background preloader

The Hidden Brain: How Ocean Currents Explain Our Unconscious Social Biases

The Hidden Brain: How Ocean Currents Explain Our Unconscious Social Biases
by Maria Popova “Those who travel with the current will always feel they are good swimmers; those who swim against the current may never realize they are better swimmers than they imagine.” Biases often work in surreptitious ways — they sneak in through the backdoor of our conscience, our good-personhood, and our highest rational convictions, and lodge themselves between us and the world, between our imperfect humanity and our aspirational selves, between who we believe we are and how we behave. In the introduction, Vedantam contextualizes why this phenomenon isn’t new but bears greater urgency than ever: Unconscious biases have always dogged us, but multiple factors made them especially dangerous today. Globalization and technology, and the intersecting faultlines of religious extremism, economic upheaval, demographic change, and mass migration have amplified the effects of hidden biases. Illustration from the 1970 book 'I’m Glad I’m a Boy! Vedantam writes: Donating = Loving Share on Tumblr

http://www.brainpickings.org/2014/04/09/the-hidden-brain-shankar-vedantam/

Related:  jeantaiwanFeminismCognitive BiasSocial Responsibility

Classroom observations: what’s the best fix for a good but not perfect measure? Imagine having someone follow you around, observing you for just a fraction of a day, to assess your capability on the job. Sounds nerve wracking. This is how many teachers are evaluated, and new research suggests that these observations are not altogether reliable. Although observations as a means of teacher assessment may be favoured over other methods such as gains in pupil standardised test score, we should be wary of relying too heavily on observations as they currently stand. A new paper out by the Brookings Institute reports that an assessment of teachers via observations is biased based on the existing ability level of the pupils in the class.

Dads on Sitcoms - Alexis C. Madrigal On television shows, dads have been portrayed as incompetent dolts reflecting and encouraging a damaging attitude towards men and childcare. My son. (Alexis Madrigal/The Atlantic) ASPEN — As a new dad, I've often been struck with horror at dads I see on TV. On the small screen, dads are dolts, dads are idiots. The Barrister Magazine - Unconscious Bias at Play behind Closed Doors By Snéha Khilay, Professional Development Consultant Blue Tulip Training “If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor. If an elephant has its foot on the tail of a mouse, and you say that you are neutral, the mouse will not appreciate your neutrality.” Desmond Tutu

Creating Classrooms for Social Justice A lot has been discussed and written about being an "educator for social justice." What does that really mean? In this post, I will break down a few basic classroom practices that allow teachers to engage with best practices in teaching core subjects while also being advocates for social justice in the classroom. Want to Stop Mean Girls? Raise Nice Girls, Instead  Once upon a time, fourth grade was the year that young girls began to have difficulty navigating friendships. For many years, I worked in a school for kids with learning disabilities. It was always during fourth grade that previously established friendships began to hit turbulence. Male and Female Brains Really Are Built Differently - Olga Khazan Ready your knowing smirk, because here comes a scientific gem that’s sure to enliven even the dullest of holiday parties. By analyzing the MRIs of 949 people aged 8 to 22, scientists at the University of Pennsylvania found that male brains have more connections within each hemisphere, while female brains are more interconnected between hemispheres. Yes, take that, Mike from IT! It, like, so explains why you just dropped the eggnog while attempting to make flirty conversation with Janet from Accounting.

Things You Cannot Unsee (And What That Says About Your Brain) We're going to rewire your brain. Are you ready? I want to show you something simple your mind can do, which illustrates a fascinating emerging theory about how the brain works. First, look at this logo of the World Cup this year. The idea of the emblem is obvious: This is an illustration of a trophy with an abstract soccer ball on top. Social Justice: A Whole-School Approach Social justice -- what does that mean to you as a person? As an educator? If you're interested in starting this conversation, here's a place to start.

Giving Good Praise to Girls: What Messages Stick How to praise kids: It’s a hot topic for many parents and educators. A lot of the conversation around it has stemmed from studies by Carol Dweck, professor of psychology at Stanford who has been researching this specific topic for many years. “My research shows that praise for intelligence or ability backfires,” said Dweck, who co-authored a seminal research paper on the effects of praise on motivation and performance. “What we’ve shown is that when you praise someone, say, ‘You’re smart at this,’ the next time they struggle, they think they’re not.

Related: