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Reflective Teaching Questions: A Challenge For Teachers

Reflective Teaching Questions: A Challenge For Teachers
Reflective Teaching Questions: A 30-Day Blogging Challenge For Teachers by TeachThought Staff We’ve talked about “reflective teaching” before, and shared ways to be a more reflective teacher as well. Well, September is Reflective Teacher month at TeachThought, and in celebration some folks from our facebook team have created a blogging challenge for you to take, share with your colleagues, and use as reflective tools for growth. So, beginning September 1st, you’re on the clock. Make it a point to blog every day for 30 days, even if there are days you can only muster a paragraph. Details Blog for the 30 days of September, 2014, using the prompts below.We’ll share a handful of posts per day, but we can’t share them if you don’t send them to us–@teachthought! Day 1 Write your goals for the school year. Day 2 Write about one piece of technology that you would like to try this year, and why. Day 3 Discuss one “observation” area that you would like to improve on for your teacher evaluation. Day 4 Day 5

http://www.teachthought.com/teaching/reflective-teaching-30-day-blogging-challenge-teachers/

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30 Habits Of Highly Effective Teachers Editor’s Note: We often look at the qualities and characteristics of good teaching and learning, including the recent following pieces: How A Good Teacher Becomes Great What You Owe Your Students Ten Secrets To Surviving As A Teacher Watch What's Working: Carol Dweck Talks Growth Mindset What about the kids that don't "get" school? What about the kid who doesn't see the point or the purpose of sitting in a desk and doing assignments that have never motivated her in the past? Or the kid who is always assigned tasks that perpetuate the notion that he is simply "not that smart?" What makes great teaching? – expert views Popular teaching methods, such as lavishing praise on pupils and grouping students by ability, are not based on evidence and can harm student development, a report has found. The Sutton Trust examined 200 pieces of research on what makes great teaching, concluding that some common practices have no grounding in research while other less popular approaches can be effective. The report found that the two most important elements of great teaching were the quality of instruction and how well a teacher knew their subject. Different methods for evaluating teaching were also examined, including lesson observations and getting students to rate their teachers.

15 Mistakes New Teachers Make (and what I learned making them) I’ve had the pleasure of working with a lot of new teachers the past three years, and I’ve seen many of the same mistakes I made during my first year teaching repeated over and over. Now, this isn’t to say that I thought teaching was extremely difficult during my first year (I actually loved it and was not too overwhelmed)…but I did have my fair share of “rookie” mistakes. I’ve learned that the best way I can help out new teachers is by sharing my story, and what teaching was like for me that first year. The best part of making mistakes is learning from them…so even if you make some of the mistakes listed below, it’s all part of the process! 1.

Developing a Growth Mindset in Teachers and Staff An idea that is beginning to gain a lot of favour in educational circles at the moment is the notion of fixed versus growth mindsets, and how they might relate to students and learning. Based on the work of Stanford University psychologist, Carol Dweck, the idea of mindset is related to our understanding of where ability comes from. It has recently been seized upon by educators as a tool to explore our knowledge of student achievement, and ways that such achievement might be improved. However, in my work, I have found that the notion of developing a growth mindset is as equally applicable to staff and teacher performance as it is to students. This article begins with a brief discussion about the difference between the two mindsets, what that means for education, and concludes with some ideas for how school leaders might seek to develop a growth mindset amongst their staff. According to Dweck:

What Teachers Want To Hear Students Say What Teachers Want To Hear: 12 Examples by Terry Heick “Ohhh, now I get it.” The iconic phrase that teachers value hearing. Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: The 33 Digital Skills Every 21st Century Teacher should Have By EdTech Team Updated on march 2, 2015 : The original list that was created in 2011 comprised 33 skills , after reviewing it we decided to do some merging and finally ended up with the 20 skills below. The 21st century teacher should be able to : Learning & Play: Ten ways to interact with children in play   Originally posted at teachingparadox.com As I prepare to re-enter the classroom next year, I have been reading up on all things PLAY. We will be diving head first into a play based curriculum that is clearly defined and structured. It is exciting/inspiring.

What Makes Teachers Great, From The Perspective of a 10th Grader This article was written by Noa Gutow-Ellis, a high school sophomore in Houston, Texas. She’s passionate about all things related to the Arab Spring and 21st Century Education. As an 8th grader, Noa gave a TEDx talk about the power of social media. Everyone can think back to their years as a student and recall at least one teacher that stood out as a truly outstanding teacher. We’ve all had that teacher at some point in our lives. Professional learning: From engagement to impact ‘Every teacher needs to improve, not because they are not good enough, but because they can be even better,’ - Professor Dylan Wiliam, 2012 SSAT National Conference. There is a growing appreciation and commitment to self-improvement among the teaching profession, yet the practical connection between professional learning outcomes and changed practice continues to be elusive. Links between teacher professional learning and improved student outcomes also need to be strengthened. In this article, we consider recent international data and the potential implications for Australian educators.

8 Characteristics Of A Great Teacher 8 Characteristics Of A Great Teacher by Ian Lancaster What makes a teacher strong? A (massive) collaborative curriculum review… How (and why?!) would we involve over a hundred teachers in a curriculum review? What could we hope to achieve? Wouldn’t it be easier to have a small focus group reviewing our PYP program of inquiry? How could we make this IB requirement into a meaningful learning exercise?

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