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EdX (@edXOnline)

EdX (@edXOnline)

https://twitter.com/edxonline

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edX Drops Plans to Connect MOOC Students With Employers – Wired Campus - Blogs Can taking a MOOC help a student land a better job? Proponents of the massive open online courses hope so. Each of the major MOOC providers—Coursera, edX, and Udacity—has expressed interest in helping connect employers to well-qualified job applicants who succeed in their online courses. How edX Plans to Earn, and Share, Revenue From Free Online Courses - Technology By Steve Kolowich How can a nonprofit organization that gives away courses bring in enough revenue to at least cover its costs? That's the dilemma facing edX, a project led by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that is bringing in a growing number of high-profile university partners to offer massive open online courses, or MOOCs. Two other major providers of MOOCs, Coursera and Udacity, are for-profit companies.

Twitter: How to archive event hashtags and create an interactive visualization of the conversation Jisc CETIS MASHe The use of Twitter to collecting tweets around an event hashtag allowing participants to share and contribute continues to grow and has even become part of mass media events, various TV shows now having and publicising their own tag. This resource is often lost in time, only tiny snippets being captured in blog posts or summaries using tools like Storify, which often loose the richness of individual conversations between participants. It doesn’t have to be this way.

Harvard and MIT Put $60-Million Into New Platform for Free Online Courses – Wired Campus - Blogs The group of elite universities offering free online courses just got bigger. Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology today announced a partnership that will host online courses from both institutions free of charge. The platform, its creators say, has the potential to improve face-to-face classes on the home campuses while giving students around the world access to a blue-ribbon education. The new venture, called edX, grew out of MIT’s announcement last year that it would offer free online courses on a platform called MITx. The combined effort will be overseen by a nonprofit organization governed equally by both universities, each of which has committed $30-million to the project. Anant Agarwal, director of MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, who led the development of MITx, will serve as edX’s first president.

The Complete Guide To Twitter Hashtags For Education What is a hashtag? A word or phrase preceded by a “#.” How do hashtags work? Twitter can be a busy place with lots of tweets–and thus lots of “noise.” A #hashtag is a way to aggregate tweets that are appended with a hashtag. Picture it like a magnet that attracts all messages categorized by that topical word or phrase. Margaret Weigel: 5 Ideas for EdX, Harvard and MIT's New Online Initiative On May 2nd, the education world welcomed EdX, Harvard and MIT's $60 million online partnership that promises to upend higher education as we know it. At the launch event, MIT President Susan Hockfield, Harvard President Drew Faust and a handful of project administrators outlined a collaboration intended to enhance learning for both residential and online students via shared content on an open-source platform. Projects like EdX suggest that information not only wants to be free, lots of intrepid learners want it to be free as well. Helping that smart but poor kid in Cambodia/Cameroon/Canada (with a robust internet connection) gain access to great teaching materials is a noble cause.

INFOGRAPHIC: How Major Players in the MOOC-iverse Get Their Game On It’s not just students and higher ed institutions flocking to the MOOC extravaganza. Venture capitalists, foundations, companies, and non-profit orgs are also getting in on the action. The Chronicle produced this spectacular infographic that helps illustrate the huddle around the experiment. We would have loved to see some of the other players like University of the People and Udemy in the mix, but this is a good start. [The Chronicle]

Major players in online education market Major players in online education market Comparing Khan Academy, Coursera, Udacity, & edX missions, offerings September 4, 2012 With most new markets comes competition, as is the case with online education. Today, there are four major platforms that produce content specifically for online instruction: Coursera, Udacity, and edX, which provide university-level content, and Khan Academy, which largely targets K-12 education.

Cambridge's MOOC Rock Star, EdX Head Anant Agarwal, Disrupts Higher Ed Business Model Anant Agarwal speaks at the TEDx conference in Edinburgh, Scotland, in June 2013. (Credit: TEDx under a Creative Commons license.) In the land of higher education, where you might find brilliant professors wearing tweed coats with elbow patches, Anant Agarwal is a bit of a rock star. Agarwal is president of EdX, Harvard and MIT's $60 million online-learning venture. Last year, Agarwal taught the nonprofit's first massive open online course, 6002, a course on circuits and electronics.

How EdX plans to earn, and share, revenue from its free online courses How can a nonprofit organization that gives away courses bring in enough revenue to at least cover its costs? That's the dilemma facing edX, a project led by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology that is bringing in a growing number of high-profile university partners to offer massive open online courses, or MOOCs. Two other major providers of MOOCs, Coursera and Udacity, are for-profit companies. While edX has cast itself as the more contemplative, academically oriented player in the field, it remains under pressure to generate revenue. "Even though we are a nonprofit, we have to become self-sustaining," said Anant Agarwal, president of edX. And developing MOOCs, especially ones that aspire to emulate the quality and rigor of traditional courses at top universities, is expensive.

UNESCO Chair in Education & Technology for Social Change Two edX partnership models – compared to Coursera edX offers its partners a choice of 2 partnership models. Both models give universities the opportunity to make money from their edX MOOCs—but only after edX gets paid. 1)”University self-service model,” allows a participating university to use edX’s platform as a free LMS for a course on the condition that part of any revenue from it goes to edX. The courses can be created by any individual professor and branded as “edge” courses .

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