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Yoga Sutras of Patanjali

Yoga Sutras of Patanjali
The Yoga Sūtras of Patañjali are 196 Indian sūtras (aphorisms) that constitute the foundational text of Ashtanga Yoga, also called Raja Yoga. In medieval times, Ashtanga Yoga was cast as one of the six orthodox āstika schools of Hindu philosophy. The Yoga Sutras were compiled around 400 CE by Patañjali, taking materials about yoga from older traditions. Together with his commentary they form the Pātañjalayogaśāstra. Author and dating[edit] Author[edit] The Indian tradition attributes the work to Patañjali. Dating[edit] The most recent assessment of Patañjali's date, developed in the context of the first critical edition ever made of the Yoga Sūtras and bhāṣya based on a study of the surviving original Sanskrit manuscripts of the work, is that of Philipp A. Compilation[edit] The Yoga Sutras are a composite of various texts. Contents[edit] Structure of the text[edit] The eight limbs of Yoga[edit] Yama refers to the five abstentions: how we relate to the external world. Ananda and asmita[edit]

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Upanishads Upanishads SwamiJ.com Upanishad is the subtler, mystical or yogic teachings of the philosophy and practices leading to the direct experience of the center of consciousness, the absolute reality. "Upa" means "near;" "ni" means "down;" "shad" means "to sit." Thus, Upanishad is to sit down near the teacher to discuss, learn, practice and experience the means and goals of Yoga sadhana or practices. The Upanishads are also known as Vedanta, which means the end or culmination of the Vedas. There are some 200 or more texts entitled as Upanishads, although some are lost, only known about because of being referenced in other Upanishads.

Edgar Cayce Edgar Cayce (/ˈkeɪsiː/; March 18, 1877 – January 3, 1945) was an American psychic who allegedly possessed the ability to answer questions on subjects as varied as healing, reincarnation, wars, Atlantis and future events while in a trance. These answers came to be known as "life readings of the entity" and were usually delivered to individuals while Cayce was hypnotized. This ability gave him the nickname "The Sleeping Prophet". Cayce founded a nonprofit organization, the Association for Research and Enlightenment[1] that included a hospital and a university. Cayce became a celebrity toward the end of his life, and he believed the publicity given to his prophecies overshadowed the more important parts of his work, such as healing the sick and studying religion. Skeptics[3] challenge Cayce's alleged psychic abilities and traditional Christians also question his unorthodox answers on religious matters such as reincarnation and the Akashic records.

Ashtanga vinyasa yoga This article is about a style of yoga consisting of six series founded by K. Pattabhi Jois. For the eightfold yoga path, a system first described in Patañjali's Yoga Sūtras, see Rāja (Ashtanga) Yoga. Ashtanga vinyasa yoga, usually referred to simply as Ashtanga yoga, is a style of yoga codified[1][2] and popularized by K. Pattabhi Jois and is often promoted as a modern-day form of classical Indian yoga.[3] Pattabhi Jois began his yoga studies in 1927 at the age of 12, and by 1948 had established the Ashtanga Yoga Research Institute for teaching the specific yoga practice known as Ashtanga (Sanskrit for "eight-limbed") Yoga.[4] Ashtanga Yoga is named after the eight limbs of yoga mentioned in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali.[5]

Tummo Tummo (Tibetan: gtum-mo; Sanskrit: caṇḍālī) is a form of breathing, found in the Six Yogas of Naropa,[1] Lamdre, Kalachakra and Anuyoga teachings of Tibetan Vajrayana. Tummo originally derives from Indian Vajrayana tradition, including the instruction of the Mahasiddha Krishnacarya and the Hevajra Tantra. The purpose of tummo is to gain control over body processes during the completion stage of 'highest yoga tantra' (Anuttarayoga Tantra) or Anuyoga. Nomenclature, orthography and etymology[edit]

Yoga Sutras of Patanjali - Introduction Click here for the Yoga Sutras Summary page What are the Yoga Sutras?: The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali succinctly outlines the art and science of traditional Yoga meditation for Self-Realization. It is a process of systematically encountering, examining, and transcending each of the various gross and subtle levels of false identity in the mind field, until the jewel of the true Self comes shining through. Jnana Jnana or gnana or gnaan (Sanskrit; Pali: jñāna) is a Sanskrit word that means knowledge. It has various nuances of meaning depending on the context, and is used in a number of different Indian religions. The idea of jnana centers around a cognitive event which is recognized when experienced.[1] It is knowledge inseparable from the total experience of reality, especially a total reality,[1] or supreme being within Mahesha-dhama (and/or material world) such as Siva-Sakti.[2] Absence of jnana (knowledge, gnosticism) is known as ajnana (see: agnosticism): Famous mantra in this relationship says: "Om ajnana timirandhasya..." (I was born in ajnana, agnosticism, but my spiritual master opened my eyes with fire of transcendental knowledge, jnana). In Buddhist philosophy[edit] In Tibetan Buddhism, it refers to pure awareness that is free of conceptual encumbrances, and is contrasted with vijnana, which is a moment of 'divided knowing'.

