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Satanism

Satanism
The downward-pointing pentagram is often used to represent Satanism. Satanism is a broad term referring to a group of social movements comprising diverse ideological and philosophical beliefs. Their shared features include symbolic association with, or admiration for the character of Satan, and Prometheus, which are in their view, liberating figures. Eliphas Lévi's Sabbatic goat (known as The Goat of Mendes or Baphomet) has become one of the most common symbols of Satanism. Although the public practice of Satanism began with the founding of The Church of Satan in 1966, historical precedents exist: a group called the Ophite Cultus Satanas was founded in Ohio by Herbert Arthur Sloane in 1948.[3] Original Satanic practice, however, is intended to be independent. Satanist groups that appeared after the 1960s are widely diverse, but two major trends are theistic Satanism and atheistic Satanism. Theistic Satanism[edit] Luciferianism[edit] Palladists[edit] Our Lady of Endor Coven[edit] Islam[edit] Related:  intriguing

Satanic ritual abuse Engraving by Henry de Malvost in the book "Le Satanisme et la Magie" by Jules Bois depicting a Black mass, part of an earlier moral panic of religious desecration and Satanic ceremonies that was a precursor to the satanic ritual abuse moral panic of the late 20th century Satanic ritual abuse (SRA, sometimes known as ritual abuse, ritualistic abuse, organised abuse, sadistic ritual abuse and other variants) was a moral panic that originated in the United States in the 1980s, spreading throughout the country and eventually to many parts of the world, before subsiding in the late 1990s. Allegations of SRA involved reports of physical and sexual abuse of people in the context of occult or Satanic rituals. At its most extreme definition, SRA involved a worldwide conspiracy involving the wealthy and powerful of the world elite in which children were abducted or bred for sacrifices, pornography and prostitution. History[edit] Historical precedents[edit] Conspiracy accusations[edit]

Tantra in America About Tantra in America and the Tantrik Order (From "Spiritual Sex: Secrets of Tantra from the Ice Age to the New Millennium", published by the Pocket Books division of Simon & Schuster, copyright 1997, all rights reserved.) Dr. Bernard | The "Tantrik Order In America" | Controlling Forces | Charter Document | New Tantric Order | Underneath the Seal are thirty-three lines written in flowery English. At the bottom, under the heading "Supreme Instructors" and listed from first to fifth, are five names alongside which is written more encoded glyphs (presumably the magical signatures or names of these five personages), and the information that these are "Of the Tantrik Priesthood". At either side are two wax seals and the whole composition is held between two rising cobras (symbols of the Kundalini-energy of Tantric tradition) and intricate geometrical motifs. The thirty-three lines in English read as follows: "OM! That which has been covered has been revealed to him. New Tantric Order "OM!

Palmistry Palmistry, or chiromancy (also spelled cheiromancy; from Greek kheir (χεῖρ, ός; “hand”) and manteia (μαντεία, ας; “divination”)), is the claim of characterization and foretelling the future through the study of the palm, also known as palm reading or chirology. The practice is found all over the world, with numerous cultural variations. Those who practice chiromancy are generally called palmists, palm readers, hand readers, hand analysts, or chirologists. The information outlined below is briefly representative of modern palmistry; there are many ― often conflicting ― interpretations of various lines and palmar features across various schools of palmistry. History[edit] Ancient palmistry[edit] Palmistry is a practice common to many different places on the Eurasian landmass;[1] it has been practised in the cultures of India, Tibet, China, Persia, Sumeria, Ancient Israel and Babylonia. Modern palmistry[edit] Cheiro, an influential exponent of palmistry in the late 19th century. Lines[edit]

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Thelema The word thelema is the English transliteration of the Koine Greek noun θέλημα (pronounced [θélima]) "will", from the verb θέλω "to will, wish, purpose." As Crowley developed the religion, he wrote widely on the topic, producing what are collectively termed the Holy Books of Thelema. He also included ideas from occultism, Yoga and both Eastern and Western mysticism, especially the Qabalah.[8] Historical precedents[edit] The word θέλημα (thelema) is rare in classical Greek, where it "signifies the appetitive will: desire, sometimes even sexual",[9] but it is frequent in the Septuagint.[9] Early Christian writings occasionally use the word to refer to the human will,[10] and even the will of God's opponent, the Devil,[11] but it usually refers to the will of God.[12] One well-known example is in the "Lord's Prayer" (Matthew 6:10), “Your kingdom come. François Rabelais[edit] François Rabelais was a Franciscan and later a Benedictine monk of the 16th century. Aleister Crowley[edit]

