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RepRap Project

RepRap Project
RepRap version 1.0 (Darwin) RepRap version 2.0 (Mendel) First part ever made by a Reprap to make a Reprap, fabricated by the Zaphod prototype, by Vik Olliver (2006/09/13) The RepRap project is a British initiative to develop a 3D printer that can print most of its own components.[1] RepRap (short for replicating rapid prototyper) uses an additive manufacturing technique called Fused filament fabrication (FFF) to lay down material in layers; a plastic filament or metal wire is unwound from a coil and supplies material to produce a part. The project calls it Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF) to avoid trademark issues around the "fused deposition modeling" term. As an open design, all of the designs produced by the project are released under a free software license, the GNU General Public License.[2] History[edit] All of the plastic parts for the machine on the right were produced by the machine on the left. Video of RepRap printing an object RepRap 0.1 building an object 23 March 2005 Summer 2005

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RepRap_Project

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Open design RepRap general-purpose 3D printer that not only could be used to make structures and functional components for open-design projects but is an open-source project itself. Uzebox is an open-design video game console.[1] Zoybar open source guitar kit With 3-D printed body[4] Open design is the development of physical products, machines and systems through use of publicly shared design information. Open design involves the making of both free and open-source software (FOSS) as well as open-source hardware.

Energy Catalyzer The device was demonstrated to invited audiences several times in 2011, and commented on by various academics and others, but no independent tests have been made, and no peer-reviewed tests have been published. Steve Featherstone wrote in Popular Science that by the summer of 2012 Rossi's "outlandish claims" for the E-Cat seemed "thoroughly debunked" and that Rossi "looked like a con man clinging to his story to the bitter end."[12] SOAP Characteristics[edit] SOAP can form the foundation layer of a web services protocol stack, providing a basic messaging framework upon which web services can be built. This XML-based protocol consists of three parts: an envelope, which defines what is in the message and how to process it, a set of encoding rules for expressing instances of application-defined datatypes, and a convention for representing procedure calls and responses. SOAP has three major characteristics: extensibility (security and WS-routing are among the extensions under development), neutrality (SOAP can be used over any transport protocol such as HTTP, SMTP, TCP, UDP, or JMS), and independence (SOAP allows for any programming model).

MakerBot Industries MakerBot Industries is a Brooklyn, New York-based company founded in January 2009 by Bre Pettis, Adam Mayer and Zach "Hoeken" Smith producing 3D printers. MakerBot builds on the early progress of the RepRap Project. History[edit] Smith was one of the founding members of the RepRap Research Foundation,[1] a non-profit group created to help advance early research in the area of open-source 3D printers.[2] The company started shipping kits in April 2009 and had sold approximately 3,500 units as of March 2011. Demand for the kits was so great in 2009 that the company solicited MakerBot owners to provide parts for future devices from their own MakerBots.[3] Seed funding of $75,000 was provided by Jake Lodwick ($50,000) and Adrian Bowyer and his wife Christine ($25,000).[4]

Fab lab A fab lab (fabrication laboratory) is a small-scale workshop offering (personal) digital fabrication.[1][2] A fab lab is generally equipped with an array of flexible computer controlled tools that cover several different length scales and various materials, with the aim to make "almost anything".[3] This includes technology-enabled products generally perceived as limited to mass production. While fab labs have yet to compete with mass production and its associated economies of scale in fabricating widely distributed products, they have already shown the potential to empower individuals to create smart devices for themselves. These devices can be tailored to local or personal needs in ways that are not practical or economical using mass production. Gallium nitride Its sensitivity to ionizing radiation is low (like other group III nitrides), making it a suitable material for solar cell arrays for satellites. Military and space applications could also benefit as devices have shown stability in radiation environments.[6] Because GaN transistors can operate at much higher temperatures and work at much higher voltages than gallium arsenide (GaAs) transistors, they make ideal power amplifiers at microwave frequencies. Physical properties[edit] Developments[edit] GaN with a high crystalline quality can be obtained by depositing a buffer layer at low temperatures.[12] Such high-quality GaN led to the discovery of p-type GaN,[9] p-n junction blue/UV-LEDs[9] and room-temperature stimulated emission[13] (indispensable for laser action).[14] This has led to the commercialization of high-performance blue LEDs and long-lifetime violet-laser diodes, and to the development of nitride-based devices such as UV detectors and high-speed field-effect transistors.

Representational state transfer Representational State Transfer (REST) is a software architecture style consisting of guidelines and best practices for creating scalable web services.[1][2] REST is a coordinated set of constraints applied to the design of components in a distributed hypermedia system that can lead to a more performant and maintainable architecture.[3] REST has gained widespread acceptance across the Web[citation needed] as a simpler alternative to SOAP and WSDL-based Web services. RESTful systems typically, but not always, communicate over the Hypertext Transfer Protocol with the same HTTP verbs (GET, POST, PUT, DELETE, etc.) used by web browsers to retrieve web pages and send data to remote servers.[3] The REST architectural style was developed by W3C Technical Architecture Group (TAG) in parallel with HTTP 1.1, based on the existing design of HTTP 1.0.[4] The World Wide Web represents the largest implementation of a system conforming to the REST architectural style. Architectural properties[edit]

CHANCE FOR A BETTER LIFE: New Zealand in demand of 50,000 workers In New Zealand, which is in full economic upswing and whose people show affection towards immigration to get to know new places, is in need of foreign workers. One of the participants in the upcoming Fair Employment in Sydney is New Zealand, it will present 1,200 vacancies, Belgian media reported. This country, with one of the highest living standards in the world, will need in the next two years at least 50,000 foreign workers. IT specialists, construction workers, engineers, and health workers are most scarce. The biggest advantage of this distant country is its quality of life.

Open-source hardware Open source hardware consists of physical artifacts of technology designed and offered by the open design movement. Both free and open source software (FOSS) as well as open source hardware is created by this open source culture movement and applies a like concept to a variety of components. The term usually means that information about the hardware is easily discerned. Hardware design (i.e. mechanical drawings, schematics, bills of material, PCB layout data, HDL source code and integrated circuit layout data), in addition to the software that drives the hardware, are all released with the FOSS approach.

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