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Step-by-Step Directions for Creating Passion Projects in Our Classroom

Step-by-Step Directions for Creating Passion Projects in Our Classroom

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The Genius Hour: How 60 minutes a week can electrify your job Lots of people believe that a single individual can’t make a difference in an organization. Lots of people, it turns out, are wrong. Take the case of Jen Shefner. She’s an assistant vice president at Columbia Credit Union in Vancouver, WA, in charge of the credit union’s online and mobile services. These 20 Photographs Will Leave You Speechless. Especially The 11th One. There Are No Words. Take a look at these 20 powerful photos that will leave you speechless. Some of these photos are of truly historic moments, while others, are quite heartbreaking. World War II veteran from Belarus Konstantin Pronin, 86, sits on a bench as he waits for his comrades at Gorky park during Victory Day in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, May 9, 2011. Konstantin comes to this place every year.

The Genius Hour Design Cycle: A Process For Planning - 3. Some students need a push in the right direction Some students will come up with projects that are too simple with answers that could be easily Googled. We introduced the students to ‘High Order Thinking Skills’ and built these into the planning forms students complete. Genius Hour Manifesto Denise Krebs, Gallit Zvi, Hugh McDonald and Joy Kirr came together to discuss “Genius Hour”. Each of these teachers has been running Genius Hour in his/her classroom and writing about their experiences online. This is the “Genius Hour Manifesto”: A guide to anyone who wants to know WHAT Genius Hour is, WHERE the idea came from, HOW to facilitate it in the classroom, WHY it is a next-practice in education, and HOW to get involved. Enjoy! What is Genius Hour?

20 percent projects: 10 must-have tools Students engaging in 20 percent projects must gather and curate information, share it and present it. Here are 10 tools to help. Every good handyman (or handywoman) knows that having the right tool can save minutes — or hours — of work. Academic work is no exception. Students who engage in 20 percent projects — where 20 percent of class time is devoted to a project the student is passionate about — engage in certain activities to prepare for the culminating event: often a presentation in front of their peers. There’s content gathering and content curation to be done. The Durango Herald 06/23/2015 With construction more than 50 percent complete, the dream of a new $7 million outdoor learning center in Monticello, Utah, is quickly becoming reality. Enlarge photo Courtesy of MHTN Architects An exterior rendering of the Canyon Country Discovery Center in Monticello, Utah. Courtesy of Four Corners School of Outdoor Education Scott Shishim, a bioregional outdoor education project educator from Colorado, attends a conference in Utah where he will build educational curriculum centered around the Colorado Plateau to bring back to his students.

Upgrade your KWL Chart to the 21st Century One of the take aways from the Curriculum Mapping Institute this past week was that it brought an upgrade to THE trusted KWL (Know, What to Know and Learned) Chart to the forefront. It seems a no brainer…one of those things… “I should have thought about it”… So what is this upgrade all about? An “H” snuck into the Acronym! What’s New in Evernote Web Clipper Capture articles to read later The Evernote Web Clipper will automatically detect the article on a page and create a beautiful rendering of it inside your Evernote account. You can expand or shrink the selection using the grab bars. Clip simplified articles Enjoy a better reading experience on your favorite blogs and news sources. Steps to Help Low-Income Students Direct Their Own Learning When Susan Wolfe, an elementary school teacher in Boise, Idaho, asks her class the qualities of a good student, kids often list things like: taking responsibility for themselves, doing homework, being good communicators. By focusing on the what the students believe — instead of what she could dictate to them — Wolfe applies techniques of student-centered learning, which she has embraced throughout her 18-year teaching career working almost exclusively in Title I schools. “The kids need to believe that they’re not here to have learning crammed down their throats,” she said. She says it is fundamental for teachers to take the time to build a class culture for which students take ownership. And contrary to many stereotypes about disadvantaged kids, in her experience, every child, no matter their background, wants that learning autonomy.

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