background preloader

200 Word Descriptive Hair List

200 Word Descriptive Hair List
Posted by: Kathy Temean | January 28, 2010 Last year I put together a list of descriptive words for food. This year I thought a descriptive list for hair might help you when starting to describe your characters. I included colors, and words of items that adorn the hair. There must be more words, so let’s work together on this. Please leave new words to add in the comment’s section. Agent Scott Treimel says all his manuscripts have a girl with curly hair. Kathy Like this: Like Loading...

http://kathytemean.wordpress.com/2010/01/28/hair-word-list/

Related:  risullyCharacter Developmentamarakhil

Character Flaw Index To make characters realistic and relatable they are given flaws, because if there is anything a writer can be sure of it is that no one in their audience will be perfect. Flaws are character traits that have a negative impact in the narrative, unless they are simply informed. They can also be exploited. See Good Flaws, Bad Flaws for a scale of flaw acceptability. Compare Seven Deadly Sins, Ego Tropes. Abusive Parents: Habitually violent and cruel to their own children, often because that's how they themselves were raised.

50 Portrait Retouching Tutorials To Take Your Photoshop Skills To A New Level Email Is it something that often happens to you? You just sit and keep on looking through your photos on the computer screen trying to take a closer look at your full-size pictures. And then it occurs to you that they didn’t really suck that much during the actual shoot? Of course, what you see during the shoot with your eyes and what you get after the photo session is not the same thing. Heroes and Villains Heroes and villains–they’re of course at opposite end of the spectrum, in terms of characters, but they share more than might be obvious at first glance, and if you’re in the business of writing fiction and creating such characters, it can be useful to think about those things. Of course, the principal element that heroes and villains have in common is their function in terms of the story: it is their interaction which determines the main action of the plot. At its most basic, it is either that the hero is being specifically targeted by the villain, or the villain has general nefarious plots which the hero sets out to foil.

How to Break the Rules of Writing (& More) According to Bestselling YA author Ransom Riggs Like most first conversations and bad first drafts, my (WD’s Managing Editor Adrienne Crezo) interview with Ransom Riggs begins with a discussion about the weather. And not just any weather, either, but peculiar versions of standard precipitation: dust storms, cloudbursts, thundersnow and tornadoes. Of course, Riggs is experiencing none of those phenomena as he sits in the warmth of the never-ending summer of Los Angeles. “I hate to tell you what it’s like here right now,” he says. Warts and All The title of this post comes from a (probably apocryphal) story about Oliver Cromwell asking to have his portrait painted without any of the flattering techniques of portraits of the time–he wanted to be shown as he really looked, ‘warts and all’. I’ve been thinking a lot, lately, about what this phrase means to us as writers–about how we go about constructing characters who seem truly human, not representations of some impossible ideal. Now, we all know that we can’t make our heroes and heroines too perfect. No one wants to read about a character who is unfailingly wise, kind, thoughtful, considerate, and whose hobbies include reading to the blind, feeding the homeless, and caring for small fluffy bunnies. We all want heroes and heroines with real, human flaws.

Al's Writing Block: Writing: How to Describe a Room I've noticed lately in the stats that people have been actively searching for "how to describe a room." Even though I had done a writing prompt that called for using the description of a room, I never did go over the particulars of describing locations. So for anybody looking for some specific answers, here are my thoughts on describing interior settings, for fiction and prose. First and foremost, you got to ask yourself, what importance is the room or setting to the story or characters? If the room is only there for a brief passing scene, it may just suffice to say "so-and-so went into the broom closet.

How to Restore a Character’s Voice When They Develop Laryngitis You’re writing a novel and it’s going well. Your characters are solid, enfleshed, more real to you than yourself on many days. And this is great, because writing is easier when you’re like that celery stalk in third grade – the one stuck in a beaker of blue ink for lessons in osmosis. Story runs through your veins, into all extremities. If sliced open, what seeps from you would contain characters, setting, and theme. Elements of Suspense in Writing: 6 Secret to Creating and Sustaining Suspense Thriller writing? Mystery writing? Literary fiction? It’s all the same: Building apprehension in the minds of your readers is one of the most effective keys to engaging them early in your novel and keeping them flipping pages late into the night.

Take Your Characters to Therapy “Every character should want something–even if it is only a glass of water.” –Kurt Vonnegut Vonnegut was right, of course. But we need to know more than what our characters want.

Related: