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Using Webb's Depth of Knowledge to Increase Rigor

Using Webb's Depth of Knowledge to Increase Rigor
The word "rigor" is hard to avoid today, and it provokes strong reactions from educators. Policymakers tout its importance. Publishers promote it as a feature of their materials. But some teachers share the view of Joanne Yatvin, past president of the National Council for Teachers of English. To them, rigor simply means more work, harder books, and longer school days. "None of these things is what I want for students at any level," Yatvin says. Calculating Cognitive Depth For classroom teachers, the more important question is one of practice: how do we create rich environments where all students learn at a high level? Level 1: Recall and Reproduction Tasks at this level require recall of facts or rote application of simple procedures. Level 2: Skills and Concepts At this level, a student must make some decisions about his or her approach. Level 3: Strategic Thinking At this level of complexity, students must use planning and evidence, and thinking is more abstract. Apply as Needed

http://www.edutopia.org/blog/webbs-depth-knowledge-increase-rigor-gerald-aungst

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The Power of "I Don't Know" The role of teaching has evolved. No longer are we the carriers of knowledge, giving it to students and assessing if they can repeat facts successfully. We are, instead, tasked with teaching students how to find answers themselves. And it all starts with a simple three-word phrase: I don't know. Adopting a comfortable "I don't know" attitude is far more accurate for what we need to do as educators then pretending we know it all. It sounds counterintuitive, I know. Overloaded with information, students need critical thinking skills Students today have unprecedented access to information. According to educator Karl Fisch, in one week of reading The New York Times, an individual will encounter more information than people in the 18th century would have had access to during the entire course of their lives. Forbes magazine has estimated the total number of pages indexed on Google to be more than one trillion. While this deluge of often-conflicting information should make students less certain of what they believe, it appears to be having the opposite effect. It is not surprising that in this atmosphere, students appear to be growing increasingly dogmatic and are less able to engage in civil discourse with others with whom they disagree.

Argument map Argument maps are commonly used in the context of teaching and applying critical thinking.[2] The purpose of mapping is to uncover the logical structure of arguments, identify unstated assumptions, evaluate the support an argument offers for a conclusion, and aid understanding of debates. Argument maps are often designed to support deliberation of issues, ideas and arguments in wicked problems.[3] An argument map is not to be confused with a concept map or a mind map, which are less strict in relating claims. Objectives Why do people leave them till last? Objectives are a starting point. You start projects with objectives, you start a journey with a destination (objective!)

The Impact Of Situated Cognition In eLearning Gathering knowledge is one thing, but being able to apply it in the real world is another. The primary objective of any eLearning course is to give learners the skills and information they need to achieve personal and professional goals. This is why situated cognition is a perfect fit in eLearning strategies. In this article, I will discuss the impact situated cognition has upon online education. While a variety of Instructional Design approaches may prepare learners for the real world by instilling knowledge, situated cognition throws them into the thick of things, so to speak, right from the start.

Report Finds ‘Deeper Learning’ Model Improves Outcomes for All Students The conversation about what kids need to know and to be able to do by the end of high school has gradually shifted over the past several years to emphasize not just rigorous content goals, but also less tangible skills, such as creative thinking, problem-solving and collaboration. That shift has brought schools that are practicing “deeper learning” into focus. The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation has been a big supporter of this work, defining deeper learning as a model that focuses on critical thinking, communication, collaboration, academic mindsets and learning how to learn, all through rigorous content. New research conducted by the American Institutes for Research (AIR) has found that the deeper learning model does have positive learning outcomes for students, regardless of their background.

Critical Thinking Pathways Critical thinking is trendy these days. With 6.3 million hits resulting from a Google search -- six times "Bloom's Taxonomy" -- its importance is undeniable. Worldwide, critical thinking (CT) is integrated into finger-painting lessons, units on Swiss immigrants, discussions of Cinderella, and the Common Core State Standards. Ten Takeaway Tips for Teaching Critical Thinking Suggestions from educators at KIPP King Collegiate High School on how to help develop and assess critical-thinking skills in your students. Ideally, teaching kids how to think critically becomes an integral part of your approach, no matter what subject you teach. But if you're just getting started, here are some concrete ways you can begin leveraging your students' critical-thinking skills in the classroom and beyond. 1. Questions, questions, questions. Questioning is at the heart of critical thinking, so you want to create an environment where intellectual curiosity is fostered and questions are encouraged.

Why is ‘challenge’ such a challenge? ‘Challenge’ is one of those buzz-words being bandied about in education at the moment. You must challenge your students! Students in the UK are institutionally under-challenged! The new curriculum is designed to create rigour and challenge!

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