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Converged Storage for VMware

Converged Storage for VMware
Imagine what you can achieve by combining the power of VMware vSphere with storage platforms designed to eliminate the challenges of server and client virtualization. HP’s next generation of Converged Storage solutions are designed to enhance the benefits of VMware vSphere, VMware View, and VMware vCloud Solutions. With HP storage supporting your VMware deployments, you are able to: Optimize VM density, availability and business continuity Simplify provisioning and management with less storage and vSphere complexity Save on storage by increasing capacity utilization and efficiency HP Converged Storage for VMware Environments HP 3PAR StoreServ Storage—delivers best-in-class, hardware-assisted integration with VMware vSphere along with guarantees to double your VM density and cut your capacity requirements in half. HP StoreOnce Backup—reduces backup data in vSphere environments by up to 20x by eliminating duplicated data. HP VirtualSystem Solution brief (PDF 274 KB) Increasing VM density

http://www8.hp.com/us/en/products/data-storage/data-storage-solutions.html?compURI=1285027#.VGAQWtF-P0N

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VMworld 2014 VMware vCloud Air and ViPR Object Storage This one is short and sweet! The vCloud Hybrid Service is no more, and is now VMware vCloud Air! Furthermore – it keeps getting bigger (more locations), and better (more capabilities – DR as a Service, Backup as a Service, and Platform as a Service) – with one of the new additions being one of the industries’ richest web-scale, geo-dispersed and efficient - which can translate into the lowest cost model – object (and HDFS!) store! No cloud service is really complete without PaaS and Object stores – and it’s great that the vCloud Air service is getting them… What is delivering the underlying Object/HDFS Storage?

VMware's Virtual SAN Threatens Traditional Data Storage Models VMware has launched the final part of its software defined data center puzzle: a virtual SAN product called Virtual SAN. The product has been in beta testing for the last six months, with around 12,000 customers, but there were still plenty of surprise announcements made at the launch event on March 6. The biggest of these was the maximum size of its Virtual SAN. Previously VMware had said that this would be 8 server nodes, and then 16. But VMware CEO Pat Gelsinger announced that the product has been upgraded to support 32 nodes. Now for some math.

VMware storage: SAN configuration basics VMware storage entails more than simply mapping a logical unit number (LUN) to a physical server. VMware’s vSphere enables system administrators to create multiple virtual servers on a single physical server chassis. The underlying hypervisor, vSphere ESXi, can use both internal and external storage devices for guest virtual machines. Storage and Server Virtualization from DataCore and VMware Experience SANs with the highest availability, fastest performance and fullest utilization Virtually everything hinges on storage. VMware® vSphere™ and VMware® View™, in particular, place extraordinary demands on it. Too often, disks slow down, interrupt or endanger these centralized IT operations not because they are poorly designed or built, but because they are physically constrained. VMware Virtual Infrastructure helps you to overcome similar limitations in CPU and memory however when it comes to advanced functions such as workload migration, load balancing, fail-over and disaster recovery, server virtualization is completely dependent on highly available (HA) shared storage. You will be shocked at the high hardware costs and major overhaul generally proposed to put such a storage infrastructure in place.

VMware vSphere Storage Appliance (VSA) for Shared Storage End of Availability VMware is announcing the End of Availability of all vSphere Storage Appliance versions, effective April 1, 2014. After this date you will no longer be able to purchase this product. All support and maintenance for vSphere Storage Appliance 5.5 will be unaffected and will continue to follow the Enterprise Infrastructure Support Policy. The End of General Support life date for customers with vSphere Storage Appliance 5.5 remains September 19, 2018. Support contracts can be renewed beyond End of Availbaility until End of General Support. Customers interested in moving to a new VMware software-defined storage solution may elect to upgrade to VMware Virtual SAN.

VMware Storage Integration & Top Storage Vendors Research done in collaboration with Stuart Miniman and Nick Allen Introduction In April 2011 Wikibon ran a survey looking at the area of storage and VMware. The results showed that EMC and NetApp had a clear lead in the number of respondents that selected them as the best VMware storage and as the primary VMware storage vendor. Wikibon has further analyzed the results of the survey, including a detailed analysis of the degree of integration. The findings of this analysis were similar to the first report, that EMC and NetApp were the leading storage vendors in integration of storage and VMware.

VMware wants to be the VMware of Networking « IT 2.0 By Massimo, on April 17th, 2012 There have been a lot of discussions lately about SDN (Software Defined Networking). Arguably SDN may mean a lot of different things to a lot of different people. If you ask the like of Facebook, Google and academic researchers they will probably tell you that SDN is all about gaining full visibility (and control) on how packets flow on the network. People and organizations that are closer to the commercial world may tell you that SDN is all about creating an abstraction layer (virtualization anyone?)

VMware Storage and Software-defined Storage (SDS) Solutions Blog Posts Oregon State University, a public institution with more than 26,000 students and growing VDI workloads wanted a high performance storage tier for their VDI environment. However, they wanted the solution to be up and running before the school summer session began, along with being easy to operate and scale on an on-going basis, without requiring large upfront investments. Continue reading Welcome to the next installment of our vSphere PowerCLI 5.8 walkthrough series of the new cmdlets for vSphere Storage Policy Based Management. untitled As an architect, I talk to many vendors and customers, and often the conversation is about what makes one storage vendor better than another for VMware. I’m not going to focus on performance and array types of features, but what I do want to cover is the integration points that storage vendors can offer between their products and VMware. When it comes to VMware storage integrations, it comes down to two questions. First, can the storage device do what others can– and if so, then what are the table stakes? Second, what integrations can a vendor offer that’s unique to that vendor? And to qualify as a VMware integration point, I think it must be something that improves intelligence, manageability, performance, or automation.

Unable to bond Etherchannel on ESXi 5.5 I couldn't seem to get an etherchannel working properly on a ESXi5.5 host, I'm not using vcenter and was attempting to aggregate the links to a Cisco 3750. I referred to the kb article below, I configured IP hash on the ESXi host, set SRC-DST-IP aggregation algorithm on the switch, and disabled LACP, however when I disabled LACP per the guide, I lost connectivity altogether to the ESXi host, although all of the ports in the etherchannel showed '(P)' and actually correctly established a bundle. If I re-configured the etherchannel to enable LACP, I could ping and connect to the host, however all of the ports in the etherchannel are showing '(I)' which means operating independently. So I presume its the host configuration rather than the switch configuration which is incorrect but can anyone advise? KB Article: VMware KB: Sample configuration of EtherChannel / Link Aggregation Control Protocol (LACP) with ESXi/ESX and Cisco/H…

Connect to VMWare virtual machines using Remote Desktop Had a short training on VMWare on Tuesday, the software development department finally got the official permission (read: get a license) to use VMWare Workstation. I’m no stranger to Virtual Machines (VMs) – started playing with Virtual PC 2005 a fwe years back and I understood the general concepts of hardware virtualization. The biggest problem I have with VMs in general is the slowness; I’d rather develop directly on my PC, which is faster. Can’t say I’ve delved deep into it, but I know enough to utilize it and be dangerous Regardless, virtual machines provide a way to simulate multiple computers and I’ve done 3-tier software testing (client to app server using WCF and app server to SQL 2005 backend) to verify our framework can support both 2-tier (client –> DB) and 3-tier deployments. Rarely used it for development, again due to speed.

Configuring a Virtual Network Features | Documentation | Knowledge Base | Discussion Forums Prev Contents Last Next The first topics in this section give you a quick look at the virtual networking components that VMware Workstation provides and show how you can use them with your virtual machine. The rest of the section provides more detail on some networking capabilities and specialized configurations.

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