background preloader

Céline Alvarez, une institutrice révolutionnaire

Céline Alvarez, une institutrice révolutionnaire

http://www.lemonde.fr/festival/article/2014/09/04/celine-alvarez-une-instit-revolutionnaire_4481540_4415198.html

Related:  BrainInsideParentingInnovations pédagogiquesEducationPolitique divers

40 maps that explain the world Maps can be a remarkably powerful tool for understanding the world and how it works, but they show only what you ask them to. So when we saw a post sweeping the Web titled "40 maps they didn't teach you in school," one of which happens to be a WorldViews original, I thought we might be able to contribute our own collection. Some of these are pretty nerdy, but I think they're no less fascinating and easily understandable. Beco Baby Carrier We got it wrong. It was brought to our attention that we hurt some of our babywearing family. For that we are sorry, and we are extremely committed to making things right. We recognize that our 'Woodland Trail' Beco Toddler Carrier textile repeat, and 'Teepee' Beco Baby Carrier print name are culturally insensitive and serve to appropriate Native American culture.

The 13 most innovative schools in the world Mathias Eis Schultz Ørestad Gymnasium is one giant classroom, where more than 1,100 high school students spend half their time learning in an expansive glass cube — a "gymnasium," as parts of Europe still call secondary schools — to avoid traditional instruction. By encouraging students to collaborate in wide-open settings, the school hopes kids will be equipped to think flexibly on diverse topics later in life. "We want to have teaching where the students make research and work together in solving real problems," headmaster Allan Kjær Andersen tells Tech Insider. "So we want to be an open school that is in connection with the outside world." The open spaces, which are adorned with equally spacious "drums" for a more relaxed learning environment, encourage students to assume an active role in their own education.

Re-imagining education: from Gandhi’s grandson to a school without classrooms A few months ago, on a remote island off the coast of Stockholm, I met another Change Leader who has truly re-imagined learning for the 21st century. Following a tragic case of vandalism in which his school burnt down to the ground, principal Lennart Nilsson asked his local community what they wanted their new school to look like. Parents, policy makers, teachers and pupils collectively decided on a new kind of learning environment – rooted in the ‘real world’ and based on the natural ways children learn. Pupils work in mixed-aged teams of around 75 children and have sub-teams within that group. Instead of following lessons in classrooms, they create projects in flexible, open spaces.

The role of Islam in radicalisation is grossly overestimated For at least a decade the issue of young Muslims becoming radicalised towards violent extremism has been one of concern for academics and practitioners like me. While we work on a daily basis to find ways to prevent radicalisation or intervene in the radicalisation process, occasionally the issue grabs the attention of the international media: usually in the aftermath of attacks such as the Boston marathon bombings and last week’s shootings at the offices of Charlie Hebdo magazine and a kosher supermarket in Paris. Global events like these shine a spotlight on Muslim communities who are placed in the unwanted position of having to defend their religion. Calls for Muslims to be accountable, take responsibility, condemn, object, speak out, reject and prove that they do not condone criminal acts of violence often mask a more unnerving suggestion that Islam itself is to blame. The fact is that the role of religion in radicalisation (and deradicalisation) is grossly overestimated.

A Famous Steve Jobs Speech Is Hidden on Your Mac Every Mac which has the Pages app for OS X installed includes a little Easter Egg that few know about; a famous Steve Jobs speech, tucked away in a little unassuming folder. Technically, it’s two different Steve Jobs speeches, the famous text from the Crazy Ones Think Different campaign, and arguably the even more famous 2005 Steve Jobs commencement speech from Stanford University. Note that you must have Pages.app installed in OS X to find the Easter Egg file, Pages is free as part of the iWork suite nowadays on new Macs, and older versions can upgrade to the latest versions for free. The file exists in the newest version of Pages and presumably older versions as well. Selecting the file and hitting spacebar will show the full Easter Egg in Quick Look: There may be a way to access the speech somewhere from the Pages app without launching it directly or accessing it through the apps Resources folder, if you know of one let us know in the comments.

Forget Vaccines: If You're Really Concerned About Autism, Become An Environmentalist by Emily Atkin Posted on Share this: Scaling Impact in Education It has been an unprecedented time for education entrepreneurs, with the federal government increasing funding available to innovative nonprofits, engaging social innovators in the development of policy, and highlighting the work of entrepreneurs as exemplars to be followed. In this panel discussion at the NewSchools Summit 2010 conference, Bridgespan Group partner Susan Colby discusses the state of education reform. Education entrepreneurs follow by sharing how innovative ideas, models, and policies may be focused and scaled so that more children can get the education they deserve.

The Hawn Foundation I love MindUP! It is a way to focus your mind, calm down and reflect on a situation when you need to make a choice. - Tyler G., Seventh Grade Student MindUP™ teaches social and emotional learning skills that link cognitive neuroscience, positive psychology and mindful awareness training utilizing a brain centric approach.

Related:  Web TiviA liresamuelschiro