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A Project-Based Learning Cheat Sheet For Authentic Learning

A Project-Based Learning Cheat Sheet For Authentic Learning
A Project-Based Learning Cheat Sheet by TeachThought Staff Like most buzzwords in education, “authenticity” isn’t a new idea. For decades, teachers have sought to make student learning “authentic” by looking to the “real world”–the challenges, technology, and communities that students care about and connect with daily. You’ve probably been encouraged in the past to design work that “leaves the classroom.” Reach beyond the school walls. We’re going to take a closer look at progressive approaches to teacher planning whenever Terry Heick can be convinced to finish that series. The function of this image is to act as a kind of brainstorm–to help you get your own creative juices going to decide what’s most important when designing an authentic project-based learning unit–audiences, technology, habits, purposes, and so on. You obviously don’t even have to use these categories; they are just a sampling of the kinds of thinking that can help you make the shift from academic to authentic learning.

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Preparing Students for a Project-Based World Authored by Bonnie Lathram, Bob Lenz and Tom Vander Ark Download the PublicationDownload the Student Quick Start Guide In the paper, Preparing Students for a Project-Based World, released jointly by Getting Smart and Buck Institute for Education (BIE), we explore equity, economic realities, student engagement and instructional and school design in the preparation of all students for college, career and citizenship. 20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers 20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers by Miriam Clifford This post has been updated from a 2011 post. There is an age old adage that says “two heads are better than one”.

12 Timeless Project-Based Learning Resources 12 Timeless Project-Based Learning Resources by Shannon Dauphin Project-based learning is becoming increasingly popular as teachers look for a way to make lessons stick in the minds of their students. According to Edutopia, studies have shown that students who use project-based learning remember the material much longer and have healthier attitudes toward education. Project-based learning is based on the idea that students learn best by tackling and solving real world problems. Students are much more engaged with the subject matter and look to the teacher as more of a coach who guides them through their own reflections and ideas.

Integrated PBL Projects: A Full-Course Meal! In the project-based learning field, we use the metaphor that projects are the "main course, not the dessert" (as coined in an article from the Buck Institute for Education). Projects are intended to create the need-to-know content and skills, and the opportunity for students to learn them in an authentic context. When teachers first design PBL projects, they are often limited. Five Ways to Ensure Real Learning Happens in Maker-Enhanced Projects While not new, project-based learning has become a popular method to try and move beyond surface-level learning. Many teachers are trying to figure out the right ingredients for strong projects that interest and engage students, while helping them meet required learning targets. But implementing project-based learning well isn’t easy, especially when many teachers are more accustomed to direct instruction, when they can be sure they’ve at least touched on all the topics in the curriculum. On top of the push toward projects, some educators are also embracing maker-education, a distinct but often overlapping idea. “There’s a lot of research out there about integrating making into project-based learning to ramp up what students are learning in the core content areas that they’re going to be tested in,” said Michael Stone, an Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow, who taught high school in Tennessee. Before the STEM school, Stone was skeptical of project-based learning.

8 Needs For Project-Based Learning In The 21st Century 8 Needs For Project-Based Learning In The 21st Century by Terry Heick We recently offered a definition of project-based learning, and looked at keys to designing Project-Based Learning. We also have looked at the difference between “doing projects” and project-based learning, various project-based learning resources, project-based learning apps, and offered ways for using an iPad in Project-Based Learning. And have shared some practical ideas for better teaching through project-based learning as well. What might be missing from these posts, however, are simply the characteristics of project-based learning in the 21st century.

8 Steps To Design Problem-Based Learning In Your Classroom What Is Problem-Based Learning? by TeachThought Staff What is problem-based learning? One definition, if we want to start simple, is learning that is based around a problem. 100 Incredibly Useful YouTube Channels for Teachers YouTube has earned a reputation for featuring brain cell-slaughtering fare such as the truly abysmal Fred and playing host to the some of the most depressingly stupid comments this side of Yahoo! News. But for every participant liberally dishing out misspelled racist, sexist and homophobic talking points, there is at least one whose channel genuinely offers something provocative and educational. For teachers hoping to infuse multimedia into their classrooms, YouTube makes for an excellent starting point. Plenty of universities, nonprofits, organizations, museums and more post videos for the cause of education both in and out of schools. The following list compiles some of the ones most worthy of attention, as they feature plenty of solid content appealing to their respective audiences and actively try to make viewers smarter.

13 Tips for Students Getting Started with Project-Based Learning On a recent visit to speak to college students at the University of Washington, I asked how many of the students were regularly engaged in project-based learning at the university level. I was surprised that only a few students raised their hands. As we have been exploring in our series about project-based learning, it is a project-based world. The reality is, my kids (and yours) and your students are heading into a new economy and a vast technological change. Robots may be taking over routine tasks, and more young people will rely on freelance work or gigs to make a living. Those that do work in large organizations will collaborate digitally, tackle complex problems and do the bulk of their work on teams and in projects.

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