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Flip Learning

Flip Learning

http://www.fliplearning.com/

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Flipped Classroom 2.0: Competency Learning With Videos The flipped classroom model generated a lot of excitement initially, but more recently some educators — even those who were initial advocates — have expressed disillusionment with the idea of assigning students to watch instructional videos at home and work on problem solving and practice in class. Biggest criticisms: watching videos of lectures wasn’t all that revolutionary, that it perpetuated bad teaching and raised questions about equal access to digital technology. Now flipped classroom may have reached equilibrium, neither loved nor hated, just another potential tool for teachers — if done well. “You never want to get stuck in a rut and keep doing the same thing over and over,” said Aaron Sams, a former high school chemistry teacher turned consultant who helped pioneer flipped classroom learning in an edWeb webinar.

The Flipped Class: Myths vs. Reality Editor's Note: On the heels of our viral posts in over 100 countries about the flipped classroom earlier this year (links below), we asked Jon Bergmann if he could share some of the feedback he was receiving in light of the notable interest about this topic. The timing couldn't have been more perfect since he was about to leave for a conference about you-guessed-it, the flipped class. Here is Part 1 of our three part series The Daily Riff. See Part 2 and 3 links below. - C.J. The Teacher's Guide To Flipped Classrooms Since Jonathan Bergman and Aaron Sams first experimented with the idea in their Colorado classrooms in 2004, flipped learning has exploded onto the larger educational scene. It’s been one of the hottest topics in education for several years running and doesn’t seem to be losing steam. Basically, it all started when Bergman and Sams first came across a technology that makes it easy to record videos. They had a lot of students that regularly missed class and saw an opportunity to make sure that missing class didn’t mean missing out on the lessons.

Center for Teaching and Learning A flipped class (view image) is one that inverts the typical cycle of content acquisition and application so that students gain necessary knowledge before class, and instructors guide students to actively and interactively clarify and apply that knowledge during class. Like the best classes have always done, this approach supports instructors playing their most important role of guiding their students to deeper thinking and higher levels of application. A flipped class keeps student learning at the center of teaching. Learn More CTE - Collaborative Learning What is collaborative learning? What is the impact of collaborative learning or group work? What are some examples of collaborative learning activities? 9 Video Tips for a Better Flipped Classroom Flipped Classroom | November 2013 Digital Edition 9 Video Tips for a Better Flipped Classroom Early adopters share how schools can find success with teachers and students alike--even when the technology seems as topsy-turvy as the lessons.

Social Development Theory (Vygotsky) Summary: Social Development Theory argues that social interaction precedes development; consciousness and cognition are the end product of socialization and social behavior. Originator: Lev Vygotsky (1896-1934). Key terms: Zone of Proximal Development (ZPD), More Knowledgeable Other (MKO) Vygotsky’s Social Development Theory The flipped classroom: in elementary school, too? - DreamBox Learning By @DreamBox_Learn on March 3rd, 2014 High school chemistry teachers, Jonathan Bergmann and Aaron Sams have been given credit for inventing the flipped classroom, but they don’t make that claim. The teachers credit Maureen Lage, Glenn Platt, and Michael Treglia (2000) for their research article “Inverting the Classroom” A Gateway to Creating an Inclusive Learning Environment.” No matter who began it, classroom flipping is rising in popularity. According to the Flipped Learning Network membership on its social media site rose from 2,500 teachers in 2011 to 9,000 teachers in 2012. Used primarily in high school and college, the flipped classroom is starting to gain some traction in elementary schools.

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