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Words to Describe Skin Color

Words to Describe Skin Color

http://www.macmillandictionary.com/thesaurus-category/american/Words-used-to-describe-skin-color

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Character Flaw Index To make characters realistic and relatable they are given flaws, because if there is anything a writer can be sure of it is that no one in their audience will be perfect. Flaws are character traits that have a negative impact in the narrative, unless they are simply informed. They can also be exploited. See Good Flaws, Bad Flaws for a scale of flaw acceptability. Write Better: 3 Ways To Introduce Your Main CharacterWritersDigest.com One of the biggest bugaboos in manuscript submissions is when the author doesn’t properly introduce the protagonist within the first chapter. Readers want to know quickly the protagonist’s sex, age and level of sophistication in the world of the story, and they want to relate to the character on an emotional level. Readers’ interest in the protagonist has to be earned, in other words. If we like a character, then we want to see her do well and we’re willing to follow her around and invest our time and interest in rooting her on in her struggle.

These Maps Show You How to Live, Not Just Where Data for GOOD Knowledge is the first step on the way to progress. It used to be that paper maps were the free gifts that came with your new compass, graphically representing geography via points, lines, and fire-breathing dragons—all of which indicated orientation, distance, latitude, longitude, and the sheer vastness of uncharted territory. But today’s multidimensional digital maps are comprehensive, interactive, and they’ve got the compass built right in. Plus, they’re changing the way we interact with our environments and with each other. Heroes and Villains Heroes and villains–they’re of course at opposite end of the spectrum, in terms of characters, but they share more than might be obvious at first glance, and if you’re in the business of writing fiction and creating such characters, it can be useful to think about those things. Of course, the principal element that heroes and villains have in common is their function in terms of the story: it is their interaction which determines the main action of the plot. At its most basic, it is either that the hero is being specifically targeted by the villain, or the villain has general nefarious plots which the hero sets out to foil. But a common function in the plot isn’t the only thing these two extreme types of characters share. They are leaders, not followers, and they also share high doses of intelligence, imagination and determination, all of which are neutral qualities to be used for either good or bad.

Demons A to Z - Weird Encyclopedia A list of demons, devils, and evil gods from around the world. Probably not exhaustive. If you know of any more, keep it to yourself. Abaddon - King of the Demons of Hell. Creating Bitchy Characters: How to Write a Mean Character If you’re interested in breaking the mold with your character, there is no single criterion for a bitch. However, you might want to consider making several of her dominant traits negative or what society has typically not expected of females. For example, her traits might include being manipulating, selfish, cunning, power-seeking, or vengeful. Or, perhaps your bitch character cannot connect to others emotionally, or she is sexually insatiable. Or maybe she’s simply a nonconformist who is opinionated, mouthy, aggressive, ambitious, or confident. How to Create a Bitchy Character

Warts and All The title of this post comes from a (probably apocryphal) story about Oliver Cromwell asking to have his portrait painted without any of the flattering techniques of portraits of the time–he wanted to be shown as he really looked, ‘warts and all’. I’ve been thinking a lot, lately, about what this phrase means to us as writers–about how we go about constructing characters who seem truly human, not representations of some impossible ideal. Now, we all know that we can’t make our heroes and heroines too perfect.

Dream Dictionary The significance of dreams has probably been debated since people first developed the ability to communicate. Despite this, there's still no agreement on why we dream. It's hard to believe that dreams have no meaning at all, though, especially when it's so much fun to try to figure out what they're trying to tell us. To help you interpret your dreams, we've developed a dictionary you can use to look up some of the images and feelings commonly found in these night time visions.

Creating Stunning Character Arcs, Pt. 2: The Lie Your Character Believes People hate change. We may sit around and wish our lives were different, but when the rubber really starts streaking the tarmac, we usually find ourselves wishing we could just hang out here in our safe and familiar haunts. Characters are no different. They resist change just as staunchly as any of us—which is a good thing. Out of resistance comes conflict; out of conflict comes plot.

How to Restore a Character’s Voice When They Develop Laryngitis You’re writing a novel and it’s going well. Your characters are solid, enfleshed, more real to you than yourself on many days. And this is great, because writing is easier when you’re like that celery stalk in third grade – the one stuck in a beaker of blue ink for lessons in osmosis. 10,000-Year Calendar! Get out the nice paper for these photo calendars! Monthly and yearly calendars available! 100's of artworks and photos available! Print a monthly or a yearly calendar using your own photo for any month or year. How To Create An Intriguing Inciting Incident Every single element between the first page and the very last page of a screenplay is arguably the most important, salable thing about it. In this article, the beginning of the plot takes the number one spot. However, the plot really can’t begin being awesome until it is set in motion. That’s where the inciting event comes in.

Take Your Characters to Therapy “Every character should want something–even if it is only a glass of water.” –Kurt Vonnegut Vonnegut was right, of course. But we need to know more than what our characters want. To truly empathize with our characters, we need to know why they want the things they desire. What makes our characters tick?

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