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What the best education systems are doing right

What the best education systems are doing right
In South Korea and Finland, it’s not about finding the “right” school. Fifty years ago, both South Korea and Finland had terrible education systems. Finland was at risk of becoming the economic stepchild of Europe. South Korea was ravaged by civil war. Yet over the past half century, both South Korea and Finland have turned their schools around — and now both countries are hailed internationally for their extremely high educational outcomes. What can other countries learn from these two successful, but diametrically opposed, educational models? The Korean model: Grit and hard, hard, hard work. For millennia, in some parts of Asia, the only way to climb the socioeconomic ladder and find secure work was to take an examination — in which the proctor was a proxy for the emperor, says Marc Tucker, president and CEO of the National Center on Education and the Economy. The Koreans have achieved a remarkable feat: the country is 100 percent literate. “A key to that is education. Indeed.

http://ideas.ted.com/2014/09/04/what-the-best-education-systems-are-doing-right/

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