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Why “Psychological Androgyny” Is Essential for Creativity

Why “Psychological Androgyny” Is Essential for Creativity
by Maria Popova “Creative individuals are more likely to have not only the strengths of their own gender but those of the other one, too.” Despite the immense canon of research on creativity — including its four stages, the cognitive science of the ideal creative routine, the role of memory, and the relationship between creativity and mental illness — very little has focused on one of life’s few givens that equally few of us can escape: gender and the genderedness of the mind. In Creativity: The Psychology of Discovery and Invention (public library) — one of the most important, insightful, and influential books on creativity ever written — pioneering psychologist Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi examines a curious, under-appreciated yet crucial aspect of the creative mindset: a predisposition to psychological androgyny. Illustration by Yang Liu from 'Man Meets Woman,' a pictogram critique of gender stereotypes. Click image for details. Illustration from the 1970 satirical book 'I’m Glad I’m a Boy!

http://www.brainpickings.org/2014/11/07/psychological-androginy-creativity-csikszentmihalyi/

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