come as no surprise. Posted by: gmoke on 10 May 04

Scraping for… by Paul Bradshaw Scraping - getting a computer to capture information from online sources - is one of the most powerful techniques for data-savvy journalists who want to get to the story first, or find exclusives that no one else has spotted. Faster than FOI and more detailed than advanced search techniques, scraping also allows you to grab data that organisations would rather you didn’t have - and put it into a form that allows you to get answers. Scraping for Journalists introduces you to a range of scraping techniques - from very simple scraping techniques which are no more complicated than a spreadsheet formula, to more complex challenges such as scraping databases or hundreds of documents. At every stage you'll see results - but you'll also be building towards more ambitious and powerful tools. You’ll be scraping within 5 minutes of reading the first chapter - but more importantly you'll be learning key principles and techniques for dealing with scraping problems.

The Rise of the Participatory Panopticon This week, I spoke at the first MeshForum conference, held in Chicago. The following is an adaptation of my talk, which adapts some earlier material with some new observations. Fair warning: it's a long piece. I look forward to your comments. The photo at right is by Howard Greenstein, taken during my presentation. Soon -- probably within the next decade, certainly within the next two -- we'll be living in a world where what we see, what we hear, what we experience will be recorded wherever we go. And we will be doing it to ourselves. This won't simply be a world of a single, governmental Big Brother watching over your shoulder, nor will it be a world of a handful of corporate siblings training their ever-vigilant security cameras and tags on you. I call this world the Participatory Panopticon. The Panopticon was Jeremy Bentham's 18th century model for a prison in which all inmates could be watched at all times. This day is coming not because of some distant breakthrough or revolution.

Participatory Media Literacy / Participatory Media Literacy Guide To This Site's Contents Welcome to Participatory Media Literacy (Home)BloggingWikiRSSSocial Bookmarking, Tagging, Music/Photo/Video SharingPodcastingVideo BloggingDigital Video ResourcesDigital StorytellingMashupsChat: Channeling the BackchannelTransliteracyForecasting: Thinking long term, developing foresight Participatory Media Education Resources Recent technological changes have made much wider social changes possible: Until the end of the twentieth century, only a relatively small and wealthy fraction of the human race could broadcast television programs, publish newspapers, create encyclopedias; by the twenty first century, however, inexpensive digital computers and ubiquitous Internet access made the means of high quality media production and distribution accessible to a substantial portion of the world's population. The technical power of many-to-many communication networks amplifies human social networking capabilities [abstract][pdf].

Public Intelligence Blog Five frameworks to build strategies for the future of media We are big believers in the power of visual frameworks to help people understand complex landscapes and build effective strategies. One of the domains we have been applying these frameworks to is the future of media. For those who haven’t been following our work through the years, here is a collection of five frameworks we’ve created to help companies understand and act on the future of media. These are frequently used in strategy workshops, and also in more structured strategy development processes. We have also created a number of custom future of media frameworks in the course of strategy consulting projects for clients, to address the particular issues they are facing, however unfortunately we cannot share these publicly. Click on the title or images for links to the original posts, which contain full explanations as well as large versions of the frameworks. Future of Media Strategic Framework Key Elements of Media Business Models Media Lifecycle Framework Future of Media: Strategy Tools

Columbia Journalism Review Misinformation: Why it sticks and how to fix it Childhood vaccines do not cause autism. Barack Obama was born in the United States. Global warming is confirmed by science. And yet, many people believe claims to the contrary. Why does that kind of misinformation stick? The main reason that misinformation is sticky, according to the researchers, is that rejecting information actually requires cognitive effort. And when we do take the time to thoughtfully evaluate incoming information, there are only a few features that we are likely to pay attention to: Does the information fit with other things I believe in? Misinformation is especially sticky when it conforms to our preexisting political, religious, or social point of view. Even worse, efforts to retract misinformation often backfire, paradoxically amplifying the effect of the erroneous belief. "At an individual level, misinformation about health issues -- for example, unwarranted fears regarding vaccinations or unwarranted trust in alternative medicine -- can do a lot of damage.

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