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Jasper Fforde.com : Grand Central

Jasper Fforde.com : Grand Central

http://www.jasperfforde.com/

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Raymond Carver Raymond Clevie Carver, Jr. (May 25, 1938 – August 2, 1988) was an American short story writer and poet. Carver was a major writer of the late 20th century and a major force in the revitalization of the American short story in literature in the 1980s. The 12 Greatest Apocalyptic Novels Of All Time After scouring book reviews and Wikipedia, a list of the Top 12 Best Apocalyptic Novels was born. The books on this list take you down the darkest paths in uncivilized worlds, from cannibalistic gangs to vampire infected corpses. If this list doesn't get you thinking on the quickest way stock your basement full of water, canned goods and rifles, I don't know what will! Enjoy!

Susan Sontag: Notes On "Camp" Published in 1964. Many things in the world have not been named; and many things, even if they have been named, have never been described. One of these is the sensibility -- unmistakably modern, a variant of sophistication but hardly identical with it -- that goes by the cult name of "Camp." A sensibility (as distinct from an idea) is one of the hardest things to talk about; but there are special reasons why Camp, in particular, has never been discussed. It is not a natural mode of sensibility, if there be any such. Indeed the essence of Camp is its love of the unnatural: of artifice and exaggeration.

Writing Advice Well, first off, boring writing covers a multitude of sins. Without looking at your writing (which I can’t do), I can’t tell you why it’s boring exactly, any more than if you call up a doctor and tell her you don’t feel well, she can tell you what’s wrong with you exactly. The differential, so to speak, is vast. This is why you need someone — a teacher, friends, ideally a class of writing students — reading your work and giving you feedback. If you are convinced that your writing is boring, ask yourself a few questions:

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley : chapter one Chapter One A SQUAT grey building of only thirty-four stories. Over the main entrance the words, CENTRAL LONDON HATCHERY AND CONDITIONING CENTRE, and, in a shield, the World State's motto, COMMUNITY, IDENTITY, STABILITY.

The Mystery of Charles Dickens by Joyce Carol Oates Charles Dickens: A Life by Claire Tomalin Penguin, 527 pp., $36.00 Charles Dickens: A Life (Waterstone’s Special Edition) by Claire Tomalin, with an appendix of selected letters by Dickens London: Viking, 542 pp., £30.00 J.K. Rowling, Lexicon and Oz Alert! Due to the popularity of this article, we have moved it to a static HTML format. After reading this article, if you would like to visit our Web site, greensboro.rhinotimes.com, Click here. Uncle Orson Reviews EverythingJ.K. 130, Italo Calvino Upon hearing of Italo Calvino’s death in September of 1985, John Updike commented, “Calvino was a genial as well as brilliant writer. He took fiction into new places where it had never been before, and back into the fabulous and ancient sources of narrative.” At that time Calvino was the preeminent Italian writer, the influence of his fantastic novels and stories reaching far beyond the Mediterranean.

Please Don’t Promise Me Forever Imagine this: It’s 1976 and you’re dating a man named Rick. He has a mustache and owns at least one reindeer sweater. High off of reading The Easter Parade and The Great Santini, he’s all pumped up to write the next great American novel but, to make ends meet, he’s currently working for Hallmark. He’s been really cagey about his latest project, only revealing that this will be the first time Hermann Zapf‘s Crown font is used in a publication. Kurt Vonnegut on Reading, Boredom, Belonging, and Hate by Maria Popova “Hate, in the long run, is about as nourishing as cyanide.” What makes the commencement address such a singular pinnacle of the communication arts is that, in an era where religion is increasingly being displaced by culture and secular thought, it offers a secular version of the sermon — a packet of guidance on how to be a good human being and lead a good life. It is also one of the few cultural contexts in which a patronizing attitude, in the original sense of the term, is not only acceptable but desired — after all, the very notion of the graduation speech calls for a patronly father figure or matronly mother figure to get up at the podium and impart to young people hard-earned, experience-tested wisdom on how to live well.

Jabberwocky "Beware the Jabberwock, my son! The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! Beware the Jubjub bird, and shun The frumious Bandersnatch!" He took his vorpal sword in hand: Long time the manxome foe he sought -- So rested he by the Tumtum tree, And stood awhile in thought. And, as in uffish thought he stood, The Jabberwock, with eyes of flame, Came whiffling through the tulgey wood, And burbled as it came! One, two! Writers Who Published Great Books Before Age 25 Picture it: teenage Mary Shelley was on a vacation getaway, with her husband Percy and some of his rambunctious poet friends, like that rogue Lord Byron… and out of the group of legends, it’s Shelley herself who arguably published the greatest work of all at the ridiculous age of 20: Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus, a book that has penetrated our human consciousness. In honor of Shelley’s birthday this month, here’s a list of 25 other writers who created heartbreakingly beautiful work before they could get a discount on a rental car or have their publishers demand an active Twitter account. If you’re 26, get on out of here. (However, interestingly enough, 26 seems to be a magic age for a lot of writers, starting with Thomas Pynchon, which is a whole other list.)

Bruce Kasanoff: My Two-Month Crash Course on SlideShare Author and entrepreneur Bruce Kasanoff dove head-first into SlideShare: With barely any previous experience on the site, he uploaded 13 presentations in two months. He did something right — five of his presentations were the most-viewed SlideShares of the week, and he’s gotten a total of more than 270,000 views. The Now Possible managing director and LinkedIn Influencer shares the lessons he learned along the way: Although I’d previously published a few pieces on Slideshare, it wasn’t until two months ago I got serious about sharing my ideas here. Here’s what I’ve learned so far: From The Hundred Acre Wood To Midtown To see one of the most important exhibits at the New York Public Library, skip the main entrance… …and take the far-less trafficked 42nd Street door: Once past the metal detector, hang a right down the first corridor… …and continue on into the Children’s Center. See that wooden partition in the center of the center of the room?

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