background preloader

Flipped Learning Toolkit: Flipping the Non-Flippable Classes

Flipped Learning Toolkit: Flipping the Non-Flippable Classes
Editor's Note:This post was co-authored by Aaron Sams, Managing Director of FlippedClass.com and founding member of the Flipped Learning Network. When the subject of the flipped class comes up, many educators see how it applies to academic subjects like math and science education, but don't realize that the methodology has applications in a wide array of other classes. According to a survey of 2358 teachers by the Flipped Learning Network and Sophia Learning (PDF, 1.2MB), 33 percent of those teachers who are flipping their classes are math teachers, 38 percent are science teachers, and 23 percent teach English language arts and social studies. But can you flip the other subjects? Can you flip an elementary classroom? The answer is a resounding yes. To flip the non-flippable classes, teachers need to ask this key question: What is the best use of my face-to-face time with students? Physical Education Jason Hahnstadt is a K-8 PE teacher at the Joseph Sears School in Illinois. Woodworking

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/flipping-the-non-flippable-classes-jon-bergmann

Related:  FlippedHow to do flippingaskerticInglés

Flipped-Learning Toolkit: 5 Steps for Formative Assessment Editor's Note: This post was co-authored by Aaron Sams, Managing Director of FlippedClass.com and founding member of the Flipped Learning Network. If you flip your class, you might be able to rid yourself of the bane of many teachers: grading papers late at night. Since the flipped classroom model moves teachers away from the "front of the room," they have more time to interact with students and implement a wide variety of instructional strategies -- including formative assessment. 5 Steps to Check for Mastery One formative assessment strategy has the side benefit of not taking papers home to grade. Flipped-Learning Toolkit: 3 Ways to Take Your Students Deeper Editor's Note: This post was co-authored by Aaron Sams, Managing Director of FlippedClass.com and founding member of the Flipped Learning Network. Flipped learning is more than just an efficient way to teach. It is also an opportunity to take students to deeper levels of comprehension and engagement. One of the most important benefits of flipped learning is that it takes the teacher away from the front of the room. No longer is class focused on information dissemination, but instead, time can be spent helping students with difficult concepts and extending the learning to deeper levels.

Classic Dip Recipe: Chile Con Queso Classic Dip Recipe: Chile Con Queso What good is a party without chips and dip? Of course, you could go to the food store and pick up jarred dip, but who knows what's in that? 7 free flipped classroom creation apps you might not know You might not know these apps for creating lessons, video, and more—perfect for the flipped classroom The flipped classroom gives students more time in class to do, not just listen, and gives teachers new opportunities to revamp their lessons in creative, multimedia ways for at-home consumption. But for all that you need the right tools. Here, we’ve gathered a handful of apps for content creation, from video to podcasting to slideshows, summarized on APPitic.com, an app resource site with more than 6,000 apps in more than 300 subcategories.

“Fliperentiated” Instruction: How to Create the Customizable Classroom In a rapidly changing learning landscape, educators of all stripes still coalesce around two steady beliefs: Students perform best under conditions that activate their preferred learning style. There is no greater predictor of success than a fantastic teacher. Effective teaching has long put the unique interests of the learner up front, allowing teachers to meet the needs of more students more of the time. Now, advocates of differentiated instruction have found a true partner in the form of flipped learning, the pedagogical approach in which direct instruction moves from the group learning space to the individual learning space. Call it "fliperentiated" instruction.

5 Ways to Share YouTube Videos Safely and Privately (Without the Distractions) Do you want to be able to use YouTube in your class, but are concerned about exposing students to the distractions that surround it? Worse yet, inappropriate content may be displayed, which is a huge concern for younger students in particular. Well I am here to provide a few approaches to solving that problem. Using Film to Teach Analysis Skills Growing up, my family's Sunday night ritual was always the single word, dinner-and-a-movie. We were passionate about cinema, and a post-movie debate was always included in the evening's entertainment. In fact, one of the most memorable fights with my dad was over his inability to delay his analysis of Hoosiers before the end credits had even rolled. Needless to say, it wasn't just the movies themselves that became like a different food group to me; it was the enthusiastic post-movie analysis that also gave me sustenance. During these talks, my sister and I brought in our prior knowledge from other books, from other movies, and from what few experiences we already had.

Flipped Classroom: Engaging Students with EdPuzzle The flipped classroom model is a blended learning strategy I use to present my vocabulary, writing, and grammar instruction online. Students watch videos at home where they can control the pace of their learning, then they come to class prepared to apply that information in collaborative student-centered activities. One thing I emphasize when I lead professional development for teachers is the importance of flipping and engaging.

Classroom Management and the Flipped Class Editor's Note:This post was co-authored by Aaron Sams, CEO of Sams Learning Designs, LLC and founding member of the Flipped Learning Network. Let's face it. We teachers spend far too much time and energy trying to keep students quiet so that they can listen to us. We have taken countless courses and workshops on classroom management in our careers, and it seems that the underpinning goal of classroom management is for teachers to keep kids quiet so that they can learn. Is there a better way to think about classroom management?

Related: