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6.00 Introduction to Computer Science and Programming, Fall 2008

6.00 Introduction to Computer Science and Programming, Fall 2008
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Python Programming Python Programming From Wikibooks, open books for an open world Jump to: navigation, search This book describes Python, an open-source general-purpose interpreted programming language available for a broad range of operating systems. Contents[edit] Intro[edit] Overview Getting Python Setting it up Interactive mode Self Help Basics[edit] Creating Python programs Variables and Strings Basic syntax Sequences (Strings, Lists, Tuples, Dictionaries, Sets) Data types Numbers Strings Lists Tuples Dictionaries Sets Basic Math -- redundant to "Operators" Operators Control Flow Decision Control Conditional Statements Loops Functions Scoping Input and output Files Text Modules Classes Exceptions Errors Source Documentation and Comments Idioms Advanced[edit] Decorators Context Managers Reflection Metaclasses Namespace Tips and Tricks Modules[edit] Standard library modules[edit] Standard Library Regular Expression External commands XML Tools Email Threading Sockets GUI Programming Tkinter CGI interface WSGI web programming Extracting info from web pages Math

For Beginners Welcome! Are you completely new to programming? If not then we presume you will be looking for information about why and how to get started with Python. Fortunately an experienced programmer in any programming language (whatever it may be) can pick up Python very quickly. Installing Python is generally easy, and nowadays many Linux and UNIX distributions include a recent Python. If you want to know whether a particular application, or a library with particular functionality, is available in Python there are a number of possible sources of information. If you have a question, it's a good idea to try the FAQ, which answers the most commonly asked questions about Python. If you want to help to develop Python, take a look at the developer area for further information.

The Python Tutorial Python is an easy to learn, powerful programming language. It has efficient high-level data structures and a simple but effective approach to object-oriented programming. Python’s elegant syntax and dynamic typing, together with its interpreted nature, make it an ideal language for scripting and rapid application development in many areas on most platforms. The Python interpreter and the extensive standard library are freely available in source or binary form for all major platforms from the Python Web site, and may be freely distributed. The Python interpreter is easily extended with new functions and data types implemented in C or C++ (or other languages callable from C). This tutorial introduces the reader informally to the basic concepts and features of the Python language and system. For a description of standard objects and modules, see The Python Standard Library. The Glossary is also worth going through.

BeginnersGuide/NonProgrammers Python for Non-Programmers If you've never programmed before, the tutorials on this page are recommended for you; they don't assume that you have previous experience. If you have programming experience, also check out the BeginnersGuide/Programmers page. Books Each of these books can be purchased online and is also available as a completely free website. Automate the Boring Stuff with Python - Practical Programming for Total Beginners by Al Sweigart is "written for office workers, students, administrators, and anyone who uses a computer to learn how to code small, practical programs to automate tasks on their computer." Interactive Courses These sites give you instant feedback on programming problems that you can solve in your browser. CheckiO is a gamified website containing programming tasks that can be solved in either Python 2 or 3. K-12 Oriented (for Children) Build a "Pypet" Learn programming fundamentals in Python while building a tamagotchi style "Pypet" by Tatiana Tylosky. Videos

PythonTurtle Instant Python This is a minimal crash-course in the programming language Python. To learn more, take a look at the documentation at the Python web site, www.python.org; especially the tutorial. If you wonder why you should be interested, check out the comparison page where Python is compared to other languages. This introduction has been translated into several languages, among them Portuguese, Italian, Spanish, Russian, French, Lithuanian, Japanese, German and Greek, and is currently being translated into Norwegian, Polish, and Korean. Since this document still might undergo changes, these translations may not always be up to date. Note: To get the examples working properly, write the programs in a text file and then run that with the interpreter; do not try to run them directly in the interactive interpreter - not all of them will work. To begin with, think of Python as pseudo-code. x,y,z = 1,2,3 first, second = second, first a = b = 123 The first two examples are equivalent. Simple, isn’t it? print b

A Python Book: Beginning Python, Advanced Python, and Python Exercises 2.2 Regular Expressions For more help on regular expressions, see: 2.2.1 Defining regular expressions A regular expression pattern is a sequence of characters that will match sequences of characters in a target. The patterns or regular expressions can be defined as follows: Literal characters must match exactly. Because of the use of backslashes in patterns, you are usually better off defining regular expressions with raw strings, e.g. r"abc". 2.2.2 Compiling regular expressions When a regular expression is to be used more than once, you should consider compiling it. import sys, re pat = re.compile('aa[bc]*dd') while 1: line = raw_input('Enter a line ("q" to quit):') if line == 'q': break if pat.search(line): print 'matched:', line else: print 'no match:', line Comments: We import module re in order to use regular expresions.re.compile() compiles a regular expression so that we can reuse the compiled regular expression without compiling it repeatedly. 2.2.3 Using regular expressions Notes:

Benefits of this Interactive Textbook — How to Think like a Computer Scientist: Interactive Edition This interactive book is a product of the Runestone Interactive Project at Luther College, led by Brad Miller and David Ranum. There have been many contributors to the project. Our thanks especially to the following: This book is based on the Original work by: Jeffrey Elkner, Allen B. Downey, and Chris MeyersActivecode based on SkulptCodelens based on Online Python TutorMany contributions from the CSLearning4U research group at Georgia Tech.ACM-SIGCSE for the special projects grant that funded our student Isaac Dontje Lindell for the summer of 2013.NSF The Runestone Interactive tools are open source and we encourage you to contact us, or grab a copy from GitHub if you would like to use them to write your own resources.

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