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18 Common Words That You Should Replace in Your Writing

18 Common Words That You Should Replace in Your Writing
It’s a familiar scene: you’re slumped over your keyboard or notebook, obsessing over your character. While we tend to agonize over everything from structure to backstory, it’s important to weigh how you write something too. A perfectly constructed world is flat on the page if you use feeble, common words. When you’re finished constructing your perfectly balanced world, do your writing a favor and take another pass to weed out these 18 haggard words. Good High on any list of most used English words is “good.” New Another of the common words in English is “new.” Long Much like “new,” “long” is spent, yet it doesn’t always register as such while you’re writing. Old “Old” is certainly one of those common words that means more to readers if you’re specific about how old a subject is. Right “Right” is also among the common words that tends to slip through our writer filters. Different Small “Small” is another adjective that is too generic for writing as good as yours. Large Next Young Never Things All

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45 ways to avoid using the word 'very' A posthaven user upvoted this post. — habebaakiar 3 years ago — barcahaters 3 years ago — Jan Arzooman 3 years ago — Y.Babadogan 3 years ago There's a Word for That: 25 Expressions You Should Have in Your Vocabulary Recently I came across this amazing little Tumblr named ‘OtherWordly‘ – itself a play on words. It consists of a collection of strange and lovely words from different languages through different times. What I like most about this selection of consonants and vowels – little meaning-carrying packages of vibration – is that they all try to point to the unspeakable, the transient or the neglected. That which we forget in the busyness of our daily grind. Words have the power to remind us – and therefore we should choose our words carefully so we are reminded of the things that nourish our souls. You can find my favourite words below – pick five that resonate most, write them down, yes seriously – go grab a pen -, make sure to learn them by heart, teach them to your inner voice and share them with others to guide our collective attention to what truly matters.

Important Infrequently Used Words To Know Paul V. Hartman (The Capitalized syllable gets the emphasis) alacrity a-LACK-ra-tee cheerful willingness and promptnessanathema a-NATH-a-ma a thing or person cursed, banned, or reviledanodyne AN-a-dine not likely to cause offence or disagreement and somewhat dull//anything that sooths or comfortsaphorism AFF-oar-ism a short, witty saying or concise principleapostate ah-POSS-tate (also: apostasy) person who has left the fold or deserted the faith.arrogate ARROW-gate to make an unreasonable claimatavistic at-a-VIS-tic reverting to a primitive typeavuncular a-VUNC-you-lar “like an uncle”; benevolent bathos BATH-ose an anticlimaxbereft ba-REFT to be deprived of something valuable “He was bereft of reason.” cynosure SIGH-na-shore (from the Greek: “dog’s tail”) center of attention; point to which all eyes are drawn.

100 Exquisite Adjectives By Mark Nichol Adjectives — descriptive words that modify nouns — often come under fire for their cluttering quality, but often it’s quality, not quantity, that is the issue. Plenty of tired adjectives are available to spoil a good sentence, but when you find just the right word for the job, enrichment ensues. Practice precision when you select words. Words Instead of Said Not that anyone is asking me (but that has never stopped me before and it won't stop me now), but I do try to avoid using 'said' too much. It gets a tad tedious, I find. On the other hand, using a substitute simply for the sake of - well, using a substitute - can be ineffective. I thought your list was interesting, Somesh (beware whenever anyone says something is interesting

Persuasive Writing - Emotional vs Intellectual Words I have written about persuasive writing in an article where I discuss Ethos, Logos, Pathos. Persuasive writers use words to convince the reader to listen or to act. I found this useful list of words in an interesting article called Common words that suck emotional power out of your content by John Gregory Olson. He explains how words have emotions attached to them, and that you should choose the correct ones for the response you want to elicit from your reader. Use these words if you want to get an emotional, rather than an intellectual, response from your readers. Click on the link to read the full article. Synonyms for words commonly used in student's writing Amazing- incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary Anger- enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden Angry- mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed Answer- reply, respond, retort, acknowledge Ask- question, inquire of, seek information from, put a question to, demand, request, expect, inquire, query, interrogate, examine, quiz Awful- dreadful, terrible, abominable, bad, poor, unpleasant

World-building I’ve been busy worldbuilding this week. It’s one of my favorite things to do in the process of writing sci-fi, and it makes me all giddy and drooly like a kid that’s been dropped into a toybox. Since I revisited my collected materials for the worlds I’m writing in, and have overhauled one of these entirely, I grabbed the opportunity to put together a list of important worldbuilding questions to share with you. Not every author goes about worldbuilding the same way — and that’s perfectly fine, since not every genre needs it, and not every story is focused primarily on the setting. List of forms of word play This is a list of techniques used in word play with Wikipedia articles. Techniques that involve the phonetic values of words Mondegreen: a mishearing (usually unintentional) ase as a homophone or near-homophone that has as a result acquired a new meaning. The term is often used to refer specifically to mishearings of song lyrics (cf. soramimi).Onomatopoeia: a word or a grouping of words that imitates the sound it is describingRhyme: a repetition of identical or similar sounds in two or more different words Alliteration: matching consonants sounds at the beginning of wordsAssonance: matching vowel soundsConsonance: matching consonant soundsHolorime: a rhyme that encompasses an entire line or phraseSpoonerism: a switch of two sounds in two different words (cf. sananmuunnos)Janusism: the use of phonetics to create a humorous word (e.g. GAYsha from Geisha)) Techniques that involve semantics and the choosing of words

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