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Why we love repetition in music - Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis

Why we love repetition in music - Elizabeth Hellmuth Margulis

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1lo8EomDrwA

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The 50 Greatest Jazz Albums…Ever At the end of any year it’s a great time to look back and so we’ve decided to attempt to come up with a definitive list of the 50 Greatest Jazz Albums of all time. Impossible, you are probably thinking, and it probably is, but rather than just thinking of our favourites we decided to take a good look through the web to see what other lists there are and combine our findings. As usual we expect many of you to disagree, sometimes strongly, but as usual we will love hearing from you. It took us several days of searching but here it is, the 50 greatest… In a bold move, Hampshire College says it will no longer require applicants to take the SATs OR the ACTs Imagine a world with no SATs or ACTs. It would mean no prep courses, no frantically searching for a sharpened #2 pencil, no more Saturday mornings sitting in a classroom trying to find “x” for the twentieth time that day. Students would be accepted to college based on, what, who they are as people? It sounds like an impossible fantasy, right? But one school might be laying the groundwork to abolish standardized testing from college applications, so we may someday get to see that world. Hampshire College is considered one of the top schools in the country for its percentage of grads who go on to graduate school.

This is What Michael Jackson Sounds Like in Quechua Even the youngs think Quechua is cool. After the language was translated for a book, a song, and given a shoutout by a fútbolero, we started thinking that Quechua was having a sort of moment. Perhaps the biggest sign of this is that a 14-year-old girl named Renata Flores sang a Quechua version of Michael Jackson’s “The Way You Make Me Feel.” The difference between classical and operant conditioning - Peggy Andover As a cognitive-behavioral therapist, Dr. Andover uses empirically-supported techniques to treat clients ranging in age from childhood to adulthood with a variety of presenting problems.Ivan Petrovich Pavlov was a famous Russian physiologist. From his childhood days ,Pavlov demonstrated intellectual brilliance along with an unusual energy which he named "the instinct for research".

Key Chords Key Chords app generates guitar chord progressions automatically. Use it free online, or get the app for Mac, Windows or iOS (iPad) - Click on a chord to preview how it sounds. - Drag and drop to arrange the chord progression - Tweak the settings to control the playback speed Stress and the Social Self: How Relationships Affect Our Immune System Relationships, Adrienne Rich argued in her magnificent meditation on love, refine our truths. But they also, it turns out, refine our immune systems. That’s what pioneering immunologist Esther Sternberg examines in The Balance Within: The Science Connecting Health and Emotions (public library) — a revelatory inquiry into how emotional stress affects our susceptibility to burnout and disease. As just about every socialized human being can attest, interpersonal relationships play a significant role in our experience of stress — either contributing to it and or alleviating it. And the way we connect — something psychologist Barbara Fredrickson has termed “positivity resonance” — is deeply patterned through our earliest experiences of bonding, which train our limbic pathways. Sternberg traces the cognitive origin of these formative patterns:

NPR Music's 50 Favorite Albums Of 2015 This is how we listen: Take 12 months, a few thousand albums and pan for gold. We sift for works that are definitive and for sounds or songs that cross boundaries, make connections, teach us something new. We allow ourselves to be swept away, to be seduced, to be fooled by a good new trick or an old one produced with grace and confidence. 2015 was a year in which the fractures in the music industry's bedrock became everyday geography — a no man's land of streaming, downloads, CDs and LPs, with plenty of skirmishes and territory disputes. It was also one in which sales records were not just broken but demolished.

Why We Fall in Love: The Paradoxical Psychology of Romance and Why Frustration Is Necessary for Satisfaction Adrienne Rich, in contemplating how love refines our truths, wrote: “An honorable human relationship — that is, one in which two people have the right to use the word ‘love’ — is a process, delicate, violent, often terrifying to both persons involved, a process of refining the truths they can tell each other.” But among the dualities that lend love both its electricity and its exasperation — the interplay of thrill and terror, desire and disappointment, longing and anticipatory loss — is also the fact that our pathway to this mutually refining truth must pass through a necessary fiction: We fall in love not just with a person wholly external to us but with a fantasy of how that person can fill what is missing from our interior lives. Psychoanalyst Adam Phillips addresses this central paradox with uncommon clarity and elegance in Missing Out: In Praise of the Unlived Life (public library). Phillips writes:

Rhiannon Giddens Speaks For The Silenced "This instrument right here, born in Africa, but then made in America and then altered by white America — that's the story of so much of our music," Rhiannon Giddens says of the banjo. John Peets/Courtesy of the artist hide caption toggle caption John Peets/Courtesy of the artist Psychologist Barry Schwartz on What Motivates Us to Work, Why Incentives Fail, and How Our Ideas About Human Nature Shape Who We Become By Maria Popova The organism we call culture — all of our art and literature and human thought — is in a constant symbiotic dance with human nature. Our culture both reflects who we are — our values, our hopes, our fears, our ideals — and shapes who we become by immersing us in its collectively agreed upon mythology, systematically perpetuating certain values and negating others. E.B. White knew this when he considered the responsibility of the writer and asserted that “writers do not merely reflect and interpret life, they inform and shape life.” It’s a perennial dialogue between our nature and what we come to believe is our nature, perhaps best captured by the physicist David Bohm in his 1977 Berkeley lecture: “Reality is what we take to be true.

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