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How consciousness works – Michael Graziano

How consciousness works – Michael Graziano
Scientific talks can get a little dry, so I try to mix it up. I take out my giant hairy orangutan puppet, do some ventriloquism and quickly become entangled in an argument. I’ll be explaining my theory about how the brain — a biological machine — generates consciousness. Kevin, the orangutan, starts heckling me. ‘Yeah, well, I don’t have a brain. But I’m still conscious. Kevin is the perfect introduction. Many thinkers have approached consciousness from a first-person vantage point, the kind of philosophical perspective according to which other people’s minds seem essentially unknowable. Lately, the problem of consciousness has begun to catch on in neuroscience. I believe that the easy and the hard problems have gotten switched around. In a period of rapid evolutionary expansion called the Cambrian Explosion, animal nervous systems acquired the ability to boost the most urgent incoming signals. Attention requires control. I call this the ‘attention schema theory’. And then what?

http://aeon.co/magazine/philosophy/how-consciousness-works/

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These 8 Psychological Facts Will Help You Understand A Lot More About Life. #5 Is A Game Changer. Psychology is a powerful thing. It’s responsible for so much of what we do in life whether we’re conscious of it or not. Luckily, we’re here to help enlighten you about your own brain. Here are eight powerful psychological facts that will help you understand a lot more about life. 1). Humans, Version 3.0 Credit: Flickr user Suvcon Where are we humans going, as a species? If science fiction is any guide, we will genetically evolve like in X-Men, become genetically engineered as in Gattaca, or become cybernetically enhanced like General Grievous in Star Wars. All of these may well be part of the story of our future, but I’m not holding my breath.

Manipulating Memory For psychologist Alain Brunet, the case is still astonishing. When Patrick Moreau first came into his office suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the Canadian soldier, who had served as a United Nations peacekeeper in Bosnia, could hardly bear to recount the details of the day he was taken hostage in 1993. The memory–of kneeling on the ground with his hands on his head, legs shaking, a stark line of trees across the sky–aroused crippling fear that felt as fresh as it had 15 years before. The glimpse of a particular tree line through his windshield was enough to bring the memory rushing back, giving him such violent shakes that he would have to pull off the road. But six months after participating in Brunet’s clinical trial, Moreau no longer meets the diagnostic criteria for PTSD. He still experiences some flashbacks, but they are less frequent and less intense.

Neural networks and deep learning One of the most striking facts about neural networks is that they can compute any function at all. That is, suppose someone hands you some complicated, wiggly function, f(x): No matter what the function, there is guaranteed to be a neural network so that for every possible input, x, the value f(x) (or some close approximation) is output from the network, e.g.: This result holds even if the function has many inputs, f=f(x1,…,xm), and many outputs. Interesting Psychology Articles Interesting Psychology Articles After a studying all degrees and phds in psychology, i found these are the most interesting articles in the field of psychology. These are the only articles which attracts the young people more and many of the people thought these are for flirting but we providing these articles only to understand the others and strengthen your relationships. People remember one thing Psychtronics.com makes the Psychology more interesting. You find the more interesting psychology aritcles here (Interesting psychology topics for paper presentation)

Confessions of a Biological Scientist – Part I: The Limits of Meat Science has proceeded uninterrupted for hundreds of years now, through its progress we have emerged from ignorance and awakened to the reality of our Universe. But scientific advancement is now retarded by a fundamental problem, the scientists. In the near future something as important as science will no longer be left to imperfect and inefficient biological scientists, but will become be the realm of digital scientists. Gut feelings: the future of psychiatry may be inside your stomach Her parents were running out of hope. Their teenage daughter, Mary, had been diagnosed with a severe case of obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD), as well as ADHD. They had dragged her to clinics around the country in an effort to thwart the scary, intrusive thoughts and the repetitive behaviors that Mary felt compelled to perform. Even a litany of psychotropic medications didn’t make much difference. It seemed like nothing could stop the relentless nature of Mary’s disorder.

SHRDLU resurrection This page was created in 2002 and last updated 2013 August 22 Broken links are marked with [brackets]. SHRDLU was a 1970 artificial intelligence (AI) tour de force, written in MACLISP for the Incompatible Time Sharing System (ITS). To quote SHRDLU's creator: The system answers questions, executes commands, and accepts information in an interactive English dialog... The system contains a parser, a recognition grammar of English, programs for semantic analysis, and a general problem solving system... It can remember and discuss its plans and actions as well as carrying them out... Knowledge in the system is represented in the form of procedures, rather than tables of rules or lists of patterns.

The Battle for Your Mind: Brainwashing Techniques Authoritarian followers Mind Control Subliminals By Dick Sutphen Summary of Contents The Birth of Conversion The Three Brain Phases How Revivalist Preachers Work Voice Roll Technique Six Conversion Techniques 1. keeping agreements 2.physical and mental fatigue 3. increase the tension 4. How Much Longer Before Our First AI Catastrophe? As I distinctly recall, some speculated that the Stock Market crash of 1987, was due to high frequency trading by computers, and mindful of this possibility, I think regulators passed laws to prevent computers from trading in that specific pattern again. I remember something vague about about "throttles" being installed in the trading software that kick in whenever they see a sudden, global spike in the area in which they are trading. These throttles where supposed to slow down trading to a point where human operators could see what was happening and judge whether there was an unintentional feedback loop happening. This was 1987.

Neuroscientist Daniela Schiller is Researching Ways that Bad Memories Can be Made Less Fearsome It was a Saturday night at the New York Psychoanalytic Institute, and the second-floor auditorium held an odd mix of gray-haired, cerebral Upper East Side types and young, scruffy downtown grad students in black denim. Up on the stage, neuroscientist Daniela Schiller, a riveting figure with her long, straight hair and impossibly erect posture, paused briefly from what she was doing to deliver a mini-lecture about memory. She explained how recent research, including her own, has shown that memories are not unchanging physical traces in the brain. Instead, they are malleable constructs that may be rebuilt every time they are recalled. The research suggests, she said, that doctors (and psychotherapists) might be able to use this knowledge to help patients block the fearful emotions they experience when recalling a traumatic event, converting chronic sources of debilitating anxiety into benign trips down memory lane. Fear training

Network of 75 Million Neurons of the Mouse Brain Mapped for the First Time Network of 75 Million Neurons of the Mouse Brain Mapped for the First Time With improved visualization tools and souped-up computers to crunch the massive numbers involved in studying the 100 billion neurons in the human brain, many researchers, including the U.S. government, are trying to map the brain’s wiring, or “connectome.” Some researchers have dived right in to studying the massive human brain, but others see the mouse brain, with just 75 million neurons, as a more logical place to start. A new atlas of study results related to the mouse connectome offers the equivalent of a highway map, with local roads to be filled in later. The atlas, described in a recent paper in Nature, represents more than four years of work undertaken at the Allen Institute for Brain Science, a private nonprofit funded by a grant by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. It’s the most detailed information we have on the brain of any animal other than that of the roundworm C. elegans, which has just 302 neurons.

5 examples of how the languages we speak can affect the way we think Keith Chen (TED Talk: Could your language affect your ability to save money?) might be an economist, but he wants to talk about language. For instance, he points out, in Chinese, saying “this is my uncle” is not as straightforward as you might think. In Chinese, you have no choice but to encode more information about said uncle. The language requires that you denote the side the uncle is on, whether he’s related by marriage or birth and, if it’s your father’s brother, whether he’s older or younger.

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