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Grimoire

Grimoire
While the term grimoire is originally European and many Europeans throughout history, particularly ceremonial magicians and cunning folk, have made use of grimoires, the historian Owen Davies noted that similar books can be found all across the world, ranging from Jamaica to Sumatra,[3] and he also noted that the first grimoires could be found not in Europe but in the Ancient Near East.[4] Etymology[edit] History[edit] Ancient period[edit] "Many of those [in Ephesus] who believed [in Christianity] now came and openly confessed their evil deeds. A number who had practised sorcery brought their scrolls together and burned them publicly. Notwithstanding the accounts of Biblical figures like Moses, Enoch and Solomon being associated with magical practices, when Christianity became the dominant faith of the Roman Empire, the early Church frowned upon the propagation of books on magic, connecting it with paganism, and burned books of magic. Medieval period[edit] Early modern period[edit] Related:  Paranormal

New Age The New Age is a term applied to a range of spiritual or religious beliefs and practices that developed in Western nations during the 1970s. Precise scholarly definitions of the movement differ in their emphasis, largely as a result of its highly eclectic structure. Although analytically often considered to be religious, those involved in it typically prefer the designation of "spiritual" and rarely use the term "New Age" themselves. As a form of Western esotericism, the New Age movement drew heavily upon a number of older esoteric traditions, in particular those that emerged from the occultist current that developed in the eighteenth century. Despite its highly eclectic nature, a number of beliefs commonly found within the New Age movement have been identified. Those involved in the New Age movement have been primarily from middle and upper-middle-class backgrounds. Definition[edit] — Religious studies scholar Daren Kemp, 2004. — Scholar of esotericism Wouter Hanegraaff, 1996. [edit]

Plants and Their Magical Uses - Unexplained - IN SEARCH FOR TRUTH - RIN.RU ACACIA -Blessing, raising of vibration, protection via spiritual elevation. AGRIMONY (Cocklebur) -Helps to overcome fear, dispel negative emotions, overcome inner blockages. ALLSPICE -Adds strength to Will, gives determination and perseverance. Gives added vitality, energy. Also good for social gatherings -increases harmony, sympathy and co-operation between people. Stimulates friendly interaction and conversation. ALMOND -Attracts money. ALOE -Promotes patience, persistence, resolve. AMBER -Mental clarity and focus. AMBERGRIS -Strengthens the effect of anything it's added to or used with. ANISE -Psychic opening, clairvoyance, opens Third Eye. APHRODISIA -Passion, sexuality, romance. APPLE or APPLE BLOSSOM -Promotes peace of mind, contentment, happiness,success in all undertakings. APRICOT -Encourages sexuality and sensual passion. ASOFOETIDA -Protection, banishing negativity. AZALEA -Encourages light spirits, happiness, gaiety. BANANA -Helps to overcome serious blockages or obstacles. St.

Grimoires Warning : the following documents deal with magic and should not be used without proper care and deep knowledge of this art. The word grimoire is from the Old French grammaire, or grammar. Latin "grammars" (books on Latin syntax and diction) were considered in the Middle Ages as books of basic instruction. Today, a grimoire is considered as a book of magical knowledge, with instructions for its use to achieve certain ends. They contain various magical formulas or symbols such as astrological correspondences, incantations and ritual instructions for working with angels and conjuring spirits and demons as well as directions on casting charms and spells, on mixing medicines, and making talismans. To understand the real content, one must delve into the life and times of the magicians who wrote them and decipher the symbols that were used to hide the real secrets. More about the Necronomicon

Paimon - Wikipedia "Labal" redirects here. For the village in Iran, see Labal, Iran. According to The Goetia: The Lesser Key of Solomon the King, Paimon is one of the Kings of Hell, more obedient to Lucifer than other kings are, and has two hundred (one hundred according to other authors) legions of demons under his rule. He has a great voice and roars as soon as he comes, speaking in this manner for a while, until the conjurer compels him and then he answers clearly the questions he is asked. When the conjurer invokes this demon he must look towards the northwest (the west to other authors), for there is where he has his house, and when Paimon appears he must be allowed to ask what he wishes and be answered, in order to obtain the same from him. Other spellings: Paimonia, Paymon According to S. See also[edit] Sources[edit]

Sigil (magic) In medieval ceremonial magic, the term sigil was commonly used to refer to occult signs which represented various angels and demons which the magician might summon. The magical training books called grimoires often listed pages of such sigils. A particularly well-known list is in The Lesser Key of Solomon, in which the sigils of the 72 princes of the hierarchy of hell are given for the magician's use. Such sigils were considered to be the equivalent of the true name of the spirit and thus granted the magician a measure of control over the beings. The use of symbols for magical or cultic purposes has been widespread since at least the Neolithic era. In modern uses, the concept was mostly popularized by Austin Osman Spare, who published a method by which the words of a statement of intent are reduced into an abstract design; the sigil is then charged with the will of the creator.

