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Four Skills to Teach Students In the First Five Days of School

Four Skills to Teach Students In the First Five Days of School
Jane Mount/MindShift The first few days of school are a vital time to set the right tone for the rest of the year. Many teachers focus on important things like getting to know their students, building relationships and making sure students know what the classroom procedures will be. While those things are important, Alan November, a former teacher-turned-author and lecturer says the most important ideas to hammer home will help students learn on their own for the rest of the year. “The name of the game is to find the right information with the right question,” said November during a workshop at the 2014 gathering of the International Society of Technology in Education in Atlanta. “My job used to be to give you the information, now my job is to teach you how to find the information.” “The best teachers were kids who had really struggled with the material and really understand what it’s like to learn.” “Kids literally take their teachers assignment and Google it,” November said.

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/08/four-skills-to-teach-students-in-the-first-five-days-of-school-alan-november/

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