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Elements of Suspense in Writing: 6 Secret to Creating and Sustaining Suspense

Elements of Suspense in Writing: 6 Secret to Creating and Sustaining Suspense
Thriller writing? Mystery writing? Literary fiction? It’s all the same: Building apprehension in the minds of your readers is one of the most effective keys to engaging them early in your novel and keeping them flipping pages late into the night. Simply put, if you don’t hook your readers, they won’t get into the story. If you don’t drive the story forward by making readers worry about your main character, they won’t have a reason to keep reading. Think: Worry equals suspense. The best part is, the secrets for ratcheting up the suspense are easy to implement. 1. Four factors are necessary for suspense—reader empathy, reader concern, impending danger and escalating tension. We create reader empathy by giving the character a desire, wound or internal struggle that readers can identify with. We want readers to worry about whether or not the character will get what he wants. Suspense builds as danger approaches. Then blow in more. And more. Until the reader can hardly stand it. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/6-secrets-to-creating-and-sustaining-suspense

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Literary Elements: Plot and Conflict Throughout the course of the school year, we will be studying various elements of literature in preparation for the PSSAs. As we read short stories, poetry and drama, we will look at the appropriate literary elements in detail so we can better understand the literature. The following literary elements will be discussed as we study short stories: Plot: The chain of related events that explains to us what happens in a story Conflict aka "the Hook": A struggle between two opposing characters or forces Character: A person, animal, or imaginary creature in a story, play, or another literary work Setting: The time and place of a story Theme: The general idea or message about life that is revealed through a work of literature Plot and the Plot Diagram Plot is the series of events in a story that explain to the reader what is happening. One of the easiest ways to understand plot is to look at the mountain shaped plot diagram and think of story in terms of climbing a mountain.

The Thirty-Six Dramatic Situations The Thirty-Six Dramatic Situations is a descriptive list which was created by Georges Polti to categorize every dramatic situation that might occur in a story or performance. To do this Polti analyzed classical Greek texts, plus classical and contemporaneous French works. He also analyzed a handful of non-French authors. In his introduction, Polti claims to be continuing the work of Carlo Gozzi, who also identified 36 situations. Publication history[edit] “Gozzi maintained that there can be but thirty-six tragic situations. The Art of Conflict by Rachael Thomas Happy Monday! Rachael Thomas explains why conflict plays a crucial role in a story. Every story needs conflict, but what exactly is conflict and why does it matter in romance? Conflict is an incompatibility between the objectives of your characters and is needed because it creates tension in your story. In short, it’s what keeps your characters apart emotionally despite the physical attraction they have for each other. A character with a believable conflict will keep the reader turning those pages to see what happens next.

How To Create An Intriguing Inciting Incident Every single element between the first page and the very last page of a screenplay is arguably the most important, salable thing about it. In this article, the beginning of the plot takes the number one spot. However, the plot really can’t begin being awesome until it is set in motion. That’s where the inciting event comes in. A good plot is everything that transpires in the screenplay and, if it’s captivating, will have an equally captivating inciting event. But good inciting events don’t come easy.

How to Break Up Your Novel into Definable Sections Last week I started diving into the three-act structure and explained that such structure is random and arbitrary. While many writing instructors swear by this structure, I feel it’s too pat and restrictive to be a “one size fits all,” and, really, it’s the story that should determine how many acts it needs. And even with that, it’s up to the writer to decide if he wants to break his story up into acts or sections. Plot vs. Exposition Plot vs. Exposition by Melanie Anne Phillipscreator StoryWeaver, co-creator Dramatica A common misconception is that Plot is the order of events in a story. In fact, the order in which events are unfolded for the reader or audience can be quite different from the order in which they happen to the characters.

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