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297 Flabby Words and Phrases That Rob Your Writing of All Its Power

297 Flabby Words and Phrases That Rob Your Writing of All Its Power
You’re not stupid. You know what writing is truly about. It’s a never-ending battle for your readers’ attention. Every sentence is a link in a taut chain that connects your headline to your conclusion. And you are just one weak sentence away from losing your reader forever. So you take your craft quite seriously. You ignore all but your best ideas. You work on each piece of writing for exactly as long as necessary to get it right. And you edit until your words are crisp and clear. But what if that isn’t enough? What if weaknesses remain that are almost impossible to spot? The Subtle Attention Killers That Hide in Plain Sight No matter how carefully you scrutinize your writing, subtle problems will remain. Certain words and phrases are so commonplace – and so seemingly benign – that they glide unnoticed under your editing radar. But these words and phrases can silently erode your reader’s attention. They don’t stand out. But they weaken your writing and dilute your ideas. So bookmark this post.

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100 Exquisite Adjectives By Mark Nichol Adjectives — descriptive words that modify nouns — often come under fire for their cluttering quality, but often it’s quality, not quantity, that is the issue. Plenty of tired adjectives are available to spoil a good sentence, but when you find just the right word for the job, enrichment ensues. Practice precision when you select words. Here’s a list of adjectives: Subscribe to Receive our Articles and Exercises via Email Monomyth Joseph Campbell's monomyth, or the hero's journey, is a basic pattern that its proponents argue is found in many narratives from around the world. This widely distributed pattern was described by Campbell in The Hero with a Thousand Faces (1949).[1] Campbell, an enthusiast of novelist James Joyce, borrowed the term monomyth from Joyce's Finnegans Wake.[2] Campbell held that numerous myths from disparate times and regions share fundamental structures and stages, which he summarized in The Hero with a Thousand Faces:

The 10 Types of Writers’ Block (and How to Overcome Them) #4 was a really common event in my undergrad screenwriting classes (where it was commonly called the Page 70 Problem or the Act 2 Dead Zone or some other ridiculous name). It is really where outlining-as-you-go can prevent problems. For instance, I might have a ten point outline for the whole story and as I catch up to various points I may go back over the outline and flesh out points with another outline. Color Words Colour Terms This list contains 168 definitions of obscure colour terms using combinations of 'normal' colours of the rainbow and descriptive adjectives; e.g. cardinal = deep scarlet red; russet = reddish brown. Note that most English speakers outside the U.S. spell colour with the added British 'u' rather than the American version color. Don't worry if the colours (or colors) in your universe don't match up with the definitions I've given for these words, though - I've been known to have skewed perceptions of reality ...

Dos and Don'ts For Fantasy/Sci-Fi Writers Dos and Don'ts For Fantasy/Sci-Fi Writers Fantasy Specific Writing good, well thought-out fantasy can be a challenging process, especially when featuring a setting or race completely different from that which is familiar to the author. There are a myriad of places within a story where a writer can falter and insert details which are not well enough developed, uncharacteristic, confusing, or which simply don't make sense in the context of the setting. This list is meant to point out some of these common areas of confusion and tell what can be done to be more aware of and correct any potential inconsistencies. Remember that these are all only suggestions, and not everything on the list applies to every story.

The Little Things (Can Make a Character Great): Specifics and the Directive EVERYTHING is supported, illuminated and deepened by your “SPECIFICS”–your “SPECIFIC CHOICES” in a scene. What EXACTLY do you fall in love with? Her eyes? The way he walks? His powerful shoulders? Her smell? 45 ways to avoid using the word 'very' A posthaven user upvoted this post. — habebaakiar 3 years ago — barcahaters 3 years ago The Semi-Grand List of Overused Romance Clichés Characterization, or lack thereof 1. The heroine is stunningly beautiful. It’s one thing for the hero to glance at her legs, or imagine running his fingers through her long hair. It’s quite another if he (or worse, she) rhapsodizes about her “blackberry brandy tresses”? or “the small, perfect dimple in her cheek”?

Writer Creates “Color Thesaurus” To Help You Correctly Name Any Color Imaginable Ingrid Sundberg, a writer and children’s book illustrator, created a very useful infographic chart for anyone struggling with color names. The writer says that she loves to collect words that can help give her stories variety and depth. “I’ve learned that we all have different associations with color words,” Sundberg told Bored Panda. “For example the color sapphire is a light blue to me (since that’s the color of the sapphire on my engagement ring), but a sapphire can also be a very dark blue. 8 ½ Character Archetypes You Should Be Writing Here’s the thing about character archetypes: everybody’s got his own take. Do you run with Joseph Campbell’s gazillion and one Jungian archetypes? How about Dramatica’s double quad of eight archetypes? Or maybe screenwriter Michael Hauge’s simple offering of four main players? Nothing wrong with running with all of them.

Synonyms for words commonly used in student's writing Amazing- incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary Anger- enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden Angry- mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed Answer- reply, respond, retort, acknowledge Lester Dent Pulp Paper Master Fiction Plot This is a formula, a master plot, for any 6000 word pulp story. It has worked on adventure, detective, western and war-air. It tells exactly where to put everything.

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