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How to Hone Your Creative Routine and Master the Pace of Productivity

How to Hone Your Creative Routine and Master the Pace of Productivity
by Maria Popova “When you work regularly, inspiration strikes regularly.” We seem to have a strange but all too human cultural fixation on the daily routines and daily rituals of famous creators, from Vonnegut to Burroughs to Darwin — as if a glimpse of their day-to-day would somehow magically infuse ours with equal potency, or replicating it would allow us to replicate their genius in turn. And though much of this is mere cultural voyeurism, there is something to be said for the value of a well-engineered daily routine to anchor the creative process. Manage Your Day-to-Day: Build Your Routine, Find Your Focus, and Sharpen Your Creative Mind (public library), edited by Behance’s 99U editor-in-chief Jocelyn Glei and featuring contributions from a twenty of today’s most celebrated thinkers and doers, delves into the secrets of this holy grail of creativity. It’s time to stop blaming our surroundings and start taking responsibility. Step by step, you make your way forward. Donating = Loving

http://www.brainpickings.org/2013/05/22/manage-your-day-to-day-99u/

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How Keeping Things Simple Makes You A Productive Entrepreneur Running your own business is a complicated affair; making it successful can be even more complicated. If you don’t have a plan to be productive and keep focused, the details that you are responsible for can quickly overwhelm you. In fact, one of the biggest failings of new entrepreneurs is to get so caught up in an avalanche of unimportant details that more important priorities get left unattended on the table. What can you do to be a productive entrepreneur, focused on what really matters?

The Daily Routines of Geniuses - HBR Juan Ponce de León spent his life searching for the fountain of youth. I have spent mine searching for the ideal daily routine. But as years of color-coded paper calendars have given way to cloud-based scheduling apps, routine has continued to elude me; each day is a new day, as unpredictable as a ride on a rodeo bull and over seemingly as quickly. Naturally, I was fascinated by the recent book, Daily Rituals: How Artists Work. Author Mason Curry examines the schedules of 161 painters, writers, and composers, as well as philosophers, scientists, and other exceptional thinkers. As I read, I became convinced that for these geniuses, a routine was more than a luxury — it was essential to their work. FUCKING HOMEPAGE - Useful Websites Here is a list of websites we have featured in the past that might come in handy. Remember to set FuckingHomepage.com as your start page if you haven’t already. Educational/Learning favoriteandforget.com – Useful and educational links updated daily. Set it as your homepage and forget about it.khanacademy.org - video lectures on just about any subjectted.com - lectures by smart peopleinternetisuseful.com - for every educational website or useful web app out thereacademicearth.org - classroom lecturesfreerice.com - expand your vocabulary while feeding the hungrylizardpoint.com - a collection of geography quizzesmathrun.net - timed math quizzesclassicshorts.com - the best short storieserowid.org - learn about drugsqwikia.com - turn a Wikipedia article into a videounplugthetv.com - a collection of intellectually stimulating videosfactsie.com - a place to learn amazing and unusual historical and scientific facts Learn Skills

Design researchers must think fast and slow Generally, we think of research as the focused, systematic collection of data, over time, in keeping with a given framework or theory. In this view, research is intended to confirm or deny given hypotheses, and incrementally improve our knowledge about a given topic. We know from the book Thinking Fast and Slow, however, that this research approach only serves one type of thinking. Thinking Fast and Slow author Daniel Kahneman tells us that “Type 2” or “slow thinking” is a disciplined, focused, kind of thought that roughly matches the deductive reasoning of the scientific method and other traditional forms of research. It is structured and deliberate, requiring the cerebral cortex. But Type 1 or “fast thinking” is less structured, more instinctual, and involves the more reptilian parts of the brain.

