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BBC History - William Shakespeare

BBC History - William Shakespeare

http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/people/william_shakespeare/

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William Shakespeare William Shakespeare (/ˈʃeɪkspɪər/;[1] 26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616)[nb 1] was an English poet, playwright, and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.[2] He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon".[3][nb 2] His extant works, including some collaborations, consist of about 38 plays,[nb 3] 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and a few other verses, the authorship of some of which is uncertain. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.[4] Shakespeare produced most of his known work between 1589 and 1613.[6][nb 4] His early plays were mainly comedies and histories and these works remain regarded as some of the best work produced in these genres. Many of his plays were published in editions of varying quality and accuracy during his lifetime. Life

Full synopsis Romeo and Juliet was written in 1595-6 and is set in Verona, Italy, at a time when a longstanding feud between two noble families - the Montagues and the Capulets - constantly breaks out into brawling on the streets. Prince Escalus, ruler of Verona, threatens terrible punishment on anyone who takes part in further violence. Young Romeo Montague is hopelessly in love with the unattainable Rosaline and, in an attempt to cure his lovesick misery, his friends persuade him to go disguised to a party at the home of his family's sworn enemies, the Capulets. Romeo reluctantly agrees to go when he learns that Rosaline has been invited. At the party, he meets Juliet, only daughter of the Capulets, and not even knowing each other's names, they fall instantly in love.

How to make Shakespeare easy for English language learners Have you ever had difficulty relating Shakespeare to learners of English? Tutor and resource writer Genevieve White comes to the rescue, in time for Shakespeare Day and English Language Day today. Last year, I wrote an article extolling the joys of teaching Shakespeare to learners of English and outlining the reasons why teachers should bring the Bard into the classroom. Some of the comments I received on this post suggested that the linguistic challenges presented by sixteenth-century English are just too great to overcome. Shakespeare Facts: 50 Interesting Facts About William Shakespeare Interested in Shakespeare facts? Below is a range of 50 little known facts about William Shakespeare. Bear in mind that very little in the way of hard facts is actually known about Shakespeare’s life (unlike facts about Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, which are fairly well documented), but we’ve researched long and hard to come up with a range of interesting facts about the great man: William Shakespeare Facts: 1

96 Incredibly Useful Links for Teaching and Studying Shakespeare The idea of tackling Shakespeare in school has sometimes sent chills down both students’ and teachers’ spines, but the truth is that studying Shakespeare doesn’t have to be so daunting. His plays and sonnets are filled with themes that are relevant even today, are humorous, lyrical, and provide important historical content. Most importantly, Shakespeare knew how to tell a good story. Whether you are teaching or learning Shakespeare in a traditional classroom, in an online course, in high school, or college, there are resources below that will make teaching and learning about Shakespeare and fun and engaging experience. Comprehensive Resources

Welcome to Shakespeare High: Your Shakespeare Classroom on the Internet! HIGH: used in composition with adjectives to heighten or emphasize their signification, as, high- fantastical HIGHT: called HILD: held HILDING: a paltry fellow HINT: suggestion HIREN: a prostitute. with a pun on the word 'iron.' HIT: to agree HOISE: to hoist, heave up on high HOIST: hoisted HOLP: to help; helped HOME: to the utmost HONEST: chaste HONESTY: chastity HONEY-STALKS: the red clover HOODMAN-BLIND: the game now called blindman's-buff HORN-MAD: probably, 'harn-mad,' that is, brain-mad HOROLOGE: a clock HOT-HOUSE: a brothel HOX: to hamstring HUGGER-MUGGER: secrecy HULL: to drift on the sea like a wrecked ship HUMOROUS: fitful, or, perhaps, hurried HUNT-COUNTER: to follow the scent the wrong way HUNTS-UP: a holla used in hunting when the game was on foot HURLY: noise, confusion HURTLE: to clash HURTLING: noise, confusion HUSBANDRY: frugality Management HUSWIFE: a jilt

Shakespeare Insult Generator: Thou Shall Say It Like Shakespeare Advertisement How would you like to be able to whip out a Shakespeare insult on the fly whenever necessary? This is such an oldie but a goodie. Shakespeare in American Communities Shakespeare lived during a remarkable period of English history, a time of relative political stability that followed and preceded eras of extensive upheaval. Elizabeth I became the Queen of England in 1558, six years before Shakespeare's birth. During her 45-year reign, London became a cultural and commercial center where learning and literature thrived. When Queen Elizabeth ascended to the throne, there were violent clashes throughout Europe between Protestant and Catholic leaders and their followers. Though Elizabeth honored many of the Protestant edicts of her late father, King Henry VIII, she made significant concessions to Catholic sympathizers, which kept them from attempting rebellion. But when compromise was not possible, she was an exacting and determined leader who did not shy away from conflict.

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