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Teacher talk - Building and retaining vocabulary

Teacher talk - Building and retaining vocabulary

http://www.teachingenglish.org.uk/article/teacher-talk-building-retaining-vocabulary

Related:  VocabularyWordsDescribing photos, vocabulary and pronunciationspeaking

WORD GAMES Ammon Shea, a 37-year-old former furniture remover in New York, spent 12 months conquering what he describes as the Everest of dictionaries, the Oxford English Dictionary (OED), by ploughing through 20 volumes, 21,730 pages and 59 million words (read more here). We can only guess how much of what he read has stayed between his ears, which is, at times, quite a challenge for our students. Luckily for the latter, though, their word lists are much shorter. We can use some magic formulae for helping words stick in the head trying to come up with clever associations, getting students to use definitions, determining a rate at which words should be learnt without falling out of their heads, creating some “brain surprises” (see more here), or resort to some oldies but goldies – word games.

Word Up: The Must Dos of Vocabulary Instruction A while ago, I wrote a post called Doing It Differently: Tips for Teaching Vocabulary which spells out (get it?) the process and rationale for selecting certain vocabulary words and also describes six steps for teaching new words. Here, I'm going to add to that earlier musing on this topic by offering up some must dos that took me a few years down the teaching road to figure out. Must Do #1: Be Very Selective As for vocabulary lists, less is better. onlinelanguagecenterblog While catching up on some films and shows, I noticed a few school idioms and decided to do something different this week. So here is a list of some common classroom-based idioms that you may hear, read or hopefully, even use. A for effort 100 Whimsical Words by Mark Nichol The English language can be maddening to native speakers and learners alike, but is also delightfully rich, especially for those who seek to convey a lighthearted tone in their writing. Here are 100 words it’s difficult to employ without smiling. Though their meanings may be obscure, they each present a challenge — I mean an opportunity — for you to paint a vivid word picture. Imbue your musings with mirth by incorporating these terms:

The EFL SMARTblog: Describing photos (comparing, contrasting and speculating) You are going to practise language for; Describing photosComparing and contrasting photos (discussing similarities and differences)Speculating on what might be happeningReacting to photos (giving opinions) Discuss Look at the presentation. Follow the instructions and talk about some of the photos Write The language used here for comparing and contrasting / speculating is also useful for writing discussion / argument essays.

Asking For and Giving Street Directions English Exercise Introduction: Anybody who has travelled to another country or city has got lost. Sometimes maps don't help, so you have to ask somebody for directions. If you're in a country where they don't speak your language, this can be difficult. At other times, you will have to give directions to people visiting your country. In many cases, people just follow the direction the person was pointing to, and hope they will find the place they are looking for.

How to help English learners use linking expressions Would you like to help your learners speak more coherently? Svetlana Kandybovich, the latest winner of the British Council’s Teaching English blog award for a post on speaking skills, suggests some useful classroom activities. Learning to speak a language might seem fairly straightforward in principle: first you learn the words, then you form sentences using the correct grammar, finally you string the sentences together. Voilà! – you’re fluent.

Idioms – as clear as mud? Miranda Steel is a freelance ELT lexicographer and editor. She has worked as a Senior Editor for dictionaries for learners at OUP and has also worked for COBUILD. In this post, she looks at some of the weird and wonderful idioms in the English language. Idioms are commonly used in spoken and written English. Getting the whole class talking Getting the whole class talking Submitted by admin on 16 August, 2011 - 14:39 The following activities are designed to get everyone talking. They can be used with all levels because the language required to communicate is determined by the students. Remember to set up and demonstrate these activities carefully before letting the class go ahead. Jigsaw puzzle challenge

untitled By Laura Wallis for The Stir by CafeMom Kids can’t escape those vocab quizzes, but learning new words and perfecting spelling doesn’t have to be all work and no fun. If your family likes to play games together—whether on a car trip or just whiling away a morning on the sofa—add some word games to the mix. Here are a few that are fun for kids of all ages. 1The Letter Game This game can be played anywhere, with two or more people, and you don’t even need a pencil and paper. Start by picking a category, like animals or food. English Vocabulary Exercises Online, Printable Worksheets for Teachers and Fun Games ESL Lesson Plans & Resources for Kids Kiz School provides: Video Tutorials, PPT, Interactive Games & Quizzes, Printable PDF Worksheets & Flashcards, among others. You don't need to be a professional teacher to use our materials.It is an effective, affordable private and public teaching solution for parents and schools. English For Kids Free ESL for resources for kids are one of our best offers. Never again worry about lesson plan for young learners because we have free worksheets, Video Slides, Powerpoint presentations , Interactive Quizzes, Games for Classrooms , Flashcards, Kids Grammar, Reading & Spelling Worksheets and More to take off the burden of kids lesson planning.

Alphabet - audio-lingual method When I started teaching the English alphabet I was really sure that it will be fun and easy to achieve. My students had no problem learning the alphabet itself, but when they should have used it, they were making a lot of mistakes. I have tried everything. We tried using finger alphabet, some information gap exercises where spelling was necessary and so on. 20 Teen and Tween Conversation Starters How was your day? Fine. How was school? Good. How was your test?

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