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What Is Web 2.0

What Is Web 2.0
by Tim O'Reilly 09/30/2005 Oct. 2009: Tim O'Reilly and John Battelle answer the question of "What's next for Web 2.0?" in Web Squared: Web 2.0 Five Years On. The bursting of the dot-com bubble in the fall of 2001 marked a turning point for the web. Many people concluded that the web was overhyped, when in fact bubbles and consequent shakeouts appear to be a common feature of all technological revolutions. Shakeouts typically mark the point at which an ascendant technology is ready to take its place at center stage. The concept of "Web 2.0" began with a conference brainstorming session between O'Reilly and MediaLive International. In the year and a half since, the term "Web 2.0" has clearly taken hold, with more than 9.5 million citations in Google. This article is an attempt to clarify just what we mean by Web 2.0. In our initial brainstorming, we formulated our sense of Web 2.0 by example: The list went on and on. 1. Netscape vs.

http://www.oreilly.com/pub/a/web2/archive/what-is-web-20.html

Related:  Sistemas colaborativosmedia theoryWeb 2.0Evaluate & Cite Resources

List of social software From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This is a list of notable social software: selected examples of social software products and services that facilitate a variety of forms of social human contact. Blogs[edit] Clipping[edit] Instant messaging[edit] Not 2.0? Tim Bray writes: I just wanted to say how much I’ve come to dislike this “Web 2.0” faux-meme. It’s not only vacuous marketing hype, it can’t possibly be right. In terms of qualitative changes of everyone’s experience of the Web, the first happened when Google hit its stride and suddenly search was useful for, and used by, everyone every day. The second—syndication and blogging turning the Web from a library into an event stream—is in the middle of happening.

Web 2.0 A tag cloud (a typical Web 2.0 phenomenon in itself) presenting Web 2.0 themes. An interactive version is available here. Web 2.0 describes World Wide Web sites that use technology beyond the static pages of earlier Web sites. The term was coined in 1999 by Darcy DiNucci and was popularized by Tim O'Reilly at the O'Reilly Media Web 2.0 conference in late 2004.[1][2] Although Web 2.0 suggests a new version of the World Wide Web, it does not refer to an update to any technical specification, but rather to cumulative changes in the way Web pages are made and used.

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From Work to Play Play Suspended This essay got its start in my keynote remarks for the Digital Arts and Culture Conference in the Spring of 2001 and took its present form during the Summer and Fall of that unforgettable year. Those were not easy months in which to think about changes in media and culture, however momentous. With the implosion of the Internet bubble, the future that had recently looked so glorious tumbled suddenly from promise to delusion.

Wiki "Wiki format" redirects here. For the type of markup language, see Wiki markup. A wiki ( i/ˈwɪki/ WIK-ee) is a website that provides collaborative modification of its content and structure directly from the web browser. Invisible Web: What it is, Why it exists, How to find it, and Its inherent ambiguity To find out more about an author: Google the author's name or dig deeper in the library's biographical source databases. To find scholarly sources: When searching library article databases, look for a checkbox to narrow your results to Scholarly, Peer Reviewed or Peer Refereed publications. To evaluate a source's critical reception: Check in the library's book and film review databases to get a sense of how a source was received in the popular and scholarly press.

Game Studies 0102: Sims, BattleBots, Cellular Automata, God and Go. By Celia Pearce A Conversation with Will Wright by Celia Pearce Conducted in Will Wright's office at Maxis, September 5, 2001 CP: What is your philosophy of interactive design?

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