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How To Start Integrating Coding Into Project Based Learning – from Kate Wilson

How To Start Integrating Coding Into Project Based Learning – from Kate Wilson
This post first appeared on Edudemic. True Project Based Learning (PBL) challenges students to acquire deeper knowledge of a concept by establishing connections outside their classroom. According to the research on PBL, the main tenets are to create real world connections, develop critical thinking skills, foster structured collaboration, motivate student driven work, and enable a multifaceted approach. Similarly, coding applies all of these core tenets as programs require logical thinking, team work, a variety of tools, and – most importantly – perseverance on the part of the student. Consider the potential of applying the challenges of coding to the proven successful tenets of PBL. Coding Application: Find a solution to a problem by creating an App or Website Douglas Kiang (@dkiang), AP Computer Science teacher at Punahou School, used PBL in his classroom to encourage his students to connect with their community. Coding application: Coding requires a series of logical steps Related

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The 35 Best Web 2.0 Classroom Tools Chosen By You If you’re not an avid follower of #edchat on Twitter, you may be missing out on a great opportunity to learn about some new Web 2.0 tools that are currently being used in classrooms around the world. That’s because @chickensaltash posed a simple question to the PLN and there has been a huge swell of support as hundreds of people have jumped in to answer the question about which 5 Web 2.0 tools teachers are using in classrooms. The Best of the Best You can view the live stream of #edchat here and see what people are saying at the hashtag #chickenweb2tools here. We scoured hundreds of responses and have come up with the following list. The following tools have not been verified and are simply based on the number of times each was mentioned on Twitter during this hashtag discussion.

NOVA Injecting Stem Cells Directly Into the Brain Lets Stroke Patients Walk Again This technique could help repair stroke patients’ brains, bringing hope to those living with paralysis. From NOVA Next | Jun 7, 2016 Beauty in Physics, Synthetic Genomes, and More: Week in Review NOVA Next rounds up the best science stories for the week ending June 3, 2016. From NOVA Next | Jun 5, 2016 Ready to Learn Coding? Here are resources. Plus: Teaching with Scratch There are several ways to start learning about code, and each offers something a little different. Not all coding sites are created equal, and not every site or initiative works for every teacher or learner. A playful, introductory experience might not satisfy a teacher looking for a civic-minded coding experience, while an in-depth tutorial on programming games might not be the best starting place for a kid interested in web design. For novices, there are many ways to enter the coding ecosystem. Online coding lessons <Here’s Where to go/> Several sites offer free, online, self-paced lessons to help you learn text-based code—coding in the raw, so to speak.

Launching a Makerspace: Lessons Learned From a Transformed School Library Excitement about school makerspaces has been in the air, but many educators eager to create hands-on learning spaces in their schools still aren’t sure how to get started or why it’s worth the effort. New Canaan High School librarian Michelle Luhtala recently jumped headfirst into creating a makerspace in her library and documented what she learned, how her space changed and how it affected students along the way. Her experience was very different from elementary school librarian Andy Plemmons, whose makerspace started with a 3-D printer obtained through a grant and blossomed into a core teaching resource at his school. Luhtala is blessed with a big library, but for most of her career it has been dominated by large bookshelves. Over time, Luhtala has pared down her collection as she increased the digital reading material the library offers, but in order to make room for a makerspace she cleared out 7,000 books. A floor plan of shelving in Luhtala’s library in 2011.

Three Tips for Classroom Blogging Projects Posted by Bill Ferriter on Wednesday, 08/27/2014 Just getting back to school with your students? Interested in trying to pull off a classroom blogging project this year? Then these three tips -- based on almost ten years of trying to make blogging a part of the work that my students do in the classroom -- might be useful to you:

Coding on iPads – Beginner to Pro Code and programming may not be the most important topics on the planet but it is an area of study that sufferers two major problems. one: an industry with millions of unfilled job positions and two: a world where not enough teachers feel confident to run programming projects. The iPad can offer a solution in these situations. There’s an app for that (and a generation) Fortunately, the world of code education is getting easier and more self-sufficient every month.

Where to Find Good Educational Videos There’s a right and a wrong way to use videos in the classroom. Not all videos are primed for instructional use, and not all instruction lends itself to video. However, pairing a great video with the tools students need to engage with it can lead to a deeper understanding of or alternate perspective on what’s being taught. Check out the September Education Update article “Showing Videos in the Classroom: What’s the Purpose?” to learn three criteria for selecting an effective video and find tips for helping your students “make the shift from vegging out to tuning in for learning.” Once you have identified the criteria to look for, there are tons of places to find both instructional and supplemental videos on whatever topic you’re teaching.

Teach Your Kids to Code: 6 Beginner's Resources for Parents Introducing computer programming to your kids can be a challenge, especially for those who aren’t familiar with the nuances of code. Fortunately, in the last few years, a number of apps, software, and guides have been produced that make the often-complex subject of computer coding easy to grasp for young learners. So where to begin? These are a few resources that parents can share with their kids to help them start learning about programming. Programming Tutorials From Made With Code by Google: Google's Made With Code project has a mission of encouraging girls to pursue careers in computer science. The Made With Code projects are easy to follow, and if your kids are completely new to coding, don't fret.

Gooru: A search engine for learning... EdTech Published on March 2nd, 2014 | by Mark Anderson I’ve sung the praises of Gooru for some time now but haven’t blogged about it and thought it was about time that I did. Gooru is great as a launch page for browsers in schools because of the content it kicks you off with. It might not give you the complete power of Google, but it’s not half bad! Coding in the Classroom: 16 Top Resources As cool as technology is, its intricacies and inner workings are sometimes intimidating, especially for young people who may be more interested in what technology can do for them rather than what they can do with technology. However, when students hurdle that obstacle and see the value of computer science — specifically coding — they gain a broadened perspective and the potential for a rewarding career in the tech field. The following resources will help you teach your students the basics of coding and will provide tips on how to keep kids interested as you go. Tools to Use in Class Can you make coding fun for your students? Absolutely!

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