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SDO Data - Solar Dynamics Observatory

SDO Data - Solar Dynamics Observatory
SDO | Data 4096 2048 1024 512 4096 PFSS 2048 PFSS 1024 PFSS 512 PFSS 48 hr MP4 4096 2048 1024 512 4096 PFSS 2048 PFSS 1024 PFSS 512 PFSS 48 hr MP4 4096 2048 1024 512 4096 PFSS 2048 PFSS 1024 PFSS 512 PFSS 48 hr MP4 4096 2048 1024 512 4096 PFSS 2048 PFSS 1024 PFSS 512 PFSS 48 hr MP4 4096 2048 1024 512 4096 PFSS 2048 PFSS 1024 PFSS 512 PFSS 48 hr MP4 4096 2048 1024 512 4096 PFSS 2048 PFSS 1024 PFSS 512 PFSS 48 hr MP4 4096 2048 1024 512 4096 PFSS 2048 PFSS 1024 PFSS 512 PFSS 48 hr MP4 4096 2048 1024 512 4096 PFSS 2048 PFSS 1024 PFSS 512 PFSS 48 hr MP4 4096 2048 1024 512 4096 PFSS 2048 PFSS 1024 PFSS 512 PFSS 48 hr MP4 HMI Magnetogram 4096 2048 1024 512 4096 PFSS 2048 PFSS 1024 PFSS 512 PFSS 48 hr MPEG HMI Colorized Magnetogram 4096 2048 1024 512 48 hr MPEG HMI Intensitygram - colored 4096 2048 1024 512 48 hr MPEG HMI Intensitygram - Flattened 4096 2048 1024 512 48 hr MPEG HMI Intensitygram 4096 2048 1024 512 48 hr MPEG HMI Dopplergram Soft X-ray Latest SAM Rotation movie EVE Diodes 3-day plot Related:  Soleil / Sun

A quoi ressemble le Soleil vu depuis Pluton En se basant sur des données recueillies par l’ESO (European Southern Observatory), les scientifiques ont réussi à donner une idée (et même une image) de ce à quoi ressemble une belle matinée ensoleillée sur Pluton. Pluton est situé 40 fois plus loin du Soleil que la Terre. Du coup, depuis cette planète naine qui ne représente qu’un cinquième de la Terre, la lumière solaire paraît 1.000 fois plus faible. De plus, cette planète naine est couverte de plaques de méthane gelé et d’une atmosphère brumeuse dans laquelle flotte le méthane gazeux. Soit des conditions qui diffèrent largement de celles que l'on peut connaitre sur Terre. Avez-vous déjà partagé cet article? Partager sur Facebook Partager sur Twitter Mais en tenant compte de ces différentes données, un ordinateur a généré une image donnant une petite idée de ce à quoi ressemble la surface ensoleillée de Pluton, composée essentiellement de pierres et de glace.

The Greatest Mysteries of Mars| Is there life on Mars? | Biggest Questions of the Universe | Space.com This is a portion of the first 360-degree view of the martian surface taken by Spirit's panoramic camera. Part of the spacecraft can be seen in the lower part of the image. PhotoCredit: NASA/JPL/Cornell Each Friday this summer, Life's Little Mysteries presents The Greatest Mysteries of the Cosmos, starting with our solar system. Mars, the fourth planet from the Sun, gets its name from the Roman god of war on account of its blood-rust color. Despite these setbacks, our curiosity regarding Mars has never abated. Abode of life? You can't talk about Mars without raising the question of life. "What everyone wants to know is: has the planet ever harbored life?" Today, and for most of its history, Mars has been a "cold, dry, desolate world," said Squyres. To make life, you (most likely) need water. Warm and wet to cold and dry The next biggest mystery concerning Mars is, "What happened?" A tale of two hemispheres Bonus boggler: Funky, lumpy moons

Le Soleil - SpaceWeather live Real-time plots auroral activity Welcome on SpaceWeatherLive! Below you will find the status of the solar wind and the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) from the past two hours as measured by the ACE spacecraft. Observed Kp: 2o Predicted Kp: 2- (+78m Kp: 2+) Kiruna Magnetogram This magnetogram gives you the values measured by the ground station of Kiruna (Sweden, Europa). EPAM - Electron Proton and Alpha Monitor EPAM stands for the electron, proton and alpha monitoring and is an instrument on the ACE satellite that measures the electrons and protons that are sent with the solar wind. Real-time solar activity Sunspot regions Sunspot number: 46 - New regions: 0 H-alpha plages without spots Solar flare 10% chance for an M-class solar flare1% chance for an X-class solar flare Highest value (2h max) Events on the sun today Below you'll find an overview of the solar flares that occurred today on the Sun, ordered by the time of the event. More events in the archive Farside

Titan « Lights in the Dark Illustration of a sunrise above a liquid methane lake on Titan. © Ron Miller. All rights reserved. We’ve known for quite some time now that lakes of liquid methane and ethane exist on the frigid surface of Saturn’s overcast moon Titan. While the sheer presence of large amounts of liquid on another world is fascinating, one thing that’s particularly intrigued scientists about these hydrocarbon lakes is their uncanny stillness — in many radar images they appear to be literally as smooth as glass, with no indication of movement or wave action of any sort. And although liquid methane isn’t water and probably behaves differently, with Titan’s substantial atmosphere it only makes sense that some sort of waves would get kicked up across lakes so vast, even from the most moderate seasonal breezes. Read the rest of this article here. Like this post? Like this: Like Loading...

Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2016 April 15 Mercury and Crescent Moon Set Image Credit & Copyright: Miguel Claro (TWAN, Dark Sky Alqueva) Explanation: Innermost planet Mercury and a thin crescent Moon are never found far from the Sun in planet Earth's skies. Tomorrow's picture: Heliopause Electrostatic Rapid Transit System Authors & editors: Robert Nemiroff (MTU) & Jerry Bonnell (UMCP)NASA Official: Phillip Newman Specific rights apply.NASA Web Privacy Policy and Important NoticesA service of:ASD at NASA / GSFC& Michigan Tech.

Astronomy Picture of the Day Helioviewer.org - Solar and heliospheric image visualization tool Greetings Sun Unleashes X6.9 Class Flare Sun Unleashes X6.9 Class Flare On August 9, 2011 at 3:48 a.m. EDT, the sun emitted an Earth-directed X6.9 flare, as measured by the NOAA GOES satellite. These gigantic bursts of radiation cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to harm humans on the ground, however they can disrupt the atmosphere and disrupt GPS and communications signals. In this case, it appears the flare is strong enough to potentially cause some radio communication blackouts. It also produced increased solar energetic proton radiation -- enough to affect humans in space if they do not protect themselves. There was also a coronal mass ejection (CME) associated with this flare. Updates will be forthcoming if needed. Related Links: › Solar Flares: What does it take to be X-class?› Karen C.

Solar images at SDAC Click on any of the following thumbnail images for the most recent, full-resolution solar image of each type in the SDAC archive. The time and date of each image is below the image description. All times are in coordinated Universal Time (UTC). Images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) A Note on Color Tables The color tables used to display AIA images here are the ones used to display similar bandpasses for SOHO EIT and STEREO EUVI images. Color tables for the 94, 131, and 335 Å bandpasses are still under development. Images from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Images from other sources Return to the home page for the SDAC.

SOLARCYCLE 24.com / SolarHam.com / Solar Cycle 24 / Spaceweather / Amateur Radio VHF Aurora Website

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