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Prezi - Presentation Software

Prezi - Presentation Software

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Hot Potatoes Home Page News - 12/06/2013 Dr. Stan Bogdanov has published Hacking Hot Potatoes: The Cookbook, available in paperback, PDF and ePub format. Check it out!A change to the user agent string in Firefox 17 results in Hot Potatoes and Quandary exercises showing an error message when loading in the browser. Improving student assessment The issue Effective assessment has greater bearing on successful learning than almost any other factor. Increasing student numbers are adding to marking workloads for staff and students express more dissatisfaction with assessment and feedback than with any other aspect of their learning experience, according to the National Student Survey (2011).

eXe The eXe project developed a freely available Open Source authoring application to assist teachers and academics in the publishing of web content without the need to become proficient in HTML or XML markup. Resources authored in eXe can be exported in IMS Content Package, SCORM 1.2, or IMS Common Cartridge formats or as simple self-contained web pages. eXe grew out of the New Zealand Government Tertiary Education Commission's eCollaboration Fund and was led by the University of Auckland, The Auckland University of Technology, and Tairawhiti Polytechnic. It was later supported by CORE Education, a New Zealand-based not-for-profit educational research and development organisation. It has also been greatly assisted by a global group of participants and contributors.

Case studies in social bookmarking - Empowering learners with social bookmarking Introducing social bookmarking with students Anne talks about the process for her and students to work out what new tools can provide and then how they can enrich the learning experience. Allowing ‘set up’ time initially to help students to familiarise with the tools is an important part of this process. <object type="application/x-shockwave-flash" data="applets/audio.swf?file=applets/abartlett_t1.mp3" width="270" height="46"><param name="movie" value="applets/audio.swf?file=applets/abartlett_t1.mp3"><param name="quality" value="high"><p>You do not have the Flash plugin. 101 Web 2.0 Teaching Tools Online tools and resources have made it easier for teachers to instruct students, and for students to collaborate with those teachers and with other students and parents. These “Web 2.0” teaching tools aren’t magical, but they may seem to defy definition at times since they save time, help you to stay organized, and often take up little space on a computer. Some of these applications are Web-based, which means that they can be accessed from any computer. The following list is filled with tools that will make a teacher’s, or those enrolled in the best online education programs, life easier. The categories are listed in alphabetical order and the links to each tool are also listed alphabetically within those categories.

Taking the Learners and Technology Outdoors I began my career as an educator as an outdoor educator. Now I teach educational technology. Given both the ever increasing sedentary and indoor lives of kids and the advancement of technology, the time is ripe to combine the two. Teaching Using Google Glass and Apps Creating a platform to enable the fluid and continuous exchange of ideas and information. Can the use of devices such as Glass add pedagogical value (Video 1)? As a wearable computer, the Glass screen can be used to provide an educator with key or supplemental information during a talk, lecture, or discussion. It is also being used by instructors to demonstrate specific skills, interview experts, and allow students to view distant sites (such as CERN in Switzerland – a feature temporarily suspended due to poor user experience). Examples of these uses and more can be found on forums such as Google Glass in Education.

Studies of e-portfolio implementation (videos and toolkit) Two online resources providing guidance on large-scale implementation of e-portfolio tools in UK further and higher education are available to supplement the 2008 JISC publication, Effective Practice with e-Portfolios The online resources, five video case-studies and an online toolkit for managers and practitioners, explore the issues, challenges and benefits of scaling up e-portfolio use across a university or college, and offer opportunities to explore the pros and cons of different approaches and methodologies. The e-Portfolio Implementation Toolkit The e-Portfolio Implementation Toolkit1 is the output from the JISC-funded e-Portfolio Implementation (ePI) study2 led by the University of Nottingham.

JOLT - Journal of Online Learning and Teaching Natalia V. Smirnova Instructor of English as a Second Language Department of Foreign Languages National Research University Higher School of Economics Saint Petersburg RUSSIA smirnovan@hse.ru Irina V. Nuzha Associate Professor of Teaching English as a Second Language Department of Foreign Languages National Research University Higher School of Economics Saint Petersburg RUSSIA inuzha@hse.ru Introduction Presentation skills have gained attention both in higher education and among business trainers, as they constitute one of the core competencies of a professional (Linardopoulos, 2010; Raybould & Sheedy, 2005). Getting the Mix Right Again: An Updated and Theoretical Rationale for Interaction Terry AndersonAthabasca University – Canada’s Open University No topic raises more contentious debate among educators than the role of interaction as a crucial component of the education process. This debate is fueled by surface problems of definition and vested interests of professional educators, but is more deeply marked by epistemological assumptions relative to the role of humans and human interaction in education and learning. The seminal article by Daniel and Marquis (1979) challenged distance educators to get the mixture right between independent study and interactive learning strategies and activities.

The Methods and Means to grading Student Participation in Online Discussions This is the final post in a three-part series on how to create effective discussions in an online environment in the context of courses for credit. In this post I’ll share how to grade and asses students contributions in online discussion forums – the final yet essential step that solidifies and reinforces student learning. I am eager to share my insight into the measurement component of online discussions, as we found within our own institution’s online program that it was the assessment aspect, through the use of a rubric was the critical element that raised the bar for our threaded discussions. The rubric allowed course instructors to give ‘good’ feedback to students, clarified for students what was expected of them in discussions and to the astonishment of some of our professors, it [the rubric] improved the quality and quantity of discussion postings significantly. How much is the discussion/contribution component worth in the overall grading scheme of an online class? Like this:

Using Rubrics to Grade Online Discussions - ELC Support A rubric is a scoring scale used to evaluate a student's work. Rubrics spell out to students exactly what is expected of them, and they list the criteria instructors use to assess students' work. Rubrics also help instructors by providing guidelines for more objective grading. The Value of Rubrics Rubrics are useful for assessing work in any classroom setting, but they are especially helpful in online courses, where all information must be clearly stated in course documents. In some courses, instructors use rubrics for each assignment.

Critical thinking in the Online Classroom This is part 3 in a 3 part series discussing the concept of ‘presence’ in online learning communities. I’ve been writing about online presence in this series and though complex, it is best understood by the Community of Inquiry (CoI) model, a framework of three dimensions that work together to create what I call a complete learning experience (though the creators of the model call it an ‘educational experience’ where all three coincide (Garrison et al., 2000). In part one, I reviewed instructor presence and part two, social presence. Though this third dimension is officially labeled ‘cognitive presence‘ I have made reference to critical thinking, as this is what should be happening in the cognitive presence domain, which I’ll elaborate on further in the post.

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