background preloader

Research and Citation Tools for Students

Research and Citation Tools for Students
Jump to navigation Updated Privacy Policy Donate Check out what's new in: Bookmark Related Top Picks Displaying 1 - 9 of 9. Best Apps for Kids with Autism Find tools to help kids build important social and communication skills. Grades Pre-K - 12 English Language Arts Communication & Collaboration, Character & SEL 10 Best ELA Tools for Middle School 10 top-rated apps and websites for the middle school ELA classroom. Grades 6 - 8 English Language Arts, English Language Learning Communication & Collaboration, Tech Skills Best Common Core ELA Tools for High School Outstanding high school-level apps, games, and websites aligned to ELA Common Core standards. Grades 9 - 12 Communication & Collaboration, Creativity, Critical Thinking Best Common Core ELA Tools for Middle School Magnificent middle school-level apps, games, and websites aligned to ELA Common Core standards. Communication & Collaboration, Critical Thinking Best Common Core ELA Tools for Elementary Schoolers Grades Pre-K - 5 Grades 2 - 12 See All Top Picks

https://www.graphite.org/top-picks/research-and-citation-tools-for-students

Related:  ISS Learning CommonsResearching, Evaluating & Citing Sources

Two Very Good Book Search Engines for Teachers May 11, 2015 In today’s post we are sharing with you two good platforms where you can search for and find online free and premium books. As for Free Book Search tool listed below , this is a specific search engine designed to help you find free ebooks, audiobooks, and Kindle books. This tool is also integrated with Google Drive allowing you to conduct your book search right in your Drive. The second tool we have in this list is the popular Google Play Books. This platform combines both an enhanced reading experience together with advanced book search functionalities. You can use its store to search over 4 million books. Search Better: Evaluate a Webpage Practice Practice evaluating information Many pages may seem reliable at first, but as you evaluate them you may find that they actually aren't. By looking for clues on different parts of a webpage, you can decide whether it is a reliable source.

Going Retro: Reading Apps for Real Books Reading Rainbow app YouTube clips. Texting. Twitter. Facebook status updates. The prevalence of short-attention-span media — easily scanned or consumed — has led to much hand-wringing over how students will develop that lifelong love of reading perceived to be so critical to lifelong learning. Research and Citation If you are having trouble locating a specific resource please visit the search page or the Site Map. Conducting Research These OWL resources will help you conduct research using primary source methods, such as interviews and observations, and secondary source methods, such as books, journals, and the Internet. This area also includes materials on evaluating research sources. Using Research These OWL resources will help you use the research you have conducted in your documents.

23 Great Library Blogs Let’s say that you are a school librarian, and let’s say you’ve decided that like many of the teachers in your school, you too are ready to use a blog to connect with parents and students, to share your latest news and events, or perhaps to develop your own personal learning network (PLN). You’re motivated and ready to begin, but you may have some lingering questions about the best way to get started and maybe you’re not entirely sure how to organize your new blog. Unfortunately, searching the internet for “how to create a great library blog” doesn’t yield many helpful answers. There are some sites that come up in that search that appear useful, but overall it seems to make more sense to just visit library blogs, see what works and what doesn’t, and craft your blog around the ideas you like the best. To make that process easier, we’ve compiled a list of library blogs on Edublogs.

What Is Web 2.0 by Tim O'Reilly 09/30/2005 Oct. 2009: Tim O'Reilly and John Battelle answer the question of "What's next for Web 2.0?" in Web Squared: Web 2.0 Five Years On. Borrow Modern eBooks Click here to skip to this page's main content. Hello! Open Library is participating in our eBook lending program.

University of Wisconsin-Whitewater The Library utilizes LibGuides to assemble useful information for courses, popular topics of research, databases, and much more. All may be copied freely for fair use, except those which are marked as having been created elsewhere. Citation Guides Visit the new Citing Sources guide, your one-stop-shop for citation styles, formatters, and generators, as well as information on annotated bibliographies.

Metaphors and Threshold Concepts for Research — Katie Day I asked the audience at Research Relevance to suggest new metaphors -- and here are some responses: a search engine like Google is like "trail mix" - returning results include some M&Ms, some raisins, some peanuts - while a database is like a whole bag of M&Ms -- all good resultsa group project is like a music quartet - each contributing to the whole beautiful sounda database is like a bathtub filled with water for a particular size and purpose, while Google is like a river, whose flow is unpredictable and aimless I particularly like (the dead white male professor) Kenneth Burke's description of the metaphor of the "unending conversation" of academic discourse -> "Imagine that you enter a parlor. You come late.

Invisible Web: What it is, Why it exists, How to find it, and Its inherent ambiguity To find out more about an author: Google the author's name or dig deeper in the library's biographical source databases. To find scholarly sources: When searching library article databases, look for a checkbox to narrow your results to Scholarly, Peer Reviewed or Peer Refereed publications. To evaluate a source's critical reception: Check in the library's book and film review databases to get a sense of how a source was received in the popular and scholarly press. To evaluate internet sources: The internet is a great place to find both scholarly and popular sources, but it's especially important to ask questions about authorship and publication when you're evaluating online resources.

Getting to E: The State of the School Ebook Market Illustration by Ken Orvidas. By fits and starts, school libraries are moving toward ebook adoption; the question is how fast. While publishers and distributors are evolving their offerings to appeal to students and educators, the transition to ebooks has its challenges, ranging from inadequate technology to some students’ preference for print books. Still, the movement is definitively toward e, as an anticipated $30-million deal for e-materials between Amazon and the New York City Department of Education shows. OverDrive, a leading distributor of ebooks to schools and libraries, saw its highest-ever single day of checkouts—more than 500,000 ebooks—in June, according to David Burleigh, the company’s director of marketing.

Related: