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Oxford Open

Oxford Open
Oxford Open OUP Supports Open Access Oxford University Press (OUP) is mission-driven to facilitate the widest possible dissemination of high-quality research. We embrace both green and gold open access (OA) publishing to support this mission. A Proven Track Record of Success OUP has been publishing OA content since 2004. We have also successfully launched or taken over high-quality OA titles, including: Genome Biology and Evolution, Journal of Legal Analysis, Progress of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, and Database. OUP facilitates green OA either by allowing authors to deposit versions of their manuscripts in institutional or subject repositories after a specified time period, or depositing the version of record on their behalf. Supporting the Evolution of Open Access Publishing Sustainable, high-quality OA publishing requires either funding to be available to pay for Article Processing Charges, sponsorship, or suitable embargo periods. OUP operates two different open access models:

http://www.oxfordjournals.org/en/oxford-open/index.html

Related:  Free & Open Education ResourcesOa

OAIster Access to OAIster A freely accessible site for searching only OAIster records is available at Additionally, OAIster records are fully accessible through WorldCat.org, and appear as WorldCat.org search results along with records from thousands of libraries worldwide. The OAIster database is searchable on the OCLC FirstSearch service, providing another valuable access point for this rich database and a complement to other FirstSearch databases. Contributing to OAIster The OAIster database is included in WorldCat and metadata harvesting goes through the WorldCat Digital Collection Gateway. These services offer several advantages for repository managers:

Open Access The Case for Open Access Open Access (OA) stands for unrestricted access and unrestricted reuse. Here’s why that matters. Biblioteki cyfrowe W Polsce: Regionalne Instytucjonalne Wybrane kolekcje cyfrowe Federacja Bibliotek Cyfrowych Opracowanie dokumentów elektronicznych Na świecie: Międzynarodowe Narodowe Instytucjonalne

everything elearning. Learning Objects Overview Learning objects (or RLO - reusable learning object) have been the hype of the elearning industry since 2001. They have been hailed as the future reality of learning...and as idealistic, but unattainable view for education. Separating the hype from reality is still an ongoing activity. Most likely, learning objects will fall somewhere in the middle of all the speculation - between the "next best thing" and "impractical".

Multimedia Educational Resource for Learning and Online Teaching Return to MERLOT II Home Page Search all MERLOT Select to go to your profile Click to expand login or register menu Select to go to your workspace The London Reading Club a novel for the Internet about London Underground in seven cars and a crash 253 – this is how Geoff Ryman conceived the story on Bakerloo Line. Each strand of the Tube has such unique names, appearances and characters with their similarities and differences.

Criteria for Open Access and publishing – ScienceOpen In June 2015, the Committee on Publication Ethics, the Directory of Open Access Journals, the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association and the World Association of Medical Editors updated their joint statement, originally published in 2013: the Principles of Transparency and Best Practice in Scholarly Publishing [1]. These principles were to a considerable extent derived from the criteria for the admission of journals into DOAJ that were expanded, updated and put into practice in March 2014 [2]. In addition, 50 Science Europe members issued a statement in April [3] this year on four new guidelines for publishers when providing payments/subsidies for Open Access venues. The first principle states that journals must be listed in DOAJ, Web of Science, Scopus or PubMed.

"Fair" open access and the future of scientific publishing When researchers, funders, universities and libraries started thinking about open access and improving scholarly communication in the late 1990s, the focus was on access. Indeed, the most immediate challenge was to make it possible to access scientific literature resulting from public funding. Today, an increasing number of funder policies mandate open access, e.g. the EC's mandate on open access to publications in Horizon 2020. This type of policy often indeed focuses on access, is quite open regarding 'how' that access should be reached (green v. gold OA), and therefore sets few extra conditions regarding open access publishing and scholarly communication in general.

An Error Occurred Setting Your User Cookie This site uses cookies to improve performance. If your browser does not accept cookies, you cannot view this site. Setting Your Browser to Accept Cookies There are many reasons why a cookie could not be set correctly. Below are the most common reasons: You have cookies disabled in your browser. Why librarians should be concerned with Open Access Rapid price escalations in scholarly journal subscription rates have been adversely affecting access to scholarly information. Often referred to as the 'serials pricing crisis', the costs of academic journals have been sharply climbing for over two decades now. According to the Association of Research Libraries (ARL), the average cost of a serial subscription for ARL member libraries increased by 315% from 1989 to 2003. This increase far exceeds the rise in the Consumer Price Index of 68% for those years.

Open access Open access logo, originally designed by Public Library of Science. Whilst no official open access logo exists, organisations are free to select the logo style that best supports their visual language. Other logos are also in use. 9-minute video explaining open access Open access (OA) refers to online research outputs that are free of all restrictions on access (e.g. access tolls) and free of many restrictions on use (e.g. certain copyright and license restrictions).[1] Open access can be applied to all forms of published research output, including peer-reviewed and non peer-reviewed academic journal articles, conference papers, theses,[2] book chapters,[1] and monographs.[3] Taylor & Francis Author Services - Taylor & Francis open access program Skip to navigation Taylor & Francis has been publishing academic research since 1798 and on an open access basis since 2006. We offer a broad range of author options, enabling authors to publish their material in quality open access journals with a high degree of peer review integrity. How do I benefit? Publishing in a Taylor & Francis Open and Routledge Open journal ensures:

Facilitating access to free online resources: challenges and opportunities for the library community A white paper from Taylor & Francis “While we understand that the questions we posed encompassed a world of free-to-view material beyond the traditional book and journal content that is normally associated with the offerings of major scientific, scholarly and professional publishers, we nevertheless are acutely aware that there are key roles that we need to perform and a whole range of new services and products that we should look to develop. All key stakeholders in the information and research communication worlds are aware that ‘free’ does not mean cost-free. However, free-to-access and free-to-view, with free content availability in models such as ‘freemium offerings’, are among the paths towards global access that we are all now embracing and experimenting with.” Dr David Green, Global Journals Publishing Director We at Taylor & Francis wanted to conduct a research programme to help explore the issues relating to free content discoverability from the perspective of librarians.

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