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Synaptic Web

Synaptic Web
Stay updated about the Synaptic Web on Twitter via @SynapticWeb The Synaptic Web By Khris Loux, Eric Blantz, Chris Saad and you... The Internet is constantly evolving. As the speed, flexibility and complexity of connections increase exponentially, the Web is increasingly beginning to resemble a biological analog; the human brain. But what exactly is it that’s makes us, or the Web, smart? In the brain, neurologists now believe that it is the density and flexibility of the connections between neurons, not simply neurons themselves, which are at the root of intelligence. Even if the total number of brain cells, or neurons, begins to diminish in early adulthood, our ability to generate new connections between neurons and between different parts of the brain – what neurologist call “plasticity” - persists throughout life. Signs of the emerging Synaptic Web abound. The same is true for Social Networks. Social profiles are becoming real-time streams. Databases are becoming data peers.

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Related:  Neural Network

Crowd Computing and The Synaptic Web A couple of days ago David Gelernter – a known Computer Science Visionary who famously survived an attack by the Unabomber – wrote a piece on Wired called ‘The End of the Web, Search, and Computer as We Know It’. In it, he summarized one of his predictions around the web moving from a static document oriented web to a network of streams. Nova Spivack, my Co-founder and CEO at Bottlenose, also wrote about this in more depth in his blog series about The Stream. I’ve been interested in the work of David Gelernter for quite some time and thought this might be a good time to revisit some of his previous predictions. In 1999 he wrote a piece on Edge called ‘The Second Coming – A Manifesto’.

Web 3.0 A short story about the Semantic Web. Some Internet experts believe the next generation of the Web - Web 3.0 - will make tasks like your search for movies and food faster and easier. Instead of multiple searches, you might type a complex sentence or two in your Web 3.0 browser, and the Web will do the rest. For example, you could type "I want to see a funny movie and then eat at a good Mexican restaurant.

Collective Web In previous posts, especially in those related to content mapping, I frequently referred to collective actions and efforts in describing certain concepts, but never elaborated on the exact meaning of these terms. One could think that collectivity and collaboration are identical (they often are mentioned in the same context) as both have something to do with individuals working together. In fact, I find it important to highlight their differences for I expect collectivity to play as vital a role in Web 3.0 as collaboration did in Web 2.0. Transition As already understood from popular Web 2.0 applications such as Wikipedia, Google Docs, or WordPress, we define collaboration as sharing workload in a group of individuals who engage in a complex task, working towards a common goal in a managed fashion, and are conscious of the process’ details all the way.

The Ready Application of Neural Networks Neural networks (in theory) existed since the 1950's, but it wasn't until the mid-1980's thatalgorithms became sophisticated enough for real neural network applications. McCulloch and Pitts groundbreaking work, “ A Logical Calculus of the Ideas Immanent inNervous Activity ” lay the theoretical groundwork for neural network processing

Monsanto’s Dirty Dozen When you take a moment to reflect on the history of product development at Monsanto, what do you find? Here are twelve products that Monsanto has brought to market. See if you can spot the pattern… #1 – Saccharin Google and Neural Networks: Now Things Are Getting REALLY Interesting,… Back in October 2002, I appeared as a guest speaker for the Chicago (Illinois) URISA conference. The topic that I spoke about at that time was on the commercial and governmental applicability of neural networks. Although well-received (the audience actually clapped, some asked to have pictures taken with me, and nobody fell asleep) at the time it was regarded as, well, out there. After all, who the hell was talking about – much less knew anything about – neural networks.

Workplace Social Software Analyst Report Learn, Collaborate, Connect, Close: Best-in-Class Mobile Sales Enablement For as long as sales and account management professionals have closed deals and supported customers, they have traveled to client locations, business events, and tradeshows. Today’s business-to-business (B2B) front-line staffers are empowered more than ever with technology platforms, applications, and connectivity enablers to help them “seal the deal” more efficiently than ever before. Collective Intelligence in Neural Networks and Social Networks « 100 Trillion Connections Context for this post: I’m currently working on a social network application that demonstrates the value of connection strength and context for making networks more useful and intelligent. Connection strength and context are currently only rudimentarily and mushily implemented in social network apps. This post describes some of the underlying theory for why connection strength and context are key to next generation social network applications. A recent study of how behavioral decisions are made in the brain makes it clear how important strengths of connections are to the intelligence of networks. “Scientists at the University of Rochester, Washington University in St. Louis, and Baylor College of Medicine have unraveled how the brain manages to process the complex, rapidly changing, and often conflicting sensory signals to make sense of our world.

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