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How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/08/how-does-the-brain-learn-best-smart-studying-strategies/

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Preparing Your Students for the Challenges of Tomorrow Right now, you have students. Eventually, those students will become the citizens -- employers, employees, professionals, educators, and caretakers of our planet in 21st century. Beyond mastery of standards, what can you do to help prepare them? 20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers 20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers by Miriam Clifford This post has been updated from a 2011 post. There is an age old adage that says “two heads are better than one”. Consider collaboration in recent history: Watson and Crick or Page and Brin (Founders of Google). Don’t Go Back to School: How to Fuel the Internal Engine of Learning by Maria Popova “When you step away from the prepackaged structure of traditional education, you’ll discover that there are many more ways to learn outside school than within.” “The present education system is the trampling of the herd,” legendary architect Frank Lloyd Wright lamented in 1956. Half a century later, I started Brain Pickings in large part out of frustration and disappointment with my trampling experience of our culturally fetishized “Ivy League education.” I found myself intellectually and creatively unstimulated by the industrialized model of the large lecture hall, the PowerPoint presentations, the standardized tests assessing my rote memorization of facts rather than my ability to transmute that factual knowledge into a pattern-recognition mechanism that connects different disciplines to cultivate wisdom about how the world works and a moral lens on how it should work.

Readers absorb less on Kindles than on paper, study finds A new study which found that readers using a Kindle were "significantly" worse than paperback readers at recalling when events occurred in a mystery story is part of major new Europe-wide research looking at the impact of digitisation on the reading experience. The study, presented in Italy at a conference last month and set to be published as a paper, gave 50 readers the same short story by Elizabeth George to read. Half read the 28-page story on a Kindle, and half in a paperback, with readers then tested on aspects of the story including objects, characters and settings.

Engaging Brains: How to Enhance Learning by Teaching Kids About Neuroplasticity Editor's note: This post is co-authored by Marcus Conyers who, with Donna Wilson, is co-developer of the M.S. and Ed.S. Brain-Based Teaching degree programs at Nova Southeastern University. They have written several books, including Five Big Ideas for Effective Teaching: Connecting Mind, Brain, and Education Research to Classroom Practice. Enhancing Student Commitment Explicitly teaching students about neuroplasticity can have a transformative impact in the classroom. A central facet of our work as teacher educators is teaching about how the brain changes during learning.

Defining Collaborative Teaching If only Teacher A and Teacher B could check their calendars and begin scheduling weekly meetings they could create a true collaborative relationship. Together, they would begin to construct fully structured bridges between their curriculums that would not only bring them deep professional satisfaction, more importantly; they would enrich the learning experiences of their students. Try to picture the collaborative environment Teacher A and Teacher B could produce.

The complete guide to taking notes effectively at work - Quartz Often, you’ll hear people say that you should “trust your instincts” when making decisions. But are first instincts always the best? Psychological research has shown many times that no, they are often no better—and in many cases worse—than a revision or change. Despite enormous popular belief that first instincts are special, dozens of experiments have found that they are not. While that may be a useful fact to bring up in an academic discussion, anyone who has ever made a decision in real life will undoubtedly reply: But I remember times when I made a correct choice, then changed my mind and was wrong. Why Physical Education is Important for Academic Skills Wait, you might not want to cut P. E. from the school curriculum just yet! A new study by researchers at the University of Illinois found that twenty minutes of brisk walking or jogging on treadmills helped children with ADHD become better students. The researchers recruited 40 8-to-10-year-old boys and girls, half of whom had ADHD. All the kids took a series of computerized academic and attentional tests.

Music Lessons Enhance Brain Function in Disadvantaged Kids Children from poor neighborhoods in Los Angeles who took regular music lessons for two years were able to distinguish similar speech sounds faster than their peers. There is much evidence that poverty, and the chronic stress it creates, hinders the development of young brains. However, new research finds one important aspect of neural functioning is gradually strengthened when underprivileged children engage in a challenging but fun activity: Music lessons. A newly published study of six- to nine-year-olds living in gang-infested areas of Los Angeles finds those who spent two years participating in a free music-instruction program processed the sound of certain syllables more rapidly than their peers with less musical training. “This research demonstrates that community music programs can literally remodel children’s brains in a way that improves sound processing, which could lead to better learning and language skills.”

Why Inquiry Learning is Worth the Trouble Visualization of SLA principal Chris Lehmann's 2011 talk: guiding kids' to thinking about how they think. Nearly seven years after first opening its doors, the Science Leadership Academy public magnet high school* in Philadelphia and its inquiry-based approach to learning have become a national model for the kinds of reforms educators strive towards. But in a talk this past weekend at EduCon 2.5, the school’s sixth-annual conference devoted to sharing its story and spreading its techniques, Founding Principal Chris Lehmann insisted that replicating his schools approach required difficult tradeoffs. “This is not easy. This is not perfect,” Lehmann told a crowd of devotees stuffed inside one of the Center City school’s second-floor science classrooms on Sunday. “There are really challenging pieces of this, and we should be OK with this.”

5 Steps to a Clearer Mind d13/Shutterstock Have you ever tried working on a project only to find thoughts from all the other areas of your life intruding in your mind, making it difficult to concentrate on the task at hand? This kind of distracted state can be debilitating. It might be a sign that you have ADD and could benefit from any of a number of treatment options or coping strategies. It might be a sign of other problems as well. But there’s a very good chance that you’ve simply acquired too many open loops in your mind, and you can get long-lasting relief within the hour.

10 tips for getting started with Google Classroom Education Published One of the biggest innovations in education happened just about a week ago. It wasn’t a new iPad or a new iteration of the Common Core. Sorry to burst your bubble. No, it was the announcement of a new way to make your Google-based classroom a lot more cohesive.

Author Benedict Carey highlights the key messages from his book and offers a handful of study strategies. by dt4lt Aug 28

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