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20 Gifs That Teach You Science Concepts Better Than Your Teacher Probably Can - StumbleUpon

20 Gifs That Teach You Science Concepts Better Than Your Teacher Probably Can - StumbleUpon
These Gifs are astoundingly elegant. 10) Here’s how you convert Cartesian (rectangular) to Polar Coordinates 9) This is how Exterior Angles of Polygons work (they add up to 360 degrees) 8) This is a Hyperboloid made up of straight lines 7) This is also a Hyperboloid of straight lines 6) This is how White Blood Cells keep you safe (in the video, a white blood cell chases and engulfs this bacteria–watch until the end!) 5) This is Earth’s ice and vegetation cycle over a year 4) There is Flammable Matter in Smoke (it’s not just nothingness, obviously) 3) This is what it looks like when you set a Flammable Gas on fire in a glass jar 2) This is vortex pinning (A superconductor levitates over a magnetic track) 1) This is how Tension works in relation to falling objects (watch a slinky fall to the Earth; this is how slinkies always fall) Over the course of a single year, we compile thousands of articles, and generate dozens upon dozens of high-quality videos and infographics. Stop by and say hello.

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Videos Hans Rosling explains a very common misunderstanding about the world: That saving the poor children leads to overpopulation. Not only is it not right, it’s the other way around! The world might not be as bad as you might believe! Google's AI Can Dream, and Here's What it Looks Like Software engineers at Google have been analyzing the 'dreams' of their computers. And it turns out that androids do dream of electric sheep... and also pig-snails, camel-birds and dog-fish. This conclusion has been made after testing the ability of Google's servers to recognize and create images of commonplace objects – for example, bananas and measuring cups. The result of this experiment is some tessellating Escher-esque artwork with Dali-like quirks.

Car maintenance and repair cost grapher This page helps you display and understand how much it has cost you to maintain and repair your car. You need to supply the data, which is just a list of amounts you paid for maintenance and repair and the odometer mileage at which the work was done. The analyzer spreads these costs out a bit and displays a record of how much the car has cost to maintain and repair over its life so far.

Beautiful Mathematical GIFs Will Mesmerize You Digital artist and physics PhD student Dave Whyte is dazzling our computer screens with his mesmerizing GIFs that are the perfect marriage of mathematics and art. And we can’t stop watching them. Whyte shares his brilliant, procrastination-fueling creations on an almost daily basis on his Tumblr account, Bees & Bombs.

wait but why: Putting Time In Perspective Humans are good at a lot of things, but putting time in perspective is not one of them. It’s not our fault—the spans of time in human history, and even more so in natural history, are so vast compared to the span of our life and recent history that it’s almost impossible to get a handle on it. If the Earth formed at midnight and the present moment is the next midnight, 24 hours later, modern humans have been around since 11:59:59pm—1 second. 255Tbps: World’s fastest network could carry all of the internet’s traffic on a single fiber A joint group of researchers from the Netherlands and the US have smashed the world speed record for a fiber network, pushing 255 terabits per second down a single strand of glass fiber. This is equivalent to around 32 terabytes per second — enough to transfer a 1GB movie in 31.25 microseconds (0.03 milliseconds), or alternatively, the entire contents of your 1TB hard drive in about 31 milliseconds. To put 255Tbps into perspective, the fastest single-fiber links in commercial operation top out at 100Gbps, or 2,550 times slower. 255Tbps is mindbogglingly quick; it’s greater, by far, than the total capacity of every cable — hundreds of glass fibers — currently spanning the Atlantic Ocean. In fact, 255 terabits per second is similar to — or maybe even more than — the total sum of all traffic flowing across the internet at peak time. How did the researchers at Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e) and University of Central Florida (CREOL) do it? Multi-core fiber, of course!

21 GIFs That Explain Mathematical Concepts “Let's face it; by and large math is not easy, but that's what makes it so rewarding when you conquer a problem, and reach new heights of understanding.” Danica McKellar As we usher in the start of a new school year, it’s time to hit the ground running in your classes! Math can be pretty tough, but since it is the language in which scientists interpret the Universe, there’s really no getting around learning it. Check out these gifs that will help you visualize some tricky aspects of math, so you can dominate your exams this year. Ellipse:

Interactive The World of Seven Billion The map shows population density; the brightest points are the highest densities. Each country is colored according to its average annual gross national income per capita, using categories established by the World Bank (see key below). Some nations— like economic powerhouses China and India—have an especially wide range of incomes. But as the two most populous countries, both are lower middle class when income is averaged per capita. What It Felt Like to Test the First Submarine Nuclear Reactor In the middle of last century, out in southern Idaho, amid the sagebrush and the steppes, the Navy kept a secret site. In that place—dry and arid, far from the sea and very much unlike it—scientists and engineers simulated a nuclear-powered submarine. It was more than a mere war game. The scientists and engineers had created one of the first nuclear reactors ever.

Quantum mechanics 101: Demystifying tough physics in 4 easy lessons Ready to level up your working knowledge of quantum mechanics? Check out these four TED-Ed Lessons written by Chad Orzel, Associate Professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Union College and author of How to Teach Quantum Physics to Your Dog. 1. Particles and waves: The central mystery of quantum mechanics The Invisible Universe Professor Ian Morison 1) Evidence of Dark Matter in Galaxy Clusters The first evidence of a large amount of unseen matter came from observations made by Fritz Zwicky in the 1930's. Jobs Charted by State and Salary The industries that people work in can say a lot about an area. Is there a lot of farming? Is there a big technology market? Couple the jobs that people work with salary, and you also see where the money's at. You see a state's priorities.

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