Life is routine and routine is resistance to wonder. If you’ve followed my writing or heard me speak you may have heard me quote Philosopher and Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel saying, “Life is routine and routine is resistance to wonder.” Our brains are wired toward routine and we absolutely lose our sense of wonder in every day life. Yet wonder is a natural anti-depressant. Benefits of Simplicity to Productivity Simplicity is often perceived as boring, unattractive and unremarkable. Majority of people want something striking and complicated. But as Leonardo da Vinci has said, Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. Read This Google Email About Time Management Strategy Editor’s Note: This article is one of the top 10 Leadership stories of 2015. See the full list here. I recently wrote an email to our team that posed a simple challenge in time management. The response I got was unexpected, and I was urged to share it with more people—so here we are. Some of my fellow Googlers went so far as to make a video for those of us who appreciate a good visual aid.

Children are suffering a severe deficit of play – Peter Gray When I was a child in the 1950s, my friends and I had two educations. We had school (which was not the big deal it is today), and we also had what I call a hunter-gather education. We played in mixed-age neighbourhood groups almost every day after school, often until dark. We played all weekend and all summer long. We had time to explore in all sorts of ways, and also time to become bored and figure out how to overcome boredom, time to get into trouble and find our way out of it, time to daydream, time to immerse ourselves in hobbies, and time to read comics and whatever else we wanted to read rather than the books assigned to us.

Strict Mode Starting with ECMAScript 5, developers are able to place their code into a more constrained form of execution known as strict mode. Strict mode improves JavaScript code by enforcing better programming practices and eliminating some of the language’s insecure and ill-advised features. Strict mode is enabled by adding the following directive to your code: The Difference Between Routine and Ritual: How to Master the Balancing Act of Controlling Chaos and Finding Magic in the Mundane by Maria Popova “The wonder of life is often most easily recognizable through habits and routines.” William James, at the dawn of modern psychology, argued that our habits anchor us to ourselves. As someone equally fascinated by the daily routines of artists and with their curious creative rituals, and as a practitioner of both in my own life, I frequently contemplate the difference between the routine and ritual, these two supreme deities of habit.

The Morning Routine Experts Recommend for Peak Productivity What’s the best way to start your day so that you really get things done? Laura Vanderkam studied the schedules of high-achievers. What did she find? Happiness Makes Your Brain Work Better Entrepreneurs, in general, are strivers. We set targets, battle to meet them, and believe that getting to that point, whatever it is, will bring us increased satisfaction. But according to one positive psychology researcher out of Harvard, as commonsensical as this tendency to chase achievement in order to attain greater happiness may sound, it's actually got the equation reversed. In a fascinating (and funny) TEDxBloomington talk, Shawn Achor, author of The Happiness Advantage, argues that while we may think success will bring us happiness, the lab-validated truth is that happiness brings us more success. And understanding this is particularly valuable for entrepreneurs, Achor said in an interview.

Science 2.0 Science 2.0 is a somewhat controversial umbrella term, not precisely defined,[1] which describes a range of activities,[2] described by proponents of the term as coalescing[3] into an emerging open science movement.[3][4] The term suggests the benefit of increased collaboration between scientists,[2][3][5] often digitally based, using computer networking and the Internet.[6] Science 2.0 encompasses scientists using collaborative technology like wikis,[4] blogs,[4][5] and video journals,[2] to share findings,[4] which may include raw data and "nascent theories" online.[7] The sense of the term suggests the benefits of openness and sharing, regarding papers and research ideas and partial solutions.[3] A general view is that Science 2.0 is gaining traction[3] with websites beginning to proliferate,[7] yet at the same time there is considerable resistance within the scientific community about aspects of the transition as well as discussion about what, exactly, the term means. See also[edit]

How the Brain Learns—A Super Simple Explanation for eLearning Professionals How the Brain Learns—A Super Simple Explanation for eLearning Professionals In his book, The Art of Changing the Brain, Dr. James Zull , notably suggested how David Kolb's famous four-phase model of the learning cycle can be mapped into four major brain processes. He believed that better understanding the learning processes that occurs in the brain encourages a more flexible approach to learning. It does, by extension, help us become better eLearning developers and learners.

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