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Running Hadoop On Ubuntu Linux (Single-Node Cluster) @ Michael G. Noll

Running Hadoop On Ubuntu Linux (Single-Node Cluster) @ Michael G. Noll
In this tutorial I will describe the required steps for setting up a pseudo-distributed, single-node Hadoop cluster backed by the Hadoop Distributed File System, running on Ubuntu Linux. Hadoop is a framework written in Java for running applications on large clusters of commodity hardware and incorporates features similar to those of the Google File System (GFS) and of the MapReduce computing paradigm. Hadoop’s HDFS is a highly fault-tolerant distributed file system and, like Hadoop in general, designed to be deployed on low-cost hardware. It provides high throughput access to application data and is suitable for applications that have large data sets. The main goal of this tutorial is to get a simple Hadoop installation up and running so that you can play around with the software and learn more about it. This tutorial has been tested with the following software versions: Ubuntu Linux 10.04 LTS (deprecated: 8.10 LTS, 8.04, 7.10, 7.04) Hadoop 1.0.3, released May 2012 Sun Java 6 Disabling IPv6 Related:  antoniotan

Welcome to Apache Pig! Mind Mapping - Create Mind Maps online Installing hadoop development cluster on Windows and Eclipse Before we begin, make sure the following components are installed on your workstation: This tutorial had been written for and tested with the Hadoop version 0.19.1 if you are using another version some things might not work for you. Make sure that you have exactly the same versions of the software as shown above. Hadoop will not work with versions of Java prior to 1.6 and it will not work with the versions of Eclipse after 3.3.2 due to plugin API incompatibility. Installing Cygwin After you made sure that the above prerequisites are installed the next step would be to install the cygwin environment. To install the cygwin environment follow these steps: Download cygwin installer from here. Cygwin Installer When you see the above screen shot keep pressing 'Next' button until you see the package selection screen shown below. After you selected these packages press the 'Next' button to complete the installation. Continue

Running Hadoop On Ubuntu Linux (Multi-Node Cluster) @ Michael G. Noll In this tutorial I will describe the required steps for setting up a distributed, multi-nodeApache Hadoop cluster backed by the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS), running on Ubuntu Linux. Hadoop is a framework written in Java for running applications on large clusters of commodity hardware and incorporates features similar to those of the Google File System (GFS) and of the MapReduce computing paradigm. Hadoop’s HDFS is a highly fault-tolerant distributed file system and, like Hadoop in general, designed to be deployed on low-cost hardware. In a previous tutorial, I described how to setup up a Hadoop single-node cluster on an Ubuntu box. This tutorial has been tested with the following software versions: Ubuntu Linux 10.04 LTS (deprecated: 8.10 LTS, 8.04, 7.10, 7.04) Hadoop 1.0.3, released May 2012 Figure 1: Cluster of machines running Hadoop at Yahoo! From two single-node clusters to a multi-node cluster – We will build a multi-node cluster using two Ubuntu boxes in this tutorial.

Installing Ubuntu inside Windows using VirtualBox This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. The screenshots in this tutorial use Ubuntu 12.04, but the same principles apply also to Ubuntu 12.10, 11.10, 10.04, and any future version of Ubuntu. Actually, you can install pretty much any Linux distribution this way. Introduction VirtualBox allows you to run an entire operating system inside another operating system. Please be aware that you should have a minimum of 512 MB of RAM. 1 GB of RAM or more is recommended. Comparison to Dual-Boot Many websites (including the one you're reading) have tutorials on setting up dual-boots between Windows and Ubuntu. Advantages of virtual installation The size of the installation doesn't have to be predetermined. Follow these instructions to get a Ubuntu disk image (.iso file). After you launch VirtualBox from the Windows Start menu, click on New to create a new virtual machine. You can call the machine whatever you want. Click Next. Click Next again.

Vampire bat-inspired drone can fly and crawl Robot drones that can both fly and move about on land would vastly improve their usefulness by increasing the areas in which they could operate. Adding wheels of sufficient size to handle most terrains, however, would adversely increase both the weight and size of such a drone. Researchers at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL), building on their earlier developments, have created a drone that uses wings incorporating movable tips, allowing it to both walk and fly. The DALER (Deployable Air-Land Exploration Robot) drone was actually inspired by the vampire bat that uses the tips of its wings like legs when moving around on the ground. By studying and emulating the behavior of the vampire bat, the team created a wing covered in soft fabric that folds into a smaller space when on the ground and rotates around a hinge attaching the whegs to the body. The research was published in the journal Bionspiration and Biomimetics. Source: EPFL Share

Configuring Eclipse for Hadoop Development (a screencast) Update (added 5/15/2013): The information below is dated; see this post for current instructions about configuring Eclipse for Hadoop contributions. One of the perks of using Java is the availability of functional, cross-platform IDEs. I use vim for my daily editing needs, but when it comes to navigating, debugging, and coding large Java projects, I fire up Eclipse. Typically, when you’re developing Map-Reduce applications, you simply point Eclipse at the Apache Hadoop jar file, and you’re good to go. Eclipse for Hadoop Development from Cloudera. We’re interested in your feedback! P.S.: I “filmed” the screencast on Linux, but the same steps work on Mac OS X.

