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US History, American History

US History, American History
Log In | My Passes | Sign Up Literature Bible Poetry Shakespeare Mythology Bestsellers Dr. Seuss Pre-Algebra Algebra Algebra II Geometry Biology US History Flashcards DMV Careers SAT ACT AP Exams En Español Essay Lab Videos Literary Critics Shmoop Shtuff Advertisement The Civil War In 1861, the American Civil War began with fighting in South Carolina.

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Roaring Twenties The 1920s era went by such names as the Jazz Age, the Age of Intolerance, and the Age of Wonderful Nonsense. Under any moniker, the era embodied the beginning of modern America. Numerous Americans felt buoyed up following World War I (1914-1918). America had survived a deadly worldwide influenza epidemic (1918). a Program of the National Park Service NEW! Arthurdale: A New Deal Community Experiment Explore Arthurdale, West Virginia, and discover a town founded during the Great Depression when First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt championed subsistence homestead communities for struggling Americans across the country. In this lesson, learn about the impoverished Appalachian mining town that Arthurdale's homesteaders left and the Progressive-era theories about communal work, school, and rural life they tested at their new home.

Making of America aking of America (MoA) is a digital library of primary sources in American social history from the antebellum period through reconstruction. The collection is particularly strong in the subject areas of education, psychology, American history, sociology, religion, and science and technology. The collection currently contains approximately 10,000 books and 50,000 journal articles with 19th century imprints. For more details about the project, see About MoA. Making of America is made possible by a grant from the Andrew W. JAZZ A Film By Ken Burns: Jazz in Time - Roaring Twenties Roaring Twenties excerpted from Jazz: A History of America's Music The decade following World War I would one day be caricatured as "the Roaring Twenties," and it was a time of unprecedented prosperity — the nation's total wealth nearly doubled between 1920 and 1929, manufactures rose by 60 percent, for the first time most people lived in urban areas — and in homes lit by electricity.

Parable of the Polygons - a playable post on the shape of society This is a story of how harmless choices can make a harmful world. These little cuties are 50% Triangles, 50% Squares, and 100% slightly shapist. But only slightly! Multiple Perspectives of the War Elementary One Class Period Program Segments June 1812 Declaration of War (6 minutes) Summer 1812 The Americans Invade (18 ½ minutes)September 1813 The Americans Invade Canada – Again (7 ½ minutes)Winter 1814 New Orleans (7 minutes)1815 Peace (4 minutes) Today in History: July 30 Henry Ford Old Zeke Perkins sold his hogs the other day, The gosh-darned fool threw his money right away; Rode into town, sittin' on a board, Came home ridin' in a brand-new Ford! Automobile manufacturer Henry Ford was born July 30, 1863, on his family's farm in what is present-day Dearborn, Michigan. From the time that he was a young boy, Ford enjoyed tinkering with machines.

The Persistence of Myth: The Causes of the Civil War Although there is little controversy among historians about the centrality of slavery in causing the Civil War, the myth of a “debate” persists. And with President Trump’s recent, historically inaccurate comments about the Civil War, this issue has once again been dragged into the spotlight, galling historians and history teachers. The notion that there is any controversy only serves to advance the ideology of white nationalists and so-called Lost Causers. In promoting this “alternative” view, these groups seek to undermine the role of slavery in secession, in the development of American capitalism and even in the creation of the United States. As historian James W.

Inside the White House "This is really what the White House is all about. It’s the “People’s House.” It’s a place that is steeped in history, but it’s also a place where everyone should feel welcome. And that's why my husband and I have made it our mission to open up the house to as many people as we can." – Michelle Obama History Photographs from the Golden Age of Jazz The Library of Congress Music Division, Library of Congress Search by Keyword | Browse by Name | Subject | Venue The William P. Learning Resources from Monticello: Jefferson and the Declaration of Independence In early May, 1776, Jefferson traveled to Philadelphia to be a delegate to the Second Continental Congress. After a week’s journey, he arrived in Philadelphia. He was thirty-three years old, the youngest member of the Congress.

Harlem Renaissance During the early 20th century, African-American poets, musicians, actors, artists and intellectuals moved to Harlem in New York City and brought new ideas that shifted the culture forever. During the early 20th century, African-American poets, musicians, actors, artists and intellectuals moved to Harlem in New York City and brought new ideas that shifted the culture forever. From approximately 1918 to the mid 1930s, talent began to overflow within this newfound culture of the black community in Harlem, as prominent figures—Langston Hughes, Duke Ellington and Billie Holiday, to name a few—pushed art to its limit as a form of expression and representation.

Learning Resources from Monticello: Jefferson and the end of the American Revolution Jefferson's Hand Telescope A Jefferson family story relates that Jefferson used this telescope to see British soldiers swarming in the streets of Charlottesville in 1781. Click to enlarge Thomas Jefferson Returns to Virginia In September 1776, Thomas Jefferson left Congress.

Infamous Mobsters Bootleggers, smugglers, drug dealers, hit men—all these occupations are the provenance of mobsters, who operate in ethnic, family and business networks. Bootleggers, smugglers, drug dealers, hit men—all these occupations are the provenance of mobsters, who operate in ethnic, family and business networks. Mobsters' real life crimes, and Hollywood's fascination with them, has earned them a special place in the American imagination.

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