K. Pattabhi Jois Sri K. Pattabhi Jois (Kannada: ಶ್ರೀ ಕೃಷ್ಣ ಪಟ್ಟಾಭಿ ಜೋಯೀಸರು) (July 26, 1915[1] – May 18, 2009[2]) was an Indian yoga teacher who developed the popular and gymnastic style of yoga referred to as Ashtanga Vinyasa Yoga or Ashtanga Yoga.[3] In 1948, Jois established the Ashtanga Yoga Research Institute (now known as the Shri K Pattabhi Jois Ashtanga Yoga Institute)[4] in Mysore, India.[5] Early life and education[edit] Vishuddha Vishuddha (Sanskrit: विशुद्ध, IAST: Viśuddha, English: "especially pure"), or Vishuddhi, or throat chakra is the fifth primary chakra according to the Hindu tradition.[1] Description[edit] Location[edit] Vishuddha is positioned at the neck region, near the spine, with its Kshetram or superficial activation point in the pit of the throat. Hence, it is also known as the throat chakra.[2] Appearance[edit]

Hatha Yoga Pradipika Hatha Yoga Pradipika by Svatmarama, 15th century CE, translationed by various scholars (believed to be in the public domain) The Hatha Yoga Pradipika is a classical text describing Hatha Yoga. It is said to be the oldest surviving text on Hatha Yoga. Spiritism Allan Kardec, The Codifier of Spiritism Spiritism is a doctrine codified in the 19th century by the French educator Allan Kardec. Spiritism soon spread to other countries, having today 35 countries represented in the International Spiritist Council.[1] Origins[edit] Spiritism is based on the five books of the Spiritist Codification written by French educator Hypolite Léon Denizard Rivail under the pseudonym Allan Kardec reporting séances in which he observed a series of phenomena that were attributed to incorporeal intelligence (spirits).

Practice tools Archives - revolutionary habit In Ashtanga it’s traditional to have Led Primary classes on a Friday. Of course it’s best if you can practice regularly with your teacher, though us home ashtangis need to make do. Having some free tools I can go back to and be lead with the count really helps keep me on track and focused, week after week. These videos are to be watched, observed, learnt from – but they can also work as free tools to help practice ashtanga led at home. Roll out your mat, chant, play the video, turn the sound up, practice.

Hatha Yoga Pradipika The Haṭha Yoga Pradīpikā (Sanskrit: haṭhayōgapradīpikā, हठयोगप्रदीपिका) is a classic Sanskrit manual on hatha yoga, written by Svāmi Svātmārāma, a disciple of Swami Gorakhnath. It is amongst the most influential surviving texts on the hatha yoga, and is one of the three classic texts of hatha yoga, the other two being the Gheranda Samhita and the Shiva Samhita. A fourth major text, written at a later date by Srinivasabhatta Mahayogaindra, is the Hatharatnavali.[1] Different manuscripts of this work offer various versions of its title. The database of the A. C. Theosophy Theosophy (from Greek θεοσοφία theosophia, from θεός theos, God[1] + σοφία sophia, wisdom; literally "God's wisdom"), refers to systems of esoteric philosophy concerning, or investigation seeking direct knowledge of, presumed mysteries of being and nature, particularly concerning the nature of divinity. Theosophy is considered a part of the broader field of esotericism, referring to hidden knowledge or wisdom that offers the individual enlightenment and salvation. "The English word esoteric is derived from the Greek word esōterikos, which is attested in ii AD in the writing of Galenus Medicus." [2] [3] The theosophist seeks to understand the mysteries of the universe and the bonds that unite the universe, humanity, and the divine. The goal of theosophy is to explore the origin of divinity and humanity, and the world. From investigation of those topics, theosophists try to discover a coherent description of the purpose and origin of the universe. Etymology[edit]

Best Free Yoga Videos for Beginners I’ve been practicing yoga almost daily for over 4 years, and more than half that time was with free online videos. I continue to learn a lot from the many delights of YouTube. I hope this collection is a useful resource for anybody who wants to (re) start a yoga practice. It’s kind of a taster of what’s out there. In general, whatever you decide to, listen to your body!

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