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Resource: An A-Z of Twitter for Educators

Resource: An A-Z of Twitter for Educators
Related:  Using Twitter in EducationICLTTwitter in the classroom

10 tips for Tweeting Teachers by After several years of tweeting, it’s about time I published my own Tips for Tweeting Teachers. 10 Tips for Tweeting Teachers This list is designed for teachers new to Twitter, or for those who have started out and need advice. In the blog, I have divided my top-10 suggestions into three levels for beginners, intermediate and advanced users. Audio Player Beginners: Create a professional account for tweeting about teaching. Decide if you want to have a private (locked) account. Start by creating a handle. @TeacherToolkit stemmed from what I do. Add a profile image that is good in quality. Define a purpose for your Twitter account. If you do not have a purpose for using Twitter from a teaching perspective, your account will become muddled between personal updates and teaching information. Every Twitter hashtag – relating to education – can be found here. Intermediate: 4, Now you have your account, it’s time to think more about your tweets and who to follow! 5. Advanced: Twitter Analysis.

Twitter for Teachers, a resource Published on April 5th, 2015 | by Mark Anderson I was reminded last week on the power of Twitter which brought together 250 education professionals to London for #TMLondon. Selfies, trending, hashtag, learning and sharing all took place and not only were there 250 teachers there, there were more than 200 viewing online at the same time too. It was phenomenal. It got me thinking again about the power of Twitter. At the same time, I’ve come across another brilliant iPad app by the long-standing graphic and media software giant Adobe called, Adobe Slate. A Teacher’s 3 Twitter Accounts Twitter is the simplest system available to interact with the web and share resources. Twitter is built into the iPad’s operating system and so an account allows you to share any photo, website or resource immediately without fuss. Its system is the opposite to Facebook and expects you to operate numerous accounts for different purposes. @EDUCATOR – Tweet as an Educator The first account is your ‘Educator’s’ account (mine’s @iPadWells) with which you interact with other teachers and share resources. @TEACHER – Tweet as a classroom teacher Create an account for your classroom activities with your students. Take photos of good student work during any day. @Dept – Tweet as a Department or School This is something I’m just setting up now. Here’s the list of ideas so far: All colleagues get to see best practice within the same department / school. Conclusion The whole iPad is now designed to be the perfect management tool for organising these 3 streams of information as you go through your day.

Teacher's Visual Guide to Creating Twitter Lists June 10, 2014 A Twitter list is a curated group of Twitter users and a great way to organize your interests. You can use them to categorize and organize tweets into different categories relevant to the information you are seeking. You can for instance create a list about educational technology and add to it Edtech tweeters you follow. In this way , you will have a pool of resources aggregated in a single page to access anytime you want. You can create your own lists or subscribe to lists created by others. Here is how to create your own Twitter list: 1- Head over to your Twitter homepage and click on the "gear" button on the top right and select "lists" 2- Click on " Create new list" 3- Type in a name and description to your list. 4- Use Twitter search to add people to your list. Another way to add people is through their profile page.On the profile page of the Tweeter you want to add to your list, click on " add or remove from lists".

90+ Twitter Tools Teachers Should Know about Twitter is the topical theme of my MAED thesis and I have been assembling and compiling several resources and academic papers on this topic. I also have a special section under the title "Twitter for Teachers" where I share with my fellow teachers and readers all the tips and tools they need to tap into the educational potential of this microblogging platform. Managing TwitterThese tools will help make managing your Twitter account just a bit easier.

A Refreshingly Simple Guide To Twitter For Teachers Teachers are on Twitter every minute of every day. There are daily hashtag chats where educators from around the globe collaborate, share interesting tidbits, and make lifelong connections never before possible. There are people with tens of thousands of followers who are viewed as thought and opinion leaders. It’s a minute-by-minute pulse of the education world. It’s exhausting. It’s overwhelming. It’s hard to imagine where to start. That’s the idea behind this simple visual guide to Twitter for teachers who are either new to the social network or simply need a refresher about why they got started in the first place. So if you’re scared of getting started with Twitter, this is a great first visual to check out. This image is a little bit dated (uses old icons, etc.) but the usefulness remains. Source: Rossier Online

Map creator online to make a map with multiple color pins and regions New Wonderful Twitter Guide for Teachers and Educators June 18, 2014 As I have repeatedly stated in several instances here in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning, online social networking remains one of the powerful routes to any effective and sustained teacher professional development plans. Social networks open up a whole new horizon of promising opportunities for on-the-go and at-any-time learning. One of the preeminent social networking site in this regard is the microblogging platform Twitter. The power of Twitter resides in the kind of connections and networks it allows you to make.Twitter is by far the social networking platform that teachers and educators populate the most. Using Twitter to grow professionally is a theme I have extensively talked about in previous posts ( see this post or this one ). This visual is created by UKEdChat.

The Twitteraholic’s Ultimate Guide to tweets, hashtags, and all things Twitter Most educators who learn to use Twitter effectively say they learn more from their personal learning network (PLN) on Twitter than they’ve achieved from any other forms of professional development or personal learning. Unfortunately educators often dismiss Twitter, or fail to see the value of Twitter, when they’re first introduced to Twitter. Our aim of this post is to provide all the information you need to learn how to use Twitter effectively as an educator. We regularly update this post with new information. Click on a link below to go to the section you want to read: About the Twitter-a-holic’s Ultimate Guide The original Twitter-a-holic’s Guide was published in July, 2010 when I’d just returned from attending a large conference overseas and realized that while a conference can make you feel really overwhelmed and alone — especially amongst the 13,000 ed tech professionals participants who attend it each year — I never felt alone. Why? Back to Top Introduction to Twitter Be patient. Handle

Mark Anderson's Blog | education, learning & technology EdTech Published on September 9th, 2013 | by Mark Anderson 11inShare Many is the blog post which highlights the ways in which Twitter is the best staffroom in the world but I’ve not seen too many that highlight the ways in which we can use Twitter in the classroom. Many teachers love to use Twitter as a resource to share, explore, discuss and ‘magpie’ ideas from other teachers and as a vehicle to help develop their own ideas and their own practice too. It’s great for that… no, it’s absolutely brilliant for that! Do’s 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. With all these lesson ideas, and they are by no means exhaustive – there are some things that you really should make sure too that you do not do… Don’ts 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. I am sure that you can add your own ideas to these, please share them in the comments below.

Twitter is a Teacher Superpower! “We all know that education budgets are getting cut more and more, and that meaningful professional development opportunities have unfortunately become a bit of an oxymoron in education. Not only can being a “connected educator” help change that, but it can also provide you with ongoing inspiration and support. I’d even go as far to argue that being connected will be the most impactful thing you can do in your career.” Elana Leoni, blogger for Edutopia. I will even go far enough to say that becoming a connected educator is a Teacher Superpower! While I can come up with pretty new and innovative ideas while planning inside my classroom, I can gain so much more from sharing my ideas, collecting ideas on Twitter (known jokingly as #ideabandits), and connecting with other educators to collaborate about even more inspiring ideas. Here is how: Get yourself logged onto Twitter and sign up for an account using your computer, iPad, or smartphone. Next step is to add an image of yourself.

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