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David Crystal on English Idioms by Shakespeare

David Crystal on English Idioms by Shakespeare

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qm2QwsJDbLo

Related:  William Shakespeare and Renaissance languageLanguage ChangeWilliam Shakespeare

Why Shakespeare loved iambic pentameter - David T. Freeman and Gregory Taylor While interesting to explore in his plays, the idea of Shakespeare as a poet isn’t new. He wrote many poems. Most famously, he penned 154 sonnets that are often as studied and celebrated as his plays. His sonnets feature a specific format that uses iambic pentameter to reflect great meaning and emotion in a short burst of verse. If it’s the words themselves that grab you, take a plunge down the rabbit hole of Open Source Shakespeare: a beautiful marriage of the bard and technology that allows you to search every poem and play Shakespeare ever wrote for individual words and phrases.

Words and Phrases Coined by Shakespeare Words and Phrases Coined by Shakespeare NOTE: This list (including some of the errors I originally made) is found in several other places online. That's fine, but I've asked that folks who want this on their own sites mention that I am the original compiler. For many English-speakers, the following phrases are familiar enough to be considered common expressions, proverbs, and/or clichés. All of them originated with or were popularized by Shakespeare.

Visit Shakespeare’s London at FIU’s new virtual reality facility It’s 1598, and you’re on your way to the Globe Theater to watch one of Shakespeare’s plays. You walk along the dirt roads and the green fields of London and you realize you can see the London Bridge in the distance. A vagabond asks you for a coin, and you find the village houses and the town market bustling with customers. Once you arrive at the theater, you watch the first few minutes of the opening monologue of “Henry V.” This is a virtual world created by a multidisciplinary team of FIU students – and you can immerse yourself in this time-travel journey starting Jan. 29 when the I-CAVE opens at Modesto A.

Breaking the Masonic Code of SHAKE-SPEARES SONNETS Breaking the Masonic Code of SHAKE-SPEARES SONNETS By Richard Allan WagnerCopyright © 2013 Hopefully you, the reader, have come into this discourse as a reasonable and unbiased individual—a seeker of Truth. Texts in Context Texts in Context is a rich and unusual collection of over 400 British Library texts. It includes menus for medieval banquets and handwritten recipes scribbled inside book covers. It opens up the first English dictionary ever written and explores the secret language of the Georgian underworld. It allows you to examine the shopping lists of the East India Company and to practise sentences from colonial phrasebooks.

Using Film Clips to Teach Shakespeare “Double, double, toil and trouble / Fire burn and cauldron bubble.”: The Weird Sisters (Andrew Zox, Cleo House, Jr., and Eric Hissom) in Macbeth at Folger Theatre (2008). Folger Shakespeare Library. By Chris Lavold E. A. Abbott, A Shakespearean Grammar, PREFACE TO THIRD EDITION. THE success which has attended the First and Second Editions of the SHAKESPEARIAN GRAMMAR, and the demand for a Third Edition within a year of the publication of the First, has encouraged the Author to endeavour to make the work somewhat more useful, and to render it, as far as possible, a complete book of reference for all difficulties of Shakespearian syntax or prosody. For this purpose the whole of Shakespeare has been re-read, and an attempt has been made to include within this Edition the explanation of every idiomatic difficulty (where the text is not confessedly corrupt) that comes within the province of a grammar as distinct from a glossary. The great object being to make a useful book of reference for students, and especially for classes in schools, several Plays have been indexed so fully that with the aid of a glossary and historical notes the references will serve for a complete commentary. E. A.

Ripper Letters Ripper Letters During the Autumn of Terror hundreds of letters were sent to the police and local press purporting to be written by the Whitechapel fiend. Most of them were deemed to be fakes written by either newspaper men trying to start a story or fools trying to incite more terror. Many Ripperologists believe them all to be hoaxes. Macbeth Lesson Plans, Macbeth Quizzes, Help with Macbeth, Macbeth Resources, Macbeth and witches ShakespeareHelp.com: Macbeth Macbeth Links Comprehensive PowerPoint Presentation on Macbeth - 144 slides Quizzes - Quotes - Characters Imagery - Themes - YouTube Videos Available for Immediate Download M. W. MacCallum, Shakespeare's Roman Plays and their Background, Preface, chapter 1, section 1 Shakespeare's Roman plays may be regarded as forming a group by themselves, less because they make use of practically the same authority and deal with similar subjects, than because they follow the same method of treatment, and that method is to a great extent peculiar to themselves. They have points of contact with the English histories, they have points of contact with the free tragedies, but they are not quite on a line with either class. It seems, therefore, possible and desirable to discuss them separately. In doing so I have tried to keep myself abreast of the literature on the subject; which is no easy task when one lives at so great a distance from European libraries, and can go home only on hurried and infrequent visits.

English spellings don’t match the sounds they are supposed to represent. It’s time to change If you set out to create the most complicated spelling system in the world, then you could hardly do better than English. English spelling was messed about with in the 15th century when it became reinstated as our official language. Foreign printers with imperfect knowledge of English compounded the felony during the Bible wars of the 16th century, and the early lexicographers made little attempt to match spellings consistently with the sounds they were supposed to represent. Welcome to Shakespeare High: Your Shakespeare Classroom on the Internet! HIGH: used in composition with adjectives to heighten or emphasize their signification, as, high- fantastical HIGHT: called HILD: held HILDING: a paltry fellow HINT: suggestion HIREN: a prostitute. with a pun on the word 'iron.' HIT: to agree HOISE: to hoist, heave up on high HOIST: hoisted HOLP: to help; helped HOME: to the utmost HONEST: chaste HONESTY: chastity HONEY-STALKS: the red clover HOODMAN-BLIND: the game now called blindman's-buff HORN-MAD: probably, 'harn-mad,' that is, brain-mad HOROLOGE: a clock HOT-HOUSE: a brothel HOX: to hamstring HUGGER-MUGGER: secrecy HULL: to drift on the sea like a wrecked ship HUMOROUS: fitful, or, perhaps, hurried HUNT-COUNTER: to follow the scent the wrong way HUNTS-UP: a holla used in hunting when the game was on foot HURLY: noise, confusion HURTLE: to clash HURTLING: noise, confusion HUSBANDRY: frugality Management HUSWIFE: a jilt

Why do we have silent letters in the English language? - Features - Books Silent 'e' (eg, tot vs tote) is a bit more of a complicated story. In Chaucer's day, the 'e' was pronounced. So, in a word like 'bite' (not a real old-English example, but simpler for exposition) the 'e' at the end would have meant that the word was pronounced bi.te, with two syllables. In the Germanic language, open syllables had long vowels, so 'bit' would be short 'i', 'bite' would be long. Nowadays, the distinction between long and short vowels in English is actually more than just length because of the Great Vowel Shift. So, whereas before, 'bite' would have been something like 'beetuh', the Great Vowel Shift and the eventual elision of the final 'e' makes its modern pronunciation 'byt' – silent 'e'.

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