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Research and Citation Tools for Students

Research and Citation Tools for Students
Jump to navigation Updated Privacy Policy Donate Check out what's new in: Bookmark Related Top Picks Displaying 1 - 9 of 9. Best Apps for Kids with Autism Find tools to help kids build important social and communication skills. Grades Pre-K - 12 English Language Arts Communication & Collaboration, Character & SEL 10 Best ELA Tools for Middle School 10 top-rated apps and websites for the middle school ELA classroom. Grades 6 - 8 English Language Arts, English Language Learning Communication & Collaboration, Tech Skills Best Common Core ELA Tools for High School Outstanding high school-level apps, games, and websites aligned to ELA Common Core standards. Grades 9 - 12 Communication & Collaboration, Creativity, Critical Thinking Best Common Core ELA Tools for Middle School Magnificent middle school-level apps, games, and websites aligned to ELA Common Core standards. Communication & Collaboration, Critical Thinking Best Common Core ELA Tools for Elementary Schoolers Grades Pre-K - 5 Grades 2 - 12 See All Top Picks Related:  ISS Learning Commons

Writing Commons instaGrok: Research Concept Mapping Guide to Copyright and Fair Use A five-part series When it comes to copyright law and the application of fair use exceptions, ignorance is definitely not bliss! Learn how to educate yourselves and your students and avoid making a costly mistake! You really did plan to find time over the summer to familiarize yourself with the latest information on copyright law. So now you have a student who wants to include audio of a Beatles song in a multimedia presentation about the 1960s, another who wants to include the poem "Casey at the Bat" in a report on the World Series, and a third who wants to post photographs of Biden and Obama to the class Web site. What's an educator to do? Click Part 1: Copyrights and Copying Wrongs below to begin. Who Said That? Article by Linda Starr Education World® Copyright © Education World

How to Cite Images on Your Blog When using Copyrighted work with written permission from owner… Used with permission from “name” , URL link to original source and or owner online presence. Ex. Used with permission from Silvia Tolisano When using images licensed under Creative Commons… Image licensed under Creative Commons by “name or username “. Ex. When using an image falling under Public Domain, you are not required to cite the creator/owner of the work. Image from Public Domain by “name”. When using images claiming Fair Use, you have to give full credit to original creator , with name as well as link to original source (ex. Image used, claiming Fair Use. Click to enlarge poster. Related Teaching Students About Using Images off Wikipedia We want our students to start creating... 1. In "Digital Images" Citing an Image is Not Enough! 1. In "Copyright" So... 7.

Teaching Adolescents How to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information An essential part of online research is the ability to critically evaluate information. This includes the ability to assess its level of accuracy, reliability, and bias. In 2012, my colleagues and I assessed 770 seventh graders in two states to study these areas, and the results definitely got our attention. Middle school students are more concerned with content relevance than with credibility They rarely attend to source features such as author, venue, or publication type to evaluate reliability and author perspective When they do refer to source features in their explanations, their judgments are often vague, superficial, and lacking in reasoned justification Other studies highlight similar shortcomings of high school and college students in these areas (see, for example, a 2016 study from Stanford). So what can you do to more explicitly teach adolescents how to evaluate the quality of online information? Dimensions of Critical Evaluation Modeling and Practice Prompting

Collection Development | Professional Tools ALCTS Resources for Library Collections Links to books offered or written by ALCTS, and resources for serials collections. Chief Collection Development Officers of Large Research Libraries IG Forum for discussing the various collection development and collection management issues of concern to large research libraries and exchanging information on new developments, techniques, and problems in managing the development of library collections. Membership is limited. --Sponsored by ALCTS CMDS Collection Development Librarians of Academic Libraries IG Forum for discussing collection development and management in academic and research libraries. An information network limited to librarians who perform collection development functions in all academic and research libraries not included in the Chief Collection Development Officers of Large Research Libraries Interest Group.

Research and Citation If you are having trouble locating a specific resource please visit the search page or the Site Map. Conducting Research These OWL resources will help you conduct research using primary source methods, such as interviews and observations, and secondary source methods, such as books, journals, and the Internet. This area also includes materials on evaluating research sources. Using Research These OWL resources will help you use the research you have conducted in your documents. APA Style These OWL resources will help you learn how to use the American Psychological Association (APA) citation and format style. MLA Style These OWL resources will help you learn how to use the Modern Language Association (MLA) citation and format style. Chicago Manual of Style This section contains information on the Chicago Manual of Style method of document formatting and citation. American Medical Association (AMA) Style

21st-Century Libraries: The Learning Commons Libraries have existed since approximately 2600 BCE as an archive of recorded knowledge. From tablets and scrolls to bound books, they have cataloged resources and served as a locus of knowledge. Today, with the digitization of content and the ubiquity of the internet, information is no longer confined to printed materials accessible only in a single, physical location. Libraries are reinventing themselves as content becomes more accessible online and their role becomes less about housing tomes and more about connecting learners and constructing knowledge. From Library to Learning Commons Printed books still play a critical role in supporting learners, but digital technologies offer additional pathways to learning and content acquisition. The design and implementation of the new library at Chicago's Francis W. Rather than focusing on the role that their library had played in the past, Francis W. Photo credit: Francis W. Transparent Learning Hubs Extending the Physical with Digital

Format & Generate Citations – APA, MLA, & Chicago How Can Your Librarian Help Bolster Brain-Based Teaching Practices? Flickr/Kevin Harber Inquiry-based learning has been around in education circles for a long time, but many teachers and schools gradually moved away from it during the heyday of No Child Left Behind. The pendulum is beginning to swing back towards an inquiry-based approach to instruction thanks to standards such as Common Core State Standards for math and English Language Arts, the Next Generation Science Standards and the College, Career and Civic Life (C3) Framework for Social Studies State Standards. “This is so new for teachers, whereas librarians have been doing this for ten years,” said Paige Jaeger, a school librarian turned administrator and co-author of Think Tank Library: Brain-Based Learning Plans for New Standards. As grade level and content-specific teachers begin to incorporate inquiry-based approaches into their classrooms, they should look to collaborate on lesson planning with their librarian, Jaeger said. “We have a limited capacity for short term recall,” Ratzen said.

Teaching Information/Research Skills in Elementary School | Langwitches Blog This post title is “Teaching Information/Research Skills in Elementary School”, but this post is as much for adults and older students. Many adults are overwhelmed with the quantity and new kind of media that is available and accessible through technology. Older students in High School and College might not feel overwhelmed, but have never been taught how to navigate, evaluate, save and retrieve the information that they are seeking. How and what kind of information skills do we need to start teaching in elementary school, that will grow and expand with our students as their grow older? What do teachers need to know in order to introduce and guide their students in a criticalefficienteffectivelysafeethical way as they navigating through the sea of information available? We need to help students develop these kind of information skills: locating informationevaluating informationlearning from informationusing (remix) information All About Explorers is well thought through. Reactions tend to vary.

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