Baphomet "Bahomet" redirects here. It is not to be confused with Bahamut. The 19th century image of a Sabbatic Goat, created by Eliphas Levi. The arms bear the Latin words SOLVE (separate) and COAGULA (join together), i.e., the power of "binding and loosing" usurped from God and, according to Catholic tradition, from the ecclesiastical hierarchy acting as God's representative on Earth. The original goat pentagram first appeared in the book "La Clef de la Magie Noire" by French occultist Stanislas de Guaita, in 1897. This symbol would later become synonymous with Baphomet, and is commonly referred to as the Goat of Mendes or Sabbatic Goat. Baphomet (/ˈbæfɵmɛt/; from Medieval Latin Baphometh, Baffometi, Occitan Bafometz) is a term originally used to describe an idol or other deity that the Knights Templar were accused of worshiping, and that subsequently was incorporated into disparate occult and mystical traditions. §History[edit] The name Baphomet comes up in several of these confessions.

Lucifer Lucifer (/ˈluːsɪfər/ or /ˈljuːsɪfər/) is the King James Version rendering of the Hebrew word הֵילֵל in Isaiah 14:12.[1] This word, transliterated hêlêl[1] or heylel,[2] occurs only once in the Hebrew Bible[1] and according to the KJV-influenced Strong's Concordance means "shining one, morning star, Lucifer".[2] The word Lucifer is taken from the Latin Vulgate,[3] which translates הֵילֵל as lucifer,[Isa 14:12][4][5] meaning "the morning star, the planet Venus", or, as an adjective, "light-bringing".[6] The Septuagint renders הֵילֵל in Greek as ἑωσφόρος[7][8][9][10][11] (heōsphoros),[12][13][14] a name, literally "bringer of dawn", for the morning star.[15] In this passage Isaiah applies to a king of Babylon the image of the morning star fallen from the sky, an image he is generally believed to have borrowed from a legend in Canaanite mythology.[16] Etymology, Lucifer or morning star[edit] "How you have fallen from heaven, morning star, son of the dawn! J. Isaiah 14:12[edit] Judaism[edit]

Thaumaturgy Religious views[edit] Christianity[edit] In original Greek writings, the term thaumaturge referred to several Christian saints. This is usually translated into English as "wonderworker", a saint through whom God works miracles, not just occasionally, but as a matter of course. It was even said that God raises up not more than one every century. Famous ancient Christian thaumaturges include Saint Gregory of Neocaesarea, also known as Saint Gregory Thaumaturgus, Saint Menas of Egypt, Saint Nicholas of Myra, Saint Seraphim of Sarov, Saint Anthony of Padua, Saint Ambrose of Optina, Saint Gerard Majella and Saint John of Kronstadt. Islam[edit] In Sunni, Shia, and Sufi Islam, a Tay al-Ard (literally "folding up of the earth") is a saint miraculously teleporting, or "moving by the earth being displaced under one's feet." Magic[edit] In the 16th century, the word thaumaturgy entered the English language meaning miraculous or magical powers. Hermetic Qabalah[edit] Philosophy[edit] See also[edit]

Theistic Satanism The history of theistic Satanism, and assessments of its existence and prevalence in history, is obscured by it having been grounds for execution at some times in the past, and due to people having been accused of it who did not consider themselves to worship Satan, such as in the witch trials in Early Modern Europe. Most of theistic Satanism exists in relatively new models and ideologies, and many claiming to not be involved with Christianity at all.[4][5][6] Possible history of theistic Satanism[edit] The worship of Satan was a frequent charge against those charged in the witch trials in Early Modern Europe and other witch-hunts such as the Salem witch trials. Satanism and crime[edit] John Allee, founder of the First Church of Satan,[28] equates some of the “violent fringe” of Satanism as “Devil worshipers” and “reverse Christians”. Values in theistic Satanism[edit] Self-development is important to theistic Satanists. Diversity of viewpoints within theistic Satanism[edit]

Church of Satan: The Official Web Site Holy Guardian Angel The term Holy Guardian Angel was possibly coined either by Abraham of Worms, a German Cabalist who wrote a book on ceremonial magick during the 15th century or Samuel Liddell MacGregor Mathers, the founder of the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, who later translated this manuscript and elaborated on this earlier work, giving it extensive magical notes, but the original concept goes back to the Zoroastrian Arda Fravaš ('Holy Guardian Angels').[citation needed] In Mathers' publication of The Book of the Sacred Magic of Abramelin the Mage, he writes: "If thou shalt perfectly observe these rules, all the following Symbols and an infinitude of others will be granted unto thee by thy Holy Guardian Angel; thou thus living for the Honour and Glory of the True and only God, for thine own good, and that of thy neighbour. Later, author and occultist Aleister Crowley popularized the term within his religious and philosophical system of Thelema. Aleister Crowley's view[edit] Enochian view[edit]

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