Emerald Tablet An imaginative 17th century depiction of the Emerald Tablet from the work of Heinrich Khunrath, 1606. The Emerald Tablet, also known as the Smaragdine Table, or Tabula Smaragdina, is a compact and cryptic piece of Hermetica reputed to contain the secret of the prima materia and its transmutation. It was highly regarded by European alchemists as the foundation of their art and its Hermetic tradition. The original source of the Emerald Tablet is unknown. Although Hermes Trismegistus is the author named in the text, its first known appearance is in a book written in Arabic between the sixth and eighth centuries. Textual history[edit] The tablet text[edit] Newton's translation[edit] A translation by Isaac Newton is found among his alchemical papers that are currently housed in King's College Library, Cambridge University.[8] Theatrum Chemicum translation[edit] Another translation can be found in Theatrum Chemicum, Volume IV (1613), in Georg Beatus' Aureliae Occultae Philosophorum:[9][10] C.G.

Magical Properties of Herbs Acacia (Acacia Nilotica) Also called gum arabic. Gender: Masculine, Planet: Sun, Element: Air, Deities: Osiris, Astarte, Diana, Ra Protection, Psychic Powers. Burn with sandalwood to open psychic centers. Parts used: dried gum, leaves, wood Aconite (Aconitum Napellus) Also called wolfsbane, monkshood, blue rocket *POISON* Don't ingest. Protection, Invisibility. African Violet (Saintpaulia ionantha) Gender: Feminine, Planet: Venus, Element: Water Spirituality, Protection. Agaric (Amanita muscaria) aka magic mushroom, redcap, death angel, death cap Gender: Masculine, Planet: Mercury, Element: Air, Deity: Dionysus Fertility. Agrimony (Agrimonia eupatoria) Also called Church steeples, cocklebur, stickwort, sticklewort Gender: Masculine, Planet: Jupiter, Element: Air Protection, Sleep. Alfalfa (Medicavo Sativa) Gender: Feminine, Planet: Venus, Element: Earth Prosperity, Anti-hunger, Money. Allspice (Pimenta officinalis or P. dioica) Masculine, Mars, Fire Money, Luck, Healing. Protection, Luck.

Resurrection - New Hampshire's Longest Running Goth/Industrial Club Night Lesser Key of Solomon - Wikipedia The Lesser Key of Solomon, also known as Clavicula Salomonis Regis[note 1] or Lemegeton, is an anonymous grimoire (or spell book) on demonology. It was compiled in the mid-17th century, mostly from materials a couple of centuries older.[1][2] It is divided into five books—the Ars Goetia, Ars Theurgia-Goetia, Ars Paulina, Ars Almadel, and Ars Notoria.[1][3] Ars Goetia[edit] The most obvious source for the Ars Goetia is Johann Weyer's Pseudomonarchia Daemonum in his De praestigiis daemonum. Weyer does not cite, and is unaware of, any other books in the Lemegeton, indicating that the Lemegeton was derived from his work, not the other way around.[1][4] The order of the spirits was changed between the two, four additional spirits were added to the later work, and one spirit (Pruflas) was omitted. This portion of the work was later translated by S. The Seventy-Two Demons[edit] Ars Theurgia Goetia[edit] Ars Paulina[edit] Ars Almadel[edit] Ars Notoria[edit] Editions and translations[edit] Notes[edit]

Ley line Ley lines /leɪ laɪnz/ are supposed alignments of numerous places of geographical and historical interest, such as ancient monuments and megaliths, natural ridge-tops and water-fords. The phrase was coined in 1921 by the amateur archaeologist Alfred Watkins, in his books Early British Trackways and The Old Straight Track. He sought to identify ancient trackways in the British landscape. Watkins later developed theories that these alignments were created for ease of overland trekking by line-of-sight navigation during neolithic times, and had persisted in the landscape over millennia.[1] Since the publication of Michell's book, the spiritualised version of the concept has been adopted by other authors and applied to landscapes in many places around the world. Alfred Watkins and The Old Straight Track[edit] On 30 June 1921, Alfred Watkins visited Blackwardine in Herefordshire, and had been driving along a road near the village (which has now virtually disappeared). His work referred to G.

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