Why Europe’s Largest Ad Targeting Platform Uses Hadoop Richard Hutton, CTO of nugg.ad, authored the following post about how and why his company uses Apache Hadoop. nugg.ad operates Europe’s largest targeting platform. The company’s core business is to derive targeting recommendations from clicks and surveys. We measure these, store them in log files and later make sense of them all. In 2007 up until mid 2009 we used a classical data warehouse solution. As data volumes increased and performance suffered, we recognized that a new approach was needed. Data Processing Platform Requirements The nugg.ad service is split into two parts. Currently our online platform creates on a daily basis just over a 100 GB of log data per day. The logging of user interactions with our online platform creates considerable amounts of data. The initial solution for the data processing platform was built on the principles of classical data warehousing. In March 2008 we needed to process and use 30 GB of daily log data per day. Headache Turning Into a Migraine

Installing Ubuntu This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Future versions of this will be posted to my blog. NotesInstalling Ubuntu Notes This tutorial goes over the option of installing a traditional dual-boot. If you are using Mac OS X, the community documentation may help you out here. This tutorial features screenshots from Ubuntu 12.04 (Precise Pangolin). Installing Ubuntu Now that you have the Desktop CD, you'll need to reboot your computer to use Ubuntu. Your computer's BIOS must be set to boot from CD first; otherwise, Windows will just load up again. When you boot up, you'll see this blank screen with tiny logos on the bottom. When this appears, select your preferred language. If you have at least 512 MB of RAM, you may want to select Try Ubuntu, as it will allow you to do other things (check your email, browse the web) while you're installing Ubuntu. If you have only 256 MB or 384 MB of RAM, you should select Install Ubuntu. Select your language.

Cargo UAS set to deliver With the number of multi-rotor drone concepts competing for a narrow market share, you really need a unique selling point if you want to get your project off the ground. In the case of the developers of the Cargo Unmanned Air System (UAS), their point of difference is to claim a massive 60 kg (132 lb) lift capacity for their proof of concept, with the promise of an eventual production unmanned aerial vehicle that can carry payloads of up to 400 kg (880 lb) with automated "sense and avoid" capability. The UAS team envisage that items such as mail and parcels, food and water, or even medical supplies and emergency equipment could all be delivered more quickly and securely than is possible with ground transport. The aircraft's design includes basic landing skids for simplicity, whilst its open frame platform provides greater safety for ground crews to load and unload payloads from the rear of the vehicle. The UAS prototype airframe without wing coverings and outer skin Share

Admin Blog and More :: Installing Hadoop 0.20.2 in Ubuntu 11.04 x86 with Eclipse FamousPhil.com -- Home My Calendar Youtube LinkedIn Facebook MySpace Twitter RSS Blog Feed Blog Navigation Blog Home Older Entry: The state of FamousPhil.comNewer Entry: University at Buffalo – some departing photos Recommended Compiled ThoughtsDebbie Burger's PhotosFamousPhil.com on FaceBookskin whitening creamIsogenicsPartner with Us! Latest Activity Scaling a SNMP Version 3 trap receiver using Java Phil explains how to write a scalable SNMP Trap and Inform message receiver in Java using SNMP4J. Installing Hadoop 0.20.2 in Ubuntu 11.04 x86 with Eclipse This is the first post of a two part blog detailing Hadoop, the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) and Hadoop MapReduce configuration and programming. So let’s begin. Before I begin, it is important to note that there are several distributions of Hadoop out in the wild, and I found this to be the most confusing concept to understand during my research. Next, run “apt-get update” and then “apt-get install sun-java6-jdk”. hadoop-env.sh :

Hadoop Tutorial Introduction HDFS, the Hadoop Distributed File System, is a distributed file system designed to hold very large amounts of data (terabytes or even petabytes), and provide high-throughput access to this information. Files are stored in a redundant fashion across multiple machines to ensure their durability to failure and high availability to very parallel applications. This module introduces the design of this distributed file system and instructions on how to operate it. Goals for this Module: Understand the basic design of HDFS and how it relates to basic distributed file system concepts Learn how to set up and use HDFS from the command line Learn how to use HDFS in your applications Outline Distributed File System Basics A distributed file system is designed to hold a large amount of data and provide access to this data to many clients distributed across a network. NFS, the Network File System, is the most ubiquitous distributed file system. Configuring HDFS Cluster configuration

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