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The Disease of Being Busy

The Disease of Being Busy
I saw a dear friend a few days ago. I stopped by to ask her how she was doing, how her family was. She looked up, voice lowered, and just whimpered: “I’m so busy… I am so busy… have so much going on.” Almost immediately after, I ran into another friend and asked him how he was. Again, same tone, same response: “I’m just so busy… got so much to do.” The tone was exacerbated, tired, even overwhelmed. And it’s not just adults. After we settled in, we went to one of the friendly neighbors, asking if their daughter and our daughter could get together and play. Horribly destructive habits start early, really early. How did we end up living like this? Whatever happened to a world in which kids get muddy, get dirty, get messy, and heavens, get bored? How did we create a world in which we have more and more and more to do with less time for leisure, less time for reflection, less time for community, less time to just… be? Somewhere we read, “The unexamined life is not worth living… for a human.” W.

http://www.onbeing.org/blog/the-disease-of-being-busy/7023

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lifehack We all think about success, and we should, because the road to self-improvement comes from within, not from some exterior source. It is a good idea to be introspective and to strive to pinpoint bad habits as well as good ones, not just in a business sense, but also in private life situations. Still, introspecting only gets us so far. Trapping yourself inside your head and trying to figure everything out by yourself is usually not the best approach. This is why we study our role models and strive to see what it is that they do in their everyday lives that makes them so successful. Einstein’s God: Krista Tippett and Theoretical Cosmologist Janna Levin on Free Will, Science, and the Human Spirit by Maria Popova “How we ask our questions affects the answers we arrive at… Science and religion… ask different kinds of questions altogether, probing and illuminating in ways neither could alone.” Seven decades after a little girl asked Einstein whether scientists pray, Peabody Award-winning journalist Krista Tippett began interviewing some of the world’s most remarkable scientists, philosophers, and theologians about the relationship between science and spirituality in her superb public radio program On Being — the same trove of wisdom that gave us Sherwin Nuland on what everybody needs and Joanna Macy on how Rilke can help us live more fully. Tippett, who was awarded the National Humanities Medal for her ennobling work, collected the best of these dialogues in Einstein’s God: Conversations About Science and the Human Spirit (public library) — an immeasurably rewarding compendium featuring such contemporary luminaries as Parker Palmer, Freeman Dyson, Andrew Solomon, and Sherwin Nuland.

How Popular Music's Lyrics Perpetuate American Idiocy Claire Bernish (ANTIMEDIA) A recent study served to confirm the patently obvious: song lyrics for the most popular genres of music are ridiculously obtuse — and getting worse over time. Though this might not be a revelation, the figures are distressing indicators of both an intellectually vapid societal and cultural future as well as its apparent inevitability. If you’ve already moved away from Billboard music, congratulations, you refuse to be insulted. But if you haven’t, or if you’re concerned about pop culture trends acting as portents of systemic dysfunction, you should probably pay attention. Andrew Powell-Morse of SeatSmart studied the “Lyric Intelligence” of 225 Billboard songs in the Pop, Country, Hip-hop, and Rock genres that spent three or more weeks parked at the top of the charts to analyze any changes over the course of ten years.

10 Things Emotionally-Intelligent People Do Not Do  Emotional intelligence is probably the most powerful yet undervalued trait in our society. We believe in rooting our everyday functions in logic and reason, yet we come to the same conclusions after long periods of contemplation as we do in the blink of an eye. Our leaders sorely overlook the human element of our socio-political issues and I need not cite the divorce rate for you to believe that we’re not choosing the right partners (nor do we have the capacity to sustain intimate relationships for long periods of time).

18 Ways Women Disconnect with Themselves. ~ Falan Storm Via Falan Stormon Apr 4, 2014 We live in a society where our relationship to things outside of ourselves seems far more important than our relationship to ourselves. We pride ourselves on our families, our jobs, our labels and our outward expressions in the world. Not only do these matter, but they can often be sincere expressions of who we really are. Forget Facebook, Abandon Instagram, Move To A Village By Diane Cole / npr.org In the parts of the world that we cover in our blog, many people live in villages. Villages have their problems, to be sure. There may not be a doctor or clinic nearby. Girls may not be able to go to school. Clean water might be a long walk away.

7 Simple Truths to Hijack Your Bad Habits and Shake You Awake  This is your invitation to wake up. This is the tap on your shoulder, the unexpected epiphany, the whisper in your ear, the serendipitous encounter, and the sign on the side of the road that you have been looking for. Below are seven ideas to hijack any habits which may be keeping you stuck. Join me as we celebrate the sweet victory of your chains falling to the ground, disempowering all that has been keeping you bound. It’s time to get out of your own silly way. 1.

How to Create the Quiet (because it's noisy out there) Mark and I took a walk around Silver Lake (pictured above) recently, and the peace and quiet was as beautiful as the view. Everything seemed to slow down, and the quieter it was outside, the quieter it became inside. My heart rate slowed down, and the mental chatter disappeared. Why Do People Defend Unjust, Inept, and Corrupt Systems? By Science Daily / sciencedaily.com Why do we stick up for a system or institution we live in -- a government, company, or marriage -- even when anyone else can see it is failing miserably? Why do we resist change even when the system is corrupt or unjust? A new article in Current Directions in Psychological Science, a journal published by the Association for Psychological Science, illuminates the conditions under which we're motivated to defend the status quo -- a process called "system justification." System justification isn't the same as acquiescence, explains Aaron C.

8 Mental Habits the Most Successful People Learn to Break Sometimes success comes not from what you learn to do but what you learn to stop doing. That bit of wisdom comes from Sandja Brugmann, serial entrepreneur and founder ofThe Passion Institute, a recently launched online educational and program and consultancy for executives and entrepreneurs. “Once we have developed understanding of how we interfere with our visions and goals, then comes the challenging process of unlearning and changing specific behaviors,” she explains. Unlearning is hard work. “It requires to move out of automatic behaviors and into conscious understanding where we take control of our own actions and lives,” Brugmann says.

A Helpful Guide to Becoming Unbusy “Those who are wise won’t be busy, and those who are too busy can’t be wise.” ― Lin Yutang It was in this video from Jeff Shinabarger that I first heard the phrase, “‘Busy’ has become the new ‘Fine’.” As in, when you ask somebody how they were doing, they used to answer, “Fine.” We'd Have Revolution If People Understood This Martin Luther King, Jr. was working towards a guaranteed basic income for all when he was killed. Wealth inequality, neoliberalism, the actions of the Federal Reserve, along with the greed and theft of the global elite have made the call for a guaranteed basic income for all even more urgent in 2014 than in the 1960s. David DeGraw, interviewed here by Dennis Trainor, Jr. of Acronym TV claims the alternative is a violent revolution. In his new book, The Economics of Revolution, DeGraw writes: “Having that much wealth consolidated within a mere 1% of the population, while a record number of people toil in poverty and debt, is a crime against humanity.

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