background preloader

38 Question Starters based on Bloom’s Taxonomy - Curriculet

38 Question Starters based on Bloom’s Taxonomy - Curriculet
Curriculet is free for teachers and students. Get started here. This is the 2nd post in a series on how to write better curriculets (and literacy curriculum). Our first post can be found here. In this blog post, Lindsey Howe shares some of the best practices she has developed as a teacher and curriculet writer. Lindsey is one of Curriculet’s first writers and she has taught high school English for 8 years. Using Bloom’s Taxonomy to Write Curriculets By Lindsey Howe, Curriculet writer and teacher During the five months I have been writing for Curriculet, I have experimented with many different ways to tackle question-crafting. While looking for ways to improve my questions, I discovered this list of 38 question starters based on Bloom’s Taxonomy. List of Question Starter Based on Bloom’s Taxonomy This list moves through the 6 taxonomy levels with questions for each one. Level 1: Remember – Recalling Information Question Starters: What is…? Can you explain why…? What would happen if…?

http://www.curriculet.com/blog/38-question-starters-based-blooms-taxonomy/

How We Think: John Dewey on the Art of Reflection and Fruitful Curiosity in an Age of Instant Opinions and Information Overload by Maria Popova “To maintain the state of doubt and to carry on systematic and protracted inquiry — these are the essentials of thinking.” Decades before Carl Sagan published his now-legendary Baloney Detection Kit for critical thinking, the great philosopher, psychologist, and education reformer John Dewey penned the definitive treatise on the subject — a subject all the more urgently relevant today, in our age of snap judgments and instant opinions. In his 1910 masterwork How We Think (free download; public library), Dewey examines what separates thinking, a basic human faculty we take for granted, from thinking well, what it takes to train ourselves into mastering the art of thinking, and how we can channel our natural curiosity in a productive way when confronted with an overflow of information.

5 Common Misconceptions About Bloom's Taxonomy 5 Common Misconceptions About Bloom’s Taxonomy by Grant Wiggins, Authentic Education Admit it–you only read the list of the six levels of the Taxonomy, not the whole book that explains each level and the rationale behind the Taxonomy. Not to worry, you are not alone: this is true for most educators. Upgrade your KWL Chart to the 21st Century One of the take aways from the Curriculum Mapping Institute this past week was that it brought an upgrade to THE trusted KWL (Know, What to Know and Learned) Chart to the forefront. It seems a no brainer…one of those things… “I should have thought about it”… So what is this upgrade all about? An “H” snuck into the Acronym! What does this “H” stand for”?Why is this an upgrade for the 21st century? I started out by searching Google, which immediately wanted to correct my search term and showed me the traditional “KWL chart” results.

5 Ways to Help Your Students Become Better Questioners The humble question is an indispensable tool: the spade that helps us dig for truth, or the flashlight that illuminates surrounding darkness. Questioning helps us learn, explore the unknown, and adapt to change. That makes it a most precious “app” today, in a world where everything is changing and so much is unknown. And yet, we don’t seem to value questioning as much as we should. kolb's learning styles, experiential learning theory, kolb's learning styles inventory and diagram We have some very exciting plans for Businessballs. Later this month, we will be launching a new visual identity, refreshing the design of the site and adding lots of new functionality to enhance your learning experience. Phase 2 will include badges, learning plans linked to accredited competency frameworks, wikis (for collaborative content development) and new content from international thought leaders and academics. The site will continue to follow our ethos of free work and life learning, and the redevelopment and ongoing management will be delivered by our partner Accipio. If you are interested in contributing content or your view on where we should take businessballs next, please email ask@businessballs.com. David Kolb's learning styles model and experiential learning theory (ELT)

249 Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs For Critical Thinking Bloom’s Taxonomy’s verbs–also know as power verbs or thinking verbs–are extraordinarily powerful instructional planning tools. In fact, next to the concept of backwards-design and power standards, they are likely the most useful tool a teacher-as-learning-designer has access to. Why? They can be used for curriculum mapping, assessment design, lesson planning, personalizing and differentiating learning, and almost any other “thing” a teacher–or student–has to do. For example, if a standard asks students to infer and demonstrate an author’s position using evidence from the text, there’s a lot built into that kind of task.

The Importance of Asking Questions to Promote Higher-Order Competencies Irving Sigel devoted his life to the importance of asking questions. He believed, correctly, that the brain responds to questions in ways that we now describe as social, emotional, and cognitive development. Questions create the challenges that make us learn. The essence of Irv's perspective is that the way we ask questions fosters students' alternative and more complex representations of stories, events, and circumstances, and their ability to process the world in a wider range of ways, to create varying degrees of distance between themselves and the basis events in front of them, is a distinct advantage to learning.

A Clever Trick to Play YouTube Videos without Distractive Features YouTube is both a video resource for educational clips to use with your students in the classroom and also a robust video editor to work on your clips before you share them with the world. Recently some extra useful services have been added to YouTube such as creating presentations with audio embedded in them, and live streaming a Google Plus hangout. However, while YouTube is free for everyone to use, it comes with another cost. Those annoying ads forced at you every time you want to watch a video together with the "recommended videos " for you, are part of the cost users pay for using the service. Using YouTube videos with students means that you might run the risk of exposing them to inappropriate and distractive content that comes in the featured playlist to the left of the video. The textual comments under the video can also be offensive and featuring vulgar language not appropriate for our students.

Questions Before Answers: What Drives a Great Lesson? Recently, I was looking through my bookshelves and discovered an entire shelf of instruction books that came with software I had previously purchased. Yes, there was a time when software was bought in stores, not downloaded. Upon closer examination of these instruction books, I noticed that many of them were for computers and software that I no longer use or even own. More importantly, most were still in shrink-wrap, never opened. I recalled that when I bought software, I just put the disk into the computer and never looked at the book. I realized that I did the same when I bought a new car -- with one exception